Can we talk coffee brewing?

ChadHahn

Adventurer
I have a Toddy (https://www.amazon.com/Toddy-THM-Cold-Brew-System/dp/B0006H0JVW) cold brew coffee maker that I use exclusively to make coffee. I add two ounces of the concentrate to 6 ounces of hot water and I have a cup of coffee. The taste is so much smoother than drip brewed coffee. When camping I put the concentrate in a jar and dispense as needed. I only need a way to make hot water. It's fast and like I say, the taste is much less bitter.

Before that when I camped I used a Coleman (https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000015167-Camping-Coffee-Maker/dp/B001K7IDVU) coffee maker. It was big and fragile and took for ever but made a good cup of drip coffee.
 

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TooGouda

New member
So I have done all the methods and honestly keep coming back to the most simple.
Aeropress, pourover w/filter, or a drip device (like the gsi coffee rocket) are the smallest to pack, easiest to use, and with least cleanup while still making coffee with preground or fresh ground beans. If you want to try and be a little fancy and fun you can get a mini turkish coffee pot. its more similar to cowboy coffee done up espresso style almost but if done right you don't get much in the way of grounds in your cup.

if you could care less if your coffee is 2 hrs old from a truck stop diner, then just get some instant stuff and call it a day. maybe add in some flavorings of some kind like hot coco, or various creamers.

if you are at all a snob but want it to be easy, then the options i use are about the best i have found. no special percolator pot, or french press needed. You can get french press kits that work pretty well for the jetboil etc if thats the stove you use. but outside of those purpose built kits to make a new use for an existing piece of gear there isn't much else in the percolator / french press world that doesn't take up a good chunk of space.
 

DortchRules

New member
Throw coarsely ground coffee into a vessel, pour in water just below boiling temperature, wait 4 minutes, then drink. Simple.
You will get some coffee grounds in your sips, but the coffee will have as good a flavor as any infusion, like a French press. If you do not want the grounds, then things get more complicated and you need to add some kind of filter to your system…which is what coffee cones with filters or French presses do. If you do not drink your coffee right away, it will begin to get overextracted after about 6 minutes (2 minutes of drink time), which is another good reason to filter it in the first place.
 

Worms

New member
DortchRules, I'm glad to see someone else that keeps it simple! I've got an old-style enamel coffee pot and with the right grind it infuses and settles pretty quickly, leaving very little ground coffee in the cup.
 

Mtn Mike

Observer
Pour over for the win.

We've got 5 or 6 Melitta plastic pour overs floating around between our house, camper and cabin. And a GSI silicon pour over for traveling.

Every brew method gives the coffee distinct tastes and texture... I appreciate the taste of french press, percolators, espresso. But we always go back to our pour overs because there's virtually no mess to clean, it tastes good, and it's easy.
 

chacomaya

New member
I have an Aeropress and am not all that impressed with it. It's a bit fussy. I like the GSI Glacier Stainless Javapress, personally.
 

workerdrone

Fulltimer
Recent convert to the Aeropress here - got one for a few bucks on local craigslist and after making french press for many years I'm a convert - fast, delicious, easy cleanup

BTW been using it at home and have found you can re-use the filters for a long time if you don't tear them - a quick rinse under running water, lay them on a paper towel, they're dry and ready to re-use in short order.

Been using the same 4 filters now for weeks 😄 Am I cheap or what?

Camping I probably wouldn't bother with the re-use
 
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Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
Recent convert to the Aeropress here - got one for a few bucks on local craigslist and after making french press for many years I'm a convert - fast, delicious, easy cleanup

BTW been using it at home and have found you can re-use the filters for a long time if you don't tear them - a quick rinse under running water, lay them on a paper towel, they're dry and ready to re-use in short order.

Been using the same 4 filters now for weeks 😄 Am I cheap or what?

Camping I probably wouldn't bother with the re-use
Agreed that easy cleanup is a key feature here. We dry-camp w/o a grey water system, so any coffee system that requires rinsing grounds is a bummer for us.

While camping I'll reuse a filter once or twice in the same morning, but yes, I'm not going to take the time to dry it and reuse it the next day.
 

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Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
Yeah, but then you're back to rinsing.

I'm against leaving grounds behind in the campsite, and I won't want to rinse water into my trash bag. Paper filters work great.
 

workerdrone

Fulltimer
With the french press I always cleaned up by adding some water, swirling, and then throwing the mix 30 feet out and into the air - try and find a trace... does that make me a bad person?
 
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