Colorado owners likes /dislikes

Smileyshaun

Observer
I’m really contemplating getting a new truck as I’ve just grown tired of repairs and maintenance on older vehicles and like to hear from actual Colorado owners( not just people with a internet opinion on something they don’t own ) on things they like and don’t like about their vehicle I’m still very up in the air about what model I want to get. Of course I’m leaning towards a ZR two just Trying to justify the cost of it with all the other wonderful life responsibilities.
 

ChasingOurTrunks

Active member
We have a GMC Canyon, which is identical to the Colorado except for the front fenders, grill, and bumper. I would advise to stick with the bow tie if you can — we would have done so, but got too good a deal on the Canyon to pass up. While many aftermarket accessories should bolt up to the Canyon just as easily as the Colorado, they are often only sold “approved” for the Colorado (which makes ordering and installation much easier)

In terms of performance, it’s a really excellent platform. The gasser V6 is a great little engine with plenty of power. The 4x4 system works a treat, and our Canyon is superbly balanced off road, like a little mountain goat; it honestly just plucks it’s way through even very difficult terrain. Ours has the G80 auto locking rear diff, which works surprisingly well, though I would prefer a manual locker as the auto locker requires a bit of wheel spin before it kicks in.

As far as packages go, it’s a lot like the Jeep. If you want a turn key off road rig with factory goodies, the ZR2 is a great choice. If you plan to build it yourself then one of the other packages may be better and save you money. However, keep in mind that the ZR2 has a wider stance and bigger fenders — so it’s not just a bolt-on upgrade from a WT to the ZR2.

However, buying a lower cost truck, and adding twin lockers ($2k), bigger wheels and tires ($2k), and a better front bar ($3k max), will result in a weapon of an off road truck. I’m just waiting on a few more aluminum options to hit the market (Aluminess are you listening? Bring your Tacoma bumper to the Colorado pretty please!)

Keep in mind though that if you are coming from a wagon, you will need to sort out a system for the bed. That’s the main “con” for these trucks (or any midsize truck) in my view, is dust and dirt after even a short off road stint. This can be as simple as sealed action packers (they are not dust proof themselves but $15 in weather stripping changes that) or as complex as a tray and canopy system ($10k+).

Also, these are low-GVM trucks. They have 1500 lbs payload, but you lose a good bit of that when you go with the ZR2. It’s still better than most other 4x4s but it’s not infinite, and you will eat into it more with having to add bed storage (again, optional) and off road accessories like skids, bumpers, etc. So one still needs to be strategic to keep these trucks as intended — light and nimble
.

Bang for the buck, it’s hard to beat the Canyon/Colorado for an overland platform. The combination of capability, aftermarket support, and small footprint is pretty spot on.

My next rig is likely going to be a new Defender, because I think that’s the only platform in this footprint that beats the Colorado in North America for my travel style, and we prefer the wagon layout. But if the Defender proves to be unreliable or not all it is cracked up to be, the Colorado remains the top spot on my list.
 

Smileyshaun

Observer
We have a GMC Canyon, which is identical to the Colorado except for the front fenders, grill, and bumper. I would advise to stick with the bow tie if you can — we would have done so, but got too good a deal on the Canyon to pass up. While many aftermarket accessories should bolt up to the Canyon just as easily as the Colorado, they are often only sold “approved” for the Colorado (which makes ordering and installation much easier)

In terms of performance, it’s a really excellent platform. The gasser V6 is a great little engine with plenty of power. The 4x4 system works a treat, and our Canyon is superbly balanced off road, like a little mountain goat; it honestly just plucks it’s way through even very difficult terrain. Ours has the G80 auto locking rear diff, which works surprisingly well, though I would prefer a manual locker as the auto locker requires a bit of wheel spin before it kicks in.

