Chevy Colorado ZR2 Bison, COMING SOON!

ttengineer

Adventurer
Toyota trucks are long overdue for interior upgrades.

And yes they both need diesel options, as does the rest of the Toyota 4x4 line.


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David Trest

New member
Taking out the Nav and Duramax brings it down to mid / high 50's. Comparable to a TRD Pro here. Still an insane amount of money for a little truck. That's pretty much Power Wagon money.
Because of connections, I could a ZR2 Bison with Duramax for just a bit over 48k before taxes, local fees, etc. And no dealer markup.

The insane thing is I could spend a few more Gs and get a pretty nice 2500 if I wanted to. Granted that means it's without things like front lockers, offroad suspension, armor, etc.
 

Wallygator

Adventurer
Because of connections, I could a ZR2 Bison with Duramax for just a bit over 48k before taxes, local fees, etc. And no dealer markup.

The insane thing is I could spend a few more Gs and get a pretty nice 2500 if I wanted to. Granted that means it's without things like front lockers, offroad suspension, armor, etc.
I hear ya. My dad retired from GM and I can get a pretty good deal. After the bailout crap and now the plant closing without paying us back, I have not bought a GM in years. I guess I'm dumb that way, but have not really liked any of their vehicles until the ZR2. Then look at the Tradesman Power Wagon for just about the same price. But 11-14 mpg. Then look at the XL Ranger dbl cab with a couple options for probably less than $30K...I wish there was a perfect vehicle. None exist. An it's going to take a lot for me to ditch this 4Runner, but I always look.
 

Clutch

<---Pass
Well the first thing would be to stop trying to make it a car and scrap the Camry motor. Put a truck motor in it. Next, fully boxed frame. Rear disc brakes. Increase capability/hauling/towing. Diesel?, yes please. The Tacoma also needs it's ergonomics revamped. Then we can get into the fantasy stuff and say solid front axle. :D(never happen)

An I agree I would love for a 1st gen size truck to be available again but I believe those days are long gone.
So basically bring the HiLux back to the US. :D

I am ok with the ergonomics, as the Tacoma fits me very well...everything else feels "foreign" to me.
 

Clutch

<---Pass
Toyota trucks are long overdue for interior upgrades.

And yes they both need diesel options, as does the rest of the Toyota 4x4 line.
Thought the interiors on the Tacoma and Tundra are pretty nice, feel pretty up to date to me. Not sure why so many have issue with it. Heck the Tundra looks nearly the same as the new F150 interior wise, yet no complains about the F150.

Agree with you on the diesel, but I have no interest in modern diesels...no real advantage at the end of the day. The new small diesels really aren't that fast. Better fuel economy, but won't save you any money for cost of ownership.
 
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Clutch

<---Pass
I found the tacoma trd pro way to small interior wise. I am 5'10" average build and it felt really cramped to me.
Toyota interiors have always been small...compared to a fullsize truck. Why I like them, feels like driving a toy (no pun intended). What I don't like about the newer ones, especially the 3rd Gen the exterior proportions have grown, with no advantages. Interior bed dimensions are even smidge smaller than a 1st gen. With the bloated-ness of it, might be considered a disadvantage now running certain trails. Wish they would go back to making mini-trucks.

The Colorado's interior feels like it was designed by Fisher-Price. The shift lever looks like they pulled it from an 80's Camaro. Interior dimensions are pretty close to a Tacoma's and Rangers. So no real major size difference between the three.

New Ranger's interior is looking good though.
 
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tacollie

Explorer
The Tacoma lacks in payload to mpg ratio. If you are going to have low payload you better get real good mpgs. I'm fine with the interior and drum brakes. I like that you can get front and rear lockers from GM. That is really cool. I have no interest in the bison but I like that GM is doing it. A manual shift tcase, coil rear suspension, and front and rear lockers would be sweet.
 

Clutch

<---Pass
The Tacoma lacks in payload to mpg ratio. If you are going to have low payload you better get real good mpgs. I'm fine with the interior and drum brakes. I like that you can get front and rear lockers from GM. That is really cool. I have no interest in the bison but I like that GM is doing it. A manual shift tcase, coil rear suspension, and front and rear lockers would be sweet.
Ya know, the payload was decent when it was smaller. If it stayed small and they worked on the mpg's instead of the weight gain and exterior bloat... ;) :)

No interest in the Bison, but like the GM. Couple nit-picky things keeps me from trying one. Rear shock location, low hanging fruit of a spare tire, no manual trans...are a few things. That and Midsizes have gotten too big (no matter the brand), imo.
 

Wallygator

Adventurer
Ya know, the payload was decent when it was smaller. If it stayed small and they worked on the mpg's instead of the weight gain and exterior bloat... ;)

The smaller Taco was the Hilux frame, right?. One thing is for sure they don't make near the same truck that 1st gen was.
 

Clutch

<---Pass
The smaller Taco was the Hilux frame, right?. One thing is for sure they don't make near the same truck that 1st gen was.
The 1994 and earlier trucks were rebadged HiLuxes. The 1st gen Tacoma did share some components with the overseas 6th gen HiLux. IIRC the Hilux got a fully boxed frame and the Tacoma is basically 3/4's of the way boxed. Full floating rear axle on the Hilux, that and no diesel for the US market. Front suspension and steering was different on the 6th Gen Hilux, it retained torsion bar, for the steering was recirculating ball, and similar sized tie-rods were used like the solid axle before it. Where the Tacoma went coil-over, rack & pinion. It was the same chassis as the '86-94 US trucks, with a Tacoma style body.

Small jist of it, more detail in the link.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Hilux#Sixth_generation_(N140,_N150,_N160,_N170;_1997–2005)

Toyota_Hilux_N170_001.JPG
 
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toylandcruiser

Expedition Leader
The 1994 and earlier trucks were rebadged HiLuxes. The 1st gen Tacoma did share some components with the overseas 6th gen HiLux. IIRC the Hilux got a fully boxed frame and the Tacoma is basically 3/4's of the way boxed. Full floating rear axle on the Hilux, that and no diesel for the US market. Front suspension and steering was different on the 6th Gen Hilux, it retained torsion bar, for the steering was recirculating ball, and similar sized tie-rods were used like the solid axle before it. Where the Tacoma went coil-over, rack & pinion. It was the same chassis as the '86-94 US trucks, with a Tacoma style body.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Hilux#Sixth_generation_(N140,_N150,_N160,_N170;_1997–2005)

Toyota_Hilux_N170_001.JPG
The hilux never had a full float. Only the land cruisers had full floats
 

orangeTJ

Explorer
I still hate the seats in the Colorado. There's a huge thread over on the Colorado / Canyon forum about the bottom seat cushion.
For some people, your left thigh compresses the cushion enough that it bottoms out on the left prtion of the plastic seat surround, which then puts pressure on the back side of your thigh.... and gets really annoying after 10 minutes.
 

Crazy Schooner

Fortune's A Mistress
I never had that problem with my Colorado. I found it much more comfortable compared to the Tacomas we have at work. I can't sit in a Tacoma for more then a few hours without needing to stretch my legs. The floor is too high, so my knees are always bent at a weird angle sitting in those things.
 
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