Colorado/Canyon Duramax Diesel DEAD in 2023

Ratman1979

Observer
The diesel engine is the only reason I bought my '19 ZR2. At altitude it is a smooth rig. It doesn't hunt for gears and shift all the time like several other vehicles I have driven out here. That said, the tiny rear seat in a four door truck is the reason I will not be buying another one.
 
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Deleted member 374434BT

Guest
Don't know why the new Dmax 3.0l wasn't made an option in the upcoming colorado/canyon. Appears to be a better match than in a full size.
 

roving1

Well-known member
Don't know why the new Dmax 3.0l wasn't made an option in the upcoming colorado/canyon. Appears to be a better match than in a full size.
It's a straight six. It is long in the full size truck. The packaging would never work for the midsize platforms. The 10 speed trans is huge too which probably also does not help.
 

phsycle

Adventurer
If the four banger is anything like Fords EcoBoost engines, it will be a completely different animal with a tune and a few mods.
Yeah, even Ford realized this with the Ranger. Ford’s Performance pack is relatively cheap and gets you 45hp/60lb/ft boost. I think I’d be happy with the 2.3 myself. Although 2.7 is just a beast.
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
Yeah, even Ford realized this with the Ranger. Ford’s Performance pack is relatively cheap and gets you 45hp/60lb/ft boost. I think I’d be happy with the 2.3 myself. Although 2.7 is just a beast.
The 2.7 is fun in a full size, four door truck...in a mid sized it would be an riot!
 

Dalko43

Explorer
The 4 cylinder turbo gasoline engines will offer decent low-end torque, not the same as a diesel, but decent nonetheless. The mpg advantage over a v6 gasser is there...if you don't haul or tow. The second you put a turbo gasser under load, it loses most of its efficiency advantage. This is why I think turbo gasoline engines really aren't the long-term answer for working trucks...and this is why we have yet to see a turbo gasser offered in any of the domestic 3/4 and 1 tons.



And FWIW, I think the modern diesel offerings (2.8l and 3.0l duramax, 3.0l powerstroke, 3.0l ecodiesel) have come a long way in terms of emissions reliability. There is even a rumor that Toyota may come out with a diesel design which reduces, or all together removes, the need for DEF and DPF.

Toyota Patent

Diesels still power the logistical backbone of the global economy, and likely will for quite some time. OEM's are still very much looking to improve those designs.
 

Recommended books for Overlanding

phsycle

Adventurer
...if you don't haul or tow. The second you put a turbo gasser under load, it loses most of its efficiency advantage.
Yeah ok. 🙄 Last month, I went on a week long trip in an F150 going over 8-9k mtn passes, towing a 5k lb enclosed trailer. 12mpg and power is incredible compared to my old Toyota V8. Just as efficient (actually, more efficient as my V8 was in single digit MPG), and much much more power.
 

Dalko43

Explorer
Yeah ok. 🙄 Last month, I went on a week long trip in an F150 going over 8-9k mtn passes, towing a 5k lb enclosed trailer. 12mpg and power is incredible compared to my old Toyota V8. Just as efficient (actually, more efficient as my V8 was in single digit MPG), and much much more power.
I don't know why you'd try to argue this point...this is a well known aspect of turbo gasoline engines. When you put those engines under load, they burn through fuel very quickly, often more quickly than what you'd see with a naturally aspirated v8 of similar output. Comparing your new Ford F-150 to an "older" Toyota is hardly a scientific comparison.

But FYI, TFL Truck did do a comparison. Low and behold, the 5.0l v8 Coyote F-150 got better mpg than the 3.5l ecoboost: TFL F-150 V8 vs Ecoboost

 

roving1

Well-known member
And FWIW, I think the modern diesel offerings (2.8l and 3.0l duramax, 3.0l powerstroke, 3.0l ecodiesel) have come a long way in terms of emissions reliability. There is even a rumor that Toyota may come out with a diesel design which reduces, or all together removes, the need for DEF and DPF.


Diesels still power the logistical backbone of the global economy, and likely will for quite some time. OEM's are still very much looking to improve those designs.
The 3.0 has not had nearly enough exposure to form any opinion on emissions reliability or any reliability metric in the wild and the fact you have to yank the engine at 150K to change an oil belt is a complete non starter for anyone except short term owners.

The 3.0 has delightful power characteristics and is a true pleasure to drive. But it has absolutely nothing to do with the commercial use diesel engines powering the economy.
 

plainjaneFJC

Goofball
I don't know why you'd try to argue this point...this is a well known aspect of turbo gasoline engines. When you put those engines under load, they burn through fuel very quickly, often more quickly than what you'd see with a naturally aspirated v8 of similar output. Comparing your new Ford F-150 to an "older" Toyota is hardly a scientific comparison.

But FYI, TFL Truck did do a comparison. Low and behold, the 5.0l v8 Coyote F-150 got better mpg than the 3.5l ecoboost: TFL F-150 V8 vs Ecoboost

If you can keep your foot out of the boost they will do better than the v8, the tfl test is entertaining, but not practical.
 

phsycle

Adventurer
I don't know why you'd try to argue this point...this is a well known aspect of turbo gasoline engines. When you put those engines under load, they burn through fuel very quickly, often more quickly than what you'd see with a naturally aspirated v8 of similar output. Comparing your new Ford F-150 to an "older" Toyota is hardly a scientific comparison.

But FYI, TFL Truck did do a comparison. Low and behold, the 5.0l v8 Coyote F-150 got better mpg than the 3.5l ecoboost: TFL F-150 V8 vs Ecoboost

The fact that you site TFL as your data source says a lot. Get back to me when you’ve actually done it yourself.
By the way, current 5.7 V8 would fare just as worse. In fact, I’ve towed with that as well as two of my brothers have late model Tundras. Much peppier but not any better in MPG.
 
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Dalko43

Explorer
The 3.0 has delightful power characteristics and is a true pleasure to drive. But it has absolutely nothing to do with the commercial use diesel engines powering the economy.
Never said that the 3.0l diesel was powering the economy...I said that, in general, diesel engines power the world economy.

The fact that you site TFL as your data source says a lot. Get back to me when you’ve actually done it yourself.

By the way, current 5.7 V8 would fare just as worse. In fact, I’ve towed with that as well as two of my brothers have late model Tundras. Much peppier but not any better in MPG.
I'd rather rely on people who actually make an effort to do apples-to-apples comparisons rather than on the typical anecdotal nonsense that you find so prevalent on the internet.

I'm also relying on my own experience with turbo gasolines, which matches up with what TFL, and others, have observed...that mpg degrades very quickly once you put the engine under load.

By the way, TFL has put the Tundra through the same test, where it got very similar mpg to the Ford.

 

phsycle

Adventurer
I'd rather rely on people who actually make an effort to do apples-to-apples comparisons rather than on the typical anecdotal nonsense that you find so prevalent on the internet.

I'm also relying on my own experience with turbo gasolines, which matches up with what TFL, and others, have observed...that mpg degrades very quickly once you put the engine under load.

By the way, TFL has put the Tundra through the same test, where it got very similar mpg to the Ford.
You’re such a mag racer. Tundra test was on a different day! Different season! 🤣

How much towing have you done? What turbo gas engine are you talking about?

By the way, just watched the first video. Seriously, the V8 was a 2WD! And 3.15 gearing. Ecoboost was 4wd and 3.55. And still got MPG difference of only 0.5. Wow 🙄

How about them apples?
 
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