As far as packages go, it’s a lot like the Jeep. If you want a turn key off road rig with factory goodies, the ZR2 is a great choice. If you plan to build it yourself then one of the other packages may be better and save you money. However, keep in mind that the ZR2 has a wider stance and bigger fenders — so it’s not just a bolt-on upgrade from a WT to the ZR2.

However, buying a lower cost truck, and adding twin lockers ($2k), bigger wheels and tires ($2k), and a better front bar ($3k max), will result in a weapon of an off road truck. I’m just waiting on a few more aluminum options to hit the market (Aluminess are you listening? Bring your Tacoma bumper to the Colorado pretty please!)

Keep in mind though that if you are coming from a wagon, you will need to sort out a system for the bed. That’s the main “con” for these trucks (or any midsize truck) in my view, is dust and dirt after even a short off road stint. This can be as simple as sealed action packers (they are not dust proof themselves but $15 in weather stripping changes that) or as complex as a tray and canopy system ($10k+).

Also, these are low-GVM trucks. They have 1500 lbs payload, but you lose a good bit of that when you go with the ZR2. It’s still better than most other 4x4s but it’s not infinite, and you will eat into it more with having to add bed storage (again, optional) and off road accessories like skids, bumpers, etc. So one still needs to be strategic to keep these trucks as intended — light and nimble
.

Bang for the buck, it’s hard to beat the Canyon/Colorado for an overland platform. The combination of capability, aftermarket support, and small footprint is pretty spot on.

My next rig is likely going to be a new Defender, because I think that’s the only platform in this footprint that beats the Colorado in North America for my travel style, and we prefer the wagon layout. But if the Defender proves to be unreliable or not all it is cracked up to be, the Colorado remains the top spot on my list.

Thank you for your input.
I know I can add Off-road gear to a lower model rig but I’ve been doing that my whole life and honestly have grown a bit tired of turning wrenches and smelling like welding smoke and grinding dust so that’s a lot of the appeal of just going with a ZR2 and having everything ready to go with a warranty .
Not overly worried about payload I’ve used everything from a 3/4 suburban to a forester to a duel sport and have Always found a way to accommodate the available space but have really gravitated more to backpacking gear for camping and unfortunately I have split days off so a lot of my exploring is just day trips now .
 

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ChasingOurTrunks

Active member
Thank you for your input.
I know I can add Off-road gear to a lower model rig but I’ve been doing that my whole life and honestly have grown a bit tired of turning wrenches and smelling like welding smoke and grinding dust so that’s a lot of the appeal of just going with a ZR2 and having everything ready to go with a warranty .
Not overly worried about payload I’ve used everything from a 3/4 suburban to a forester to a duel sport and have Always found a way to accommodate the available space but have really gravitated more to backpacking gear for camping and unfortunately I have split days off so a lot of my exploring is just day trips now .
I’m in a similar boat. When we got the Canyon my plan was to do 90% + of my mods myself, but the most precious commodity of all — time!! — is short. The ZR2 is a great option for that. As far as off road goes, you won’t find many places that a stock ZR2 can’t go that can be accessed by any other vehicle off the lot (I.e. JL/JT Rubicon). The backpacker mentality is what we use too — that’s what’s nice about the extra payload. You can add a few select creature comforts easily to the rig to make it really suit you without being limited by weight, especially if most of your gear is backpacker quality already. In other words, because my personal kit is only about 40 lbs, the 1500lbs lets me toss in extra fuel for added range, or a hot shower to extend my comfortable time away with travelling companions, or more water/food if the trip calls for it, etc.If a person wants the shower, the propane fire pit, the skottle, and about a thousand pounds of bolt ons from the Trasharoo to the winch fairlead, they will be disappointed as 1500 lbs doesn’t go far with that style of trip, but with your mindset you should be good.


I’m also very interested in people’s opinion in the trucks just daily driving normal life ability’s
This is where they really shine in my opinion. I have a super fun motorbike, a full sized truck, and our Canyon, and if I need to run out the Canyon keys are the ones I reach for first. They are extremely easy to live with in a big city. Great on gas, good power for pulling past people on main roads or getting up to highway speeds, and very nimble for parking and manoeuvring.

