Camper Interior 87 Toyota van

Team Liquid

New member
Wow! Team Liquid, I would love a nice-looking 4x4 like you have there -- only I don't want righthand drive. Or better yet, one with sunroofs... Lots of good ideas on your blog, too! Those drawers you've got in the galley -- where'd you get them?
Thanks for the kudos on my van snoozy. I'm pretty stoked on it. But as far as the bed platform and blog, not mine. Only a tool that I am using to pull some ideas for my build. That concept was the brainchild of the guys over @ Project DinoEvo. Their base rig is a Mitsubishi Delica.
 

snoozy

New member
Yeah, I saw it was a Delica. They look a lot like our Toy'vans, but narrower. Terrific for snootering around in urban traffic. Fine for one, but I think for two it might be a little tight.

I've never gone to desert-y and blowy places like Baja, so perhaps I'm myopic in my moderate Pac NW environs...

And yes, it would be nice to be able to make tea in the morning without getting out of bed, but for me the advantages of a rear galley override that drawback.
 

fog cutter

Adventurer
i would build for the area i'd be most, and then adapt as the circle grew.

not sure these things ever become finished, just at different stages of completion.
 

coronan

New member
No real progress for the last few weeks. I've been putting in 30 hours a week in my off time helping with a remodel. Next week I have company due in.
The van has been in haul mode. And despite my large counter top. I can still fit a wheel barrow in via the slider door.

Also with a little down time at work I've whittled away at a spare tire carrier. When i stepped up to 225/75/15 the spare no longer fit in under the van.


So a 6 gal water tank will take its place under the van and help soften up the rear suspension.

The good news is I'm using the dorm fridge at the job site. It gets cold and does not cycle too much but has uneven temps inside. A killawatt is in the mail. The left and right side (now front and back after being flipped into a chest) are where the Condenser coils are and the inside walls are a little warm.
Lots of googling has shown that the Homebrew beer maker forums have the best info on modding these fridges for increased performance.
 

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dar395

Adventurer
It is nice to have the option to cook inside in bad/cold or windy weather. At least be able to boil water for coffee and oatmeal etc and do the messy cooking outside.

Dan, I'm with you Oats-N-Coffee on a wet morning in, but always cook the squeaking or squashed items out.
 

fog cutter

Adventurer
i agree it's nice to stay warm and dry - at least for the first hour of the day.

the size of the vehicle may dictate the practicality of cooking or other necessary activities. i cannot imagine dodging a boiling pot o' ramen noodles from the prone position. if you're outside, at least you would have a fighting chance to step away and a place to go.

i've seen folks set up the Jetboil from their sleeping bag and get away with it, but i need room to move when it comes to flames. ever see an alcohol stove fire in a small galley boat?
 

coronan

New member
The dorm fridge is getting ready to go under the knife. Kill-a-watt is here. I'll be plugging in the fridge and leaving it in the sun outside. Highs have been in the 90's here in Reno. I'll start bench marking this week.

I'm leaving this link here for my notes.
http://www.thermaxxjackets.com/insulation-ratings-r-factor-k-factor-c-factor/

Most commercial fridges have 2 to 2.5" of insulation.
Being that space is limited I may sacrifice a few cubic inches and add insulation to the inside of the fridge.

Goals will be eliminate heat soak from the condenser and compressor. Increase temp consistency inside fridge.

Right now the condenser (hot coil) is in the sides of the fridge, Releasing heat the the outside surface. I can either add heat sinks and a fan to the outside and duct it outside the van. Or do surgery to extract the condensers (i think there are 2) and blow a fan on them directly. (more work but probably more efficient on space).
 

coronan

New member
Next phase, I'm looking for good examples of interior lighting. Enough light to find your stuff but not hit you in the eye. I guess indirect is what I am envisioning.

Also the gf really wants the sink to have water in the winter. I'm wondering if I insulate it and run some coolant hose Under the tank; is there some kind thematic valve that can keep it from getting to hot????
 

Recommended books for Overlanding

DzlToy

Explorer
Direct lighting in a small space can be quite harsh. LED's do not dim well, despite what some vendors will tell you. They only decrease 10-30% before losing the power required to run. It is NOT like dimming a 110V incandescent light bulb in your house.

One solution is a rope lighting behind a moulding or trim piece and another is a small gooseneck type of fixture that allows light to be directed as desired.




Made in Michigan, 12 LED gooseneck lamps: http://littlite.com/products/category/10
 
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