Cooling the cab

When travelling with a Mitsubishi Fuso FG in real high temperatures, the AC can't cope properly with the circumstances.
When +/- 32º C outside, the AC on, at highest level, with ventilator at the highest speed, inside air circulation only, it is not really cool in the cab.
Several times the Mitsubishi dealer has been informed about this aspect of the Fuso FG but after checking dealer claims everything is allright.
Therefore, it is considered now to install an aftermarket AC.
A unit on the roof of the FG.
Does any Forum visitor know of such cooling equipment suitable for a FG?
 

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engineer

Adventurer
Sounds to me like a lack of ariflow, did they check the prefilter next to the evaporator? you can also clean the Evap insitu with coil cleaner, which is an alkaline. Be sure to flush with lots and lots of water after though, otherwise it will leak. Also clean the fan blades.
This may help it some, esspecially if you've done alot of dusty roads in the past.
 

haven

Expedition Leader
Dynamat makes insulation panels that will reduce heat transfer
through the roof, doors, floor and back of the cab. The insulation
will also make the cab quieter. See the Dynaliner and Extremeliner
heat barrier products on the web site http://www.dynaliner.com

Another step to consider is a darker tint on the windows
to reduce solar gain. For safety considerations, you
shouldn't tint the windshield as dark as the windows

Chip Haven
 

kerry

Expedition Leader
I found that driving west in the late afternoon on a hot summer day caused the biggest problems. Too much heat gain thru the windshield.
 

dhackney

Expedition Leader
Our exterior temps have ranged from 14.5F / -9.7C to >110 F / 43.3 C.

Our cab is fully lined with Dynamat acoustic mat material.

We have never found the current generation Fuso FG cab heating or cooling (air conditioning) to be inadequate for the conditions.
 

kerry

Expedition Leader
Since Doug brought it up, it reminded me that the heating is not that great in mine either. Perhaps there is an issue with the temperature selection system. I've never gotten really hot or really cold air out of mine.
 

outbackjack

Observer
I might have missed something, but is this a dual cab or single?

You could mount a small overhead AC from the small japanese buses. Ie Hiace, Tarago etc?
 

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KMTC

New member
A/c concerns

In most cases we find that the radiator and condenser fins are plugged with dirt form the dirt roads traveled on. I recommend blowing the fins out on a regular basis. This will allow the engine to run cooler, and the a/c to blow cooler. You must also remember that when the a/c is on recirculation mode (most optimal) the air is sucked in under the dash on the passenger side of the truck. This creates another unique problem that many people miss. There is a cabin air filter there. This filter then gets plugged with dirt as well. This must be checked frequently in off road application trucks as well. This will restrict the air flow thus giving the illusion that the a/c is inadequate. I hope this helps some of you in some way.
 

whatcharterboat

Supporting Sponsor, Overland Certified OC0018
Engineer
Sounds to me like a lack of ariflow, did they check the prefilter next to the evaporator? you can also clean the Evap insitu with coil cleaner, which is an alkaline. Be sure to flush with lots and lots of water after though, otherwise it will leak. Also clean the fan blades.
This may help it some, esspecially if you've done alot of dusty roads in the past.
Reply With Quote
Engineer backs you up here Ron. He'd know. This is the sort of driving some of these tour operators do for months on end. High speed, heavy corrugations and lots of DUST. Not his bus (one of ours) but you get the idea. We retain the cab air and fit a second much larger compressor for the rear body.



Also we move the condenser up high into the middle to allow for bigger wheels and they are less prone to damage offroad. Some of our motorhome guys will charge off into the scrub where there are no roads so there is a real danger from sticks etc with the condenser in the standard location. We do a kit for this with the different hoses, brackets etc.
 
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