Camper for the Cold

Alloy

Well-known member
Our 35' trailer provides allot of room to move around during the short winter days.

We've done temps below 0F with everything (battery/ water system) working. At 20F the thermal transfer of the alum wall framing and windows becomes an issue....condensation then ice. There's allot of (see pic) aluminum.

Is there a production camper (less room but easier to travel with) that will handle -10 to -20F without the thermal transfer issues or should we be looking at a custom build?


flir_20200113T095624[1].jpg
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
-20 is pushing it for pretty much any production camper.

That said, if your only real issue is condensation and ice-dams, have you tried increasing your air exchange?

At those temps, the outside air is VERY dry.
 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
Fiberglass/ foam style campers maybe? Basically think Yeti cooler on wheels with windows and accommodations. Oliver trailers?
 

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09Busaman

Member
We have a cold weather package on our Winnie, camped to temps as low as zero, but not -20. Not sure how it would do at that temp, but I do not remember anything other than the window frames with a little condensation.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
-20 is pushing it for pretty much any production camper.

That said, if your only real issue is condensation and ice-dams, have you tried increasing your air exchange?

At those temps, the outside air is VERY dry.
Opening a vent works down to 15F. Below 15F the aluminum window frames pick up moisture faster than it can be vented or the dehumidifier removes it.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
Bigfoot Camper with winter package.
Thanks .....spoke with Bigfoot about doing a factory tour. The 2500s have (not the 1500s) a winter package.

Someone elese suggested Northern Lite. These are suppose to be "tested to" -20C
 

billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
Vancouver, so your big problem is likely moisture build up while home followed by travel to colder climates. I've seen people up north of 60 living in trailers like yours with no problems but then everything is incredibly dry at 40 below.

Not sure a "better" built camper will be much different. You need to eliminate the moisture.... which likely means no cooking.
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
Opening a vent works down to 15F. Below 15F the aluminum window frames pick up moisture faster than it can be vented or the dehumidifier removes it.
Powered vent?
You really need a powered air exchange of some sort.

In our severe cold trips (well below zero) we have little to no problem with moisture/condensation with a couple of windows cracked, and ceiling exhaust fan running.
There is still some, and Id argue that there will ALWAYS be some at those temps, but it is minimal. (y)
 

redthies

Renaissance Redneck
Someone elese suggested Northern Lite. These are suppose to be "tested to" -20C
We’ve done a couple of winters fulltime in our 2017 Northern Lite in Whistler. I recall it getting down to -25 and windchill on top of that without any issues. NL windows are double pane from the factory, and I believe Bigfoot are single pane. Maybe double with the cold weather package.

If you are driving up to the Okanagon, you might as well look at NL as well. They are in Kelowna.
 

Photomike

White Turtle Adventures
Had an older NL and loved it. Sold it because I could not go from the front to the back, not because of the unit or the build. -30c and no issues but I did go dry camping below freezing. Also made some storm windows as my windows were single pane. The newer NL's are even better,

There are a number of trailers with Arctic Packages as well Arctic Fox is one.

If you are looking for anything for the extreme cold stay away from slides. A big source of heat loss and moving them in extreme cold is not fun nor easy.
 
Northern Lite is well insulated and 4 season, and highly rated. in my opinion, a bit nicer than Bigfoot. In either camper, you’re going to burn through some propane In serious cold weather.
 

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Alloy

Well-known member
Had an older NL and loved it. Sold it because I could not go from the front to the back, not because of the unit or the build. -30c and no issues but I did go dry camping below freezing. Also made some storm windows as my windows were single pane. The newer NL's are even better,

There are a number of trailers with Arctic Packages as well Arctic Fox is one.

If you are looking for anything for the extreme cold stay away from slides. A big source of heat loss and moving them in extreme cold is not fun nor easy.
Don't want slides on the camper but we have them on the trailer. This is a FLIR of the bottom of the slide from a few years ago. After seeing this we cut pcs of 1/2" close (like packaging foam) cell foam to go here.
Bottom of Slide.jpg

We also found that snow turns to ice then freezes to the TPO roof membrane so we lay the same 1/2 foam on top of the slides.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
Northern Lite is well insulated and 4 season, and highly rated. in my opinion, a bit nicer than Bigfoot. In either camper, you’re going to burn through some propane In serious cold weather.
NL has longer beds too but from what I found so far 2500 Series Bigfoot has 1 1/2" foam vs the NL is 1" for all models.

In winter I carry an extra 50lb cylinder.
 
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