Cabinets with Aluminum Extrusion bars

FourWheelOverland

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Hey guys, I am looking to build a small kitchen cabinet that rolls out the window of my Four wheel camper. I am looking at using the Aluminum Extrusion bars with t slots. I have found a few good articles on that material, but I am curious what everyone has used for fill panels. I would like something that would slide in the channels in the center of the bars. I am thinking about a composite/plastic panel, or aluminum? I do not want to use wood.

Hoping for some feedback, or link to some builds.
 

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The Artisan

Adventurer
Have you looked at the PVC foamboard products?
That is what I will be using with a 1x1 angle internal exo cage and dovetailed seams on the celtec
Overkill but wont break. Also I am only facing areas that will be seen. My walls make up the rest of the cabinet, to save weight.
Kevin
 

Scoutman

Explorer
I use these aluminum extrusions a lot at work and some at home. The challenge I've found for spec'ing panels that fit in the channels is getting a material that is a true .250" thickness. Everything after that is a balance of your budget or how robust you want it to be. I'm making the assumption you're talking about the 10 series extrusion (1").

The birch plywood is only .203" thick which leaves an almost .050" gap between the panel and extrusion. It's cheap (at only ~$20 for a 4'x8' sheet) and would be a good option for test fitting before cutting more expensive material.
Coroplast, ABS, HDPE, acrylic, laminate flooring, laminated aluminum panels, etc. all are around .200"-.236" even though they seem to be advertised as "1/4".
Note: .236" = 6 mm and seems to be the most common

Another option is to find a 3/16" material and run a panel gasket around the border of the panel. This lets you run a thinner (ie. lighter/cheaper) panel but has the extra cost of the gasket. It may cut down on rattles for cabinets built in a van.

My original plan was to use ABS plastic but the thickness has me hesitating. I use a material at work called Garolite but it's expensive and heavy, 2 things I don't want for my home project. For now I'm using cardboard as my prototype panels to make sure everything fits.

20200623_203204.jpg
 

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jgaz

Adventurer
I use these aluminum extrusions a lot at work and some at home. The challenge I've found for spec'ing panels that fit in the channels is getting a material that is a true .250" thickness. Everything after that is a balance of your budget or how robust you want it to be. I'm making the assumption you're talking about the 10 series extrusion (1").

The birch plywood is only .203" thick which leaves an almost .050" gap between the panel and extrusion. It's cheap (at only ~$20 for a 4'x8' sheet) and would be a good option for test fitting before cutting more expensive material.
Coroplast, ABS, HDPE, acrylic, laminate flooring, laminated aluminum panels, etc. all are around .200"-.236" even though they seem to be advertised as "1/4".
Note: .236" = 6 mm and seems to be the most common

Another option is to find a 3/16" material and run a panel gasket around the border of the panel. This lets you run a thinner (ie. lighter/cheaper) panel but has the extra cost of the gasket. It may cut down on rattles for cabinets built in a van.

My original plan was to use ABS plastic but the thickness has me hesitating. I use a material at work called Garolite but it's expensive and heavy, 2 things I don't want for my home project. For now I'm using cardboard as my prototype panels to make sure everything fits.

View attachment 595328
Have you tried looking for 1/4 hardboard (Masonite) tempered on BOTH sides.

I just went out to the shed and measured a small piece of scrap and it’s an almost exact 1/4”. I purchased the 4’x8’ sheet for a project while I was still in living in Michigan. I found it at a small, local, lumber yard.

I haven’t looked for it here in Phoenix but I’ve never seen it any big box store anywhere. Maybe a local (to you) plywood supplier?

One drawback I can see would be the dark color for the inside of a camper, just my opinion
 

Scoutman

Explorer
My camp kitchen will be in the back of my truck and may occasionally get wet. Masonite is a no go for me but would be fine for inside a van.
 
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