As I mentioned in my last post, my next rig will likely be a Defender but it’s worth mentioning that we are planning on keeping the Canyon — we’ll get rid of our full size if we have to, but the canyon is just so dang good as a day to day vehicle, as a touring platform, and as a 4x4 if a person really wants to build it up. They are really excellent vehicles.
 

Danavision

New member
I own a 18' Colorado Z71 long bed and I love it. I looked at the Tacoma but the Colorado was better for commuting. If I had to replace my truck today I'd get a ZR2. I've been off-road with a couple and they could keep up with all he other vehicles on the trails. The only thing I don't like about the Colorado is that there aren't as many aftermarket choices for it compared to the Tacoma and the Gladiator. I wanted a long bed after having a couple of short beds so that limits my choices to the Tacoma or the Colorado.
 

huachuca

Adventurer
We’ve had a crewcab, gas, 2019 ZR2 with the Bison package for about a year and 20K miles. Our previous two trucks were crewcab, TRD Off-road Tacoma’s (05 & 12). They were solid vehicles and I have few complaints in 300k+ miles but I was concerned with the performance of the 3.5L that replaced the 4.0L a few years back.

So far, the ZR2 has exceeded my expectations. It gets much better gas mileage and is noticeably more powerful than either Toyota, especially when towing our small (19’ / 3,500 lbs) Scamp fifth wheel. The six way leather power seats have enough adjustments to allow me to find a comfortable position even on 12-14 hour drives. I’ve never driven a Tacoma with the Pro package but the suspension and DSSV shocks on the ZR2 are amazing for off road driving - head and shoulders over the TRD’s Bilstiens. The electric rear locking diff engages much smoother and quicker than Toyota's. Plus, the front locker isn’t even an option on the Tacoma. The Bison package may.not be necessary for your needs but I had to add skids, sliders and other protective aftermarket gear to the Tacoma that are included with this option. And the skids are made of boron which is lighter and stronger than aluminum. As another advantage, Chevy offered a 9.5k winch as a dealer installed and warrantied accessory which I had added to my truck.

The Colorado isn’t perfect - the door pockets are terrible and the Tacoma has much better storage behind and beneath the rear seat. I miss the 110v inverter and the covered storage pockets in the Taco’s bed. The 4WD selector is located in an awkward position.
 

Smileyshaun

Observer
I’ll be honest went and test drove a z71 and wasn’t all that impressed , seats weren’t all that comfy and I was expecting I bit more comfortable ride over bumps and potholes . It wasent horrible by any means but just wasn’t blown away by it , gonna go check out a zr2 this week and maybe go look at a ranger and Tacoma to compare .
 

spectre6000

Observer
2020 Bison diesel owner. I picked my truck up from the deal just a few days before my wife gave birth to our daughter. New babies are supposed to be more or less under quarantine until they're vaccinated (2 months), so we hunkered down. Once we got the all clear, the world ended... So... That's your filter. I've got 4K miles on it as of Thursday, and none of that has been off road yet (extreme disappointment), so all I can speak to is day to day use.

Day to day... It's awesome! Way better than it has any right to be. I live in the mountains above Denver, and driving up 285 every time I go anywhere (steep highway speeds) is night and day compared to my previous truck and my wife's JKU Rubicon. Other vehicles struggle, and must downshift. 2500 RPM easy. The diesel just effortlessly saunters up like it's flat ground. It's more relaxed. MPG is mid-20s. Basic diesel stuff. The real killer app is the suspension though. Driving through the canyons up here in my wife's Jeep, the speed limit is about as fast as you'd really care to go. In the truck, I set the cruise control for a mile or two over and just steer. Of all the cars I've driven, it most directly reminds me of my BMW e46 330i with all the sport boxes checked (specifically for this conversation, the sport suspension). It's incredibly controlled, and stays surprisingly flat through corners. With groceries in the back, I can get them to move through the most severe corners, but that's about it. I haven't been on any long drives with the truck yet, so I can't speak to that. Definitely looking forward to it though. It's way better than it has any right to be.

