Camper Option

Greenbarn

Member
I found a used camper close to home and I am considering this as an alternative to the building one myself. I did a quick photo edit of a stock image onto our truck.
Jayco.jpgfloorplan.pngTruck Small.jpg
I see several advantage:
1) Cost with a used price of $10 000.00 Canadian I doubt I build it for that.
2) Time I am confident we could be up and running this winter and be able to head south for Christmas.
Disadvantages:
1) Well it sure is not pretty
2) Very High
3) Not well winterized.
Our plan would be to mount this to a flat deck with Container Twitst Locks and Container Cast Corners.
image.pngimage-1.png

I appreciate the expertise of this group in our planning.
Dan

Size
Length of Trailer Cabin 13'5"
Width: 85"
Hight from bottom of frame rails approximately 85"

Weights
Unloaded Vehicle Weight (lbs) View Definition 2340
Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (lbs) View Definition 2995
Cargo Carrying Capacity (lbs) View Definition 655

TANK CAPACITIES
Fresh Water Capacity (gals) 10
Water Heater 6
Gray Waste Water Capacity (gals) 15
Black Waste Water Capacity (gals) 9
 

Ford Prefect

Expedition Leader
I think that is an awesome idea! I have seen others do it and found it to be excellently suited for their needs.

I would be sure I consider a few things, obviously you are already thinking on these lines. Weight and GVRW is a bid deal for sure. The other one I would consider, and this is for each individual user to determine, is how long will it last with the type of use I plan to put it through. IE If you are planning to bounce that thing down half a dozen 4x4 trails every month, then I doubt the trailer will hold up for long. Outside of the custom market, like DRV, New Horizon, Provost, etc (massive motorhomes and 5th wheels) nearly the entire remainder of campers made/sold in North America are meant for people who will use them one weekend per month for a maximum of three months per year. Ergo, they look pretty but will not hold up.

That said, if you are going to take good care of it, and be gentle running down roads and occasional 4x4 use, then I would think this has a very decent chance of working out well for you. Most of the similar efforts that I have seen are with fiberglass shells, rather than a full on twigs and sticks camper. This may not be a factor, but it seems to be a commonality on the FGs Mind, I have seen several FEs with massive slide on bed campers and they seem to do great.

Sorry, not much help, but I do think that this may end up being a pretty nice rig if you can work out the mounting and such!

Best of luck!
 

jetstreamin

Active member
I agree with the post above, sadly the way North American campers are made is for tarmac use (fibreglass and wood sheds) and when they see a dirt road they start to self destruct! That said there may be some merit in acquiring this and stripping out the interior and appliances to use in your own more robust box. As i am finding out on our build, buying the fridge, heating, cooking, plumbing and electrical all ads up fast! if you can use the camper as a doner vessel this may be a good option...
 

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