Colorado / Canyon bent frame

I blame the BAgoodbich sticker. Should have put it on the front or side and it never would have happened.

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CrazyDrei

Space Monkey
Ford Tempo can tow that trailer without bending the frame, I wonder how he really did it, tree stump with a static tow strap, tug of war, tried moving a mobile home...

I want that sticker...
 

dirtdobberoffroad

Well-known member
Ford Tempo can tow that trailer without bending the frame, I wonder how he really did it, tree stump with a static tow strap, tug of war, tried moving a mobile home...

I want that sticker...
I was thinking the same thing...Facebook blew this post up and the comments are hard to read, too much assuming on t FB.
 

shade

Well-known member
I think there's more to what happened than just towing a trailer. I'm not saying the driver did or didn't do anything wrong, but aside from everything else, this wasn't a drive down a smooth, paved road. If this incident occurred on pavement, with all conditions within the manufacturer's limits, it would be much easier to fault GM. Either way, it sucks to be the owner of a new, undriveable truck.

It's worth remembering that the Colorado is a modern, light duty truck, just like so many other makes in the same class. Any frame can be bent, and midsize pickups have the lowest ratings, so which frames are most easily damaged? Maybe there is something inherently wrong with the Colorado's frame, but I won't be surprised if GM is able to defend their position. Modern trucks have many advantages over old ones, but I think there's more strength in the old frames when it comes to towing.
 

CampStewart

Observer
I think there's more to what happened than just towing a trailer. I'm not saying the driver did or didn't do anything wrong, but aside from everything else, this wasn't a drive down a smooth, paved road. If this incident occurred on pavement, with all conditions within the manufacturer's limits, it would be much easier to fault GM. Either way, it sucks to be the owner of a new, undriveable truck.

It's worth remembering that the Colorado is a modern, light duty truck, just like so many other makes in the same class. Any frame can be bent, and midsize pickups have the lowest ratings, so which frames are most easily damaged? Maybe there is something inherently wrong with the Colorado's frame, but I won't be surprised if GM is able to defend their position. Modern trucks have many advantages over old ones, but I think there's more strength in the old frames when it comes to towing.
Why do you believe that the owner of the truck is claiming that this just happened driving down a smooth road? What kind of analysis have you done to determine that newer truck frames are weaker than those designed years ago?
 
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