Complaints... I wish the information console was customizable. It'd be nice to be able to have the subset of screens I reference frequently adjacent so I don't have to scroll around so much. A lot of people complain about the size of the wireless charger; these are people with giant phones. I have the smaller iPhone, and it fits perfectly. At some point before MY2020, they eliminated the USB ports in the center console, and replaced them with a plug. That's pretty lame. The rear seat folding situation is also kinda dumb. Fold the seat bottom up, and theres a plastic bin and a heavily contoured floor. Fold the seat back down, and your loading surface is high, short, and I think slightly sloped. I've read a lot of complaints about the rear window latch being cheap (I have very few reasons to open it, and haven't had any complaints the 2-3 times I have). I think the windows in the rear doors don't roll all the way down, which is a pet peeve of mine... The AEV floor mats occasionally hang on the door and get a little hump at the edge. Push it down, and it flattens back out after a few hours.

Issues. The boot around the DEF filler neck wasn't properly seated when I got the truck (5 miles on the clock), and all the windy roads up here meant it pissed DEF everywhere. It was nothing to fix, and I removed the wheel liner and cleaned it all out. Minor annoyance. I installed a block heater port below the DS headlight, and when I removed the fender flare, a plastic weld let go. I have to accept some blame for that though, because it was definitely cold (winter). I patched it up (probably would have been good forever), but GM replaced the flare under warranty. The big issue I'm having, which I'm sure sounds worse than it is, is an oil consumption issue. I think the inlet turbo seal is leaking, and it's eating oil. So far, they're taking care of it, and it's a diesel, aka oil burner, so it doesn't super care that much if it burns some oil, and there shouldn't be any long term damage. Still a bummer, and I have to go through an oil consumption test before they move. Once I finish the consumption test, they'll find it and replace it under warranty, and all will be right as rain. We went through similar issues with my wife's Jeep; a shaft in the transmission was improperly assembled and it was rebuilt in a few tens of Ks, but has been perfect since. I'm sure this will resolve in the same manner.
 

ChasingOurTrunks

Active member
Good point about the 4x4 indicator.

I know it seems minor but going with the ZR2 gets you an in-dash display that tells you 4x4 status. Otherwise, without it you are relying on a tiny light on the selector knob which is hidden by the steering wheel. It’s an objectively terrible design, so if you are buying used, find one that has The 4x4 status screen on the dash cluster. Mine does not have it.
 

twin_magnolias

Observer
I've got a 2019 ZR2 V6. I bought it this summer, so haven't had a ton of miles on it yet. I'm coming from a Jeep Wrangler so that impacts some of my likes and dislikes. Currently, I'm running a Leer topper with Rhino Rack platform on it, a CargoGlide 1000, aux battery in a battery box, and ARB fridge.

Pros:
1. ZR2 package is a great turn key off-road package. My Jeep was the Unlimited Sport, and I always planned to upgrade the lockers, etc. etc. and never did. The upgrades are baked into the price and now I can focus on other mods.
2. The suspension has WAY BETTER road manners than my Jeep. That's what an IFS gives you over a solid front axle. I prefer solid front axles, but it's real nice not getting jarred to death over every bump or pothole. Some folks want to raise/level the truck, but it rides pretty find as is for me. I may put 32's on it so I don't have to trim like you do for 33's. Add-a-leaf or aftermarket leafs may also be in my future once I get my Relentless Fab rear bumper/tire carrier on it.
3. The gas mileage is great. I have a Leer topper with a Rhino Rack roof rack on it, and I'm still getting 18+ avg. mpg on a tank. My Jeep got 14 with a roof rack, but it had 33's too.
4. It's more comfortable. I'm a bigger guy, and I've got a wife, two kids, and a French Bulldog that ride in this truck with me. The Taco felt too small. I I was by myself, it might have been sufficient, but the Colorado doesn't make passengers feel like they're squeezed in.
5. The gas and diesel engine use the same battery tray, but the diesel has a bigger battery. That means the gas engines can upgrade to a bigger battery to run lights and such without any modifications.

Edit to add: 6. WAY more giddy-up and go than the JKU.

Cons:
1. The ZR2 has less payload capacity because it has a different suspension.
2. The aftermarket support isn't what Jeep or Tacomas enjoy. There isn't much I've wanted to do that wasn't available, but there are a few things I have not found anyone who was making a product for the Colorado. Mostly, you're limited to one or two options.
3. The ZR2 hood looks awesome, but it's harder to see around than the Jeep's. I want a front camera just to see how close my bumper is to things. There is one for previous model years, but they changed the pinout in the 2019 and there isn't a solution for that yet.
4. No plug-n-play aftermarket dual battery setup. You're going to have to fab that up yourself, or run an aux battery in the bed.
5. I bump the 4x4 switch with my right knee getting in/out of the truck and frequently knock it into auto. I wish I had the manual 4x4 shift like was in my Jeep.
6. The rear shock mounts are too low on the axle. Get skids.

Three of those cons really could be lumped together as they have to deal with a lack of aftermarket support. My previous two vehicles were 1) Jeep, and 2) Harley. Coming from those worlds of seeming infinite amounts of add-ons, the simple things I'd like to have for the Colorado that aren't really there is challenging.


However, I wouldn't change my current truck for anything else on the market right now. Five years may be different, but I'm really happy with this ZR2.
 
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Ron B

Explorer
I have a 2018 LT diesel...I wanted the most stripped down one I could find for a daily driver...and the Diesel engine for the mpg and possibly some towing if my other truck ever needed a flat tow. I have an h1 as a toy to wheel/camp etc so didn’t need to go that direction. As mentioned above I also find it a bit lacking in internal storage but where it really shines is on the freeway — LA to Vegas and back on a tank — averaging 29 to 32 between 70 and 80 is pretty nice. Around town/typical LA traffic it’s in the low 20’s so basically it’s getting pretty much the same mpg as my old hatchback.

It was a tough transition from my Mazda3 manual tranny to this though...it’s my first automatic (well except the h1 - but at least that goes when I hit the gas). Maybe all cars are like this today but the lag on the gas pedal is insane. The engine has plenty of power, I think it’s a computer thing — I can almost feel the truck wondering if I really want or need to do what my foot just asked the pedal to do. Then a second+ later it goes “oh...he’s still pushing the pedal so he must want to go.”

Other than that and the extra length I am not used to (not the truck’s fault obviously) its been a pretty good vehicle. My bad on not getting the nicer interior/seats/stereo and going so spartan, would’ve been so much more comfy on longer trips. The ZR2 I test drove was awesome and tempting, but again I already had a 4X4 toy and wanted the most economical daily driver I could get that could occasionally schleppe my work equipment/cart.

I recently when wheeling with a friend in a very close to stock Colorado 4WD — it got a little banged up but overall it did very well and was no doubt a more comfy ride than mine. There are pictures in another thread about Miller Jeep trail
 

Beltfed

New member
2019 ZR2 Bison with the 2.8L diesel.

Had Chevy not offered the 2.8L Diesel and the Bison package to go with it, I doubt I would have even test drove a Colorado.
I likely would have ended up with a Tacoma Pro or not bought a new truck at all.

Previous couple of vehicles to this were: 2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser (still have it), 2004 Land Rover Discovery (crashed it thanks to the young lady who attempted a blind left turn right in front of me).

Likes:
- 2.8L Diesel
- Bison package is almost spot on as a turn key off roader/overlander right out of the gate.
- Front and rear lockers from the factory.
- AEV's aftermarket product designs & support

Dislikes:

Interior: (mostly minor coachwork type stuff and the dash layout)
- key in the ignition and separate FOB (I know, first world problems).
- The wireless phone charger is useless (and I still have an older iPhone 5, but it won't charge through the case - serious question, does anyone use a phone without a protective case?)
- T-case selector knob on the left of the steering wheel placement is poorly thought out.
- E-brake with an old school pedal as opposed to a proper hand-brake.
- No fore-thought on future electronics with blank button placements - but there is this cool little cubby front and centre you or your significant other can use for a tube of chap-stick or lipstick or something.
- Center consol has no tray - (although they are found on amazon cheaply enough).
- Rear seat storage - very little innovative thinking went into this.

Exterior:
- Exhaust termination on the ZR2 diesels is simply not acceptable. There are good aftermarket solutions, but they can be expensive and really this truck with what they are trying to bill it to be, it shouldn't come this way.
- Fender flare and mud flap designs don't really protect this truck from spraying mud and debris all over the sides and as luck would have it, the door handles get covered.
- Approach and departure angles overall

General:
- AEV's product availability outside of the U.S.
- There is some old tech. in this newer platform truck that would have been nice to see at least available options for upgrades. Stuff like a power rear window, heated rear seats, A/C in the seats, etc. wouldn't be deal breakers in my books (obviously), but would have been nice to see GM develop and offer those type of options.
 

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spectre6000

Observer
1- key in the ignition and separate FOB (I know, first world problems).
2- The wireless phone charger is useless (and I still have an older iPhone 5, but it won't charge through the case - serious question, does anyone use a phone without a protective case?)
3- T-case selector knob on the left of the steering wheel placement is poorly thought out.
4- No fore-thought on future electronics with blank button placements - but there is this cool little cubby front and centre you or your significant other can use for a tube of chap-stick or lipstick or something.
5- Center consol has no tray - (although they are found on amazon cheaply enough).
6- Rear seat storage - very little innovative thinking went into this.
7- Exhaust termination on the ZR2 diesels is simply not acceptable. There are good aftermarket solutions, but they can be expensive and really this truck with what they are trying to bill it to be, it shouldn't come this way.
8- Fender flare and mud flap designs don't really protect this truck from spraying mud and debris all over the sides and as luck would have it, the door handles get covered.
9- Approach and departure angles overall
1- I was actually working on developing an aftermarket switchblade keyfob before the pandemic broke out. All the Chinese suppliers completely disappeared while they were dealing with it initially, then everything shut down everywhere else. It's been moved to a back burner, but will probably be picked up again at some point if someone doesn't beat me to it. I definitely agree with this though. Not a fan of the key situation (beats Toyota's outdated tech problems by a mile though).
2- I have my phone in a case, and it works just fine with the wireless charger. iPhone 8 in a Spigen case.
3- If you have to look at it, yes. Terrible placement. Once you get used to it, it's just like any other control; you reach down and turn it when you need to a notch in the direction you need it to go. 2wd, then drop to auto if things start getting dicey, then 4wd when things are genuinely bad or if you're fully off road, then 4low. I feel like there may be people of certain dimensions (height) where it's in a fine place, but for me, I have to duck around the steering wheel to see it. I just don't need to see it really.
4- I think you're talking about the unused button blanks. With a Bison, you just have all the buttons, so there were none left to blank. I agree that the chapstick holder is dumb. Great opportunity for the aftermarket to step up.
5- This has not been an issue for me, but I have yet to put anything in the center console at all. I just don't keep things in my truck ever.
6- Agreed 100%. Between the folding and the under seat storage, it's just subpar. I do like the little cubbies right at the very outside though. I think I took them out, but I had been keeping a pair of gloves there. Perfect access in that they're totally out of the way of everything, but when I need them, just open the back door, reach down, and keep going.
7- I got the exhaust relocation kit from GM (I don't think it was available for 2019). Solved.
8- THIS!!!! If you're driving around in icy stuff, god forbid you need fuel! The fuel filler door ends up under thick ice, and I'm convinced I'm going to break the filler door trying to break the ice sheet on top of it. Last I checked, there are still precisely ZERO mudflap options for the Bison outside the universal ones that never quite fit right. I ended up getting some factory mud flap take offs from another Colorado owner in the area, and I'll use them as templates to make some. This is an absolute must for me before snow flies this winter.
9- Meh... I agree with this and I don't... Yes, there are particular geometrical attributes that are better on other trucks. The Tacoma has better breakover, Gladiator better approach, etc. (I'm not looking at any specs, just going on memory). If you consider that it's a truck before it's an off road machine, I think this is forgivable. The geometry isn't all that bad, and tires and such fix a lot. A big part of the Gladiator's geometry is down to just coming with 35s from the factory. Take that away and all the class leading this and that falls to mid pack. Same with the Bronco.

Addendum to my previous post:
One thing that adds to the awesomeness is the auto transfer case on the ZR2s (I don't know if it's available on lower trims). One of the big problems we have up here is transitional weather. The temperature drops 5° or so per 1K' gained altitude. In spring and fall, there are frequently times when we'll get snow up in the mountains, but down in the flats it's just rain. That means that somewhere on the drive down, there's a sheet of ice on a section of windy road with a rock face on one side and a creek/stream on the other. Additionally on those windy mountain roads, as the snow/ice thaw, there are sections of the canyon that get sun and some that don't; that means you go from clear asphalt, to wet asphalt, to icy asphalt, to snow, and back... over and over and over again. I my last truck I had a transfer case that could shift on the fly, and I just kept one hand on the knob. In my wife's jeep, you have to weigh the ability to shift with the damage/wear of just keeping it in 4wd. With the ZR2, you put it in auto 4wd, and relax. There's a clutch on the front output shaft that releases to prevent bind. Nothing really all that novel if we're honest, but it's pretty great to have on a truck like this from a day to day perspective if you live someplace with weather.
 

Beltfed

New member
You are lucky your phone charges wirelessly - seriously, go buy a lotto ticket.
Guys are doing the delete mod to have another semi-useless cubby hole as opposed to the completely useless wireless charger.
Now that I think of it, that is my biggest pet peeve with this truck.

When I mentioned no spare electronic button placement, I'm referring to the lack thereof - Look at Toyota and other vehicles, and they will offer areas where future electronics like winch, lights and compressor switches can go. Surely GM realizes that these trucks will get further modified? Their teaming with AEV on the Bison certainly indicates as much.

Approach and departure - the Bison's nose juts out further than the regular ZR2 with the winch-ready bumper, but I'm not convinced they needed all of that room to facilitate the installation of the two model of winches it is geared up for. Likewise with the rear of the truck - the spare hangs far too low and once it is removed, the hitch is left out to snag and drag on stuff. I just think they could have brainstormed both items a bit better.

The diesel exhaust termination and Chevy performance 'high tuck' solution isn't really an upgrade - look at the AFE kit.
This is how it (the Bison for sure, and maybe an upgrade on the ZR2) should have come from the factory.

The flares on the stock, oem Bison suck and they even protrude about 3/4" past what the regular ZR2 ones do.
The fix (I'm hoping) is AEV's High Mark flares and mud flaps - which I'm about 90% done completing the install on.
Honestly, on the Bison, these flares should have come on the truck out of the gate - IMHO.

Another couple of items in the dislike pile I didn't mention:

Rear shock placement. I get that GM and Chevy have been doing this forever, and yeah - it's still dumb.
They could have drawn them closer into the hubs/discs.
Before anyone mentions shock skids - those are a given for any truck headed off-road regardless of where the shock is located.

Aluminium rear driveshaft. I'd totally be ok if I bought a 2wd colorado service truck to have an aluminium drive shaft. A truck geared for off-road and sold at a premium? Not a chance.
 
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