Building our box out of wood?

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
I think the 4x4s would work better to resist shear, with the greater surface area than 2x3s, and especially when two plywood sheets are butted up against each other and glued-and-screwed to a 4x4.
Fiberglass kinda makes that irrelevant. Wooden boats spend almost 100% their time getting pounded while on the water and they don't use 4" wide timber for much other then the keel.

Also, if you put liquid nails on a standard truss top cord and screw down the plywood roof decking, the screws become irrelivant once the glue dries. You won't be able to remove the plywood with out completely destroying/delaminating it. Once the glue bonds, it's not letting go.
 
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s.e.charles

Well-known member
ok, then. it's settled. 4 x 4s with intermittent 2 x 3s flat layering of glued screwed & tattooed 4 x 8 plywood and fiberglassed over with insulated 3/ 4" 16' sheets cut into 8' long pieces for easier handling.

did I miss anything?

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MTVR

Well-known member
Also, if you put liquid nails on a standard truss top cord and screw down the plywood roof decking, the screws become irrelivant once the glue dries. You won't be able to remove the plywood with out completely destroying/delaminating it. Once the glue bonds, it's not letting go.
Yup...
 

1000arms

Well-known member
Fiberglass kinda makes that irrelevant. Wooden boats spend almost 100% their time getting pounded while on the water and they don't use 4" wide timber for much other then the keel.

Also, if you put liquid nails on a standard truss top cord and screw down the plywood roof decking, the screws become irrelivant once the glue dries. You won't be able to remove the plywood with out completely destroying/delaminating it. Once the glue bonds, it's not letting go.
Maybe I missed it, but I don't think the OP has stated that he will positively, absolutely, 100% certain, fiberglass the box. :cool: Maybe the OP is planning on using his rig to remove low-hanging branches on US Forest Service roads? :)

Yup! Glued and screwed! The screws hold things in place while the glue dries!

The OP is seeking options. One option is that he could quickly, and easily, using skills he already has, glue and screw together, a 16' long x 8' high x 8' wide camper, using 4x4s and plywood and rigid insulation, that his rig can easily handle. :)
 

1000arms

Well-known member
ok, then. it's settled. 4 x 4s with intermittent 2 x 3s flat layering of glued screwed & tattooed 4 x 8 plywood and fiberglassed over with insulated 3/ 4" 16' sheets cut into 8' long pieces for easier handling.

did I miss anything?
Yes you did! You missed the reference to using two 20' containers, with one stacked upon the other, and the OP telling people the top one is his roof-top tent, but, I'll forgive you, because that reference is in another of the OP's threads. :cool:
 

MTVR

Well-known member
Yes you did! You missed the reference to using two 20' containers, with one stacked upon the other, and the OP telling people the top one is his roof-top tent, but, I'll forgive you, because that reference is in another of the OP's threads. :cool:
Lol, I don't recall saying that...
 

1000arms

Well-known member
Lol, I don't recall saying that...
You didn't. I did! :)
Get two shipping containers. Stack one on the other and just tell everyone that the top one is your roof-top-tent! :cool:

If you do use a 20' container, I suggest thinking about having a "deck/porch", on top of the container, to be able to sit/eat/cook with potential for a phenomenal view. You might be high enough up to catch a breeze that doesn't touch the ground in some areas, which is nice for keeping the bugs away.
For those not familiar with one of the OP's other threads, go to: https://expeditionportal.com/forum/threads/go-big-or-go-home.213984/post-2760096
 

1000arms

Well-known member
Yes you did! You missed the reference to using two 20' containers, with one stacked upon the other, and the OP telling people the top one is his roof-top tent, but, I'll forgive you, because that reference is in another of the OP's threads. :cool:
Lol, I don't recall saying that...
You didn't. I did! :)
Get two shipping containers. Stack one on the other and just tell everyone that the top one is your roof-top-tent! :cool: ...
For those not familiar with one of the OP's other threads, go to: https://expeditionportal.com/forum/threads/go-big-or-go-home.213984/post-2760096
But its a good idea worthy of 10-15 pages silly ExPo blabber.
If you use the doubled-up 20' container idea, in the few parts of the US where you could legally drive, you could rent out the top, or bottom 20' container camper, and live in the other, but, then, you wouldn't be able to get much out of the old adage "if you don't like your neighbors, just move"! :cool:

Thanks for getting it started Verkstad! :cool:
 

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Alloy

Well-known member
For what its worth...

Not a single screw holding this wooden box together.....

Stainless brads & PL Premium ;)

I've used allot of PL and found that brads/staples/nails don't compress the sheathing onto the framing/studs. I've stripped things off and been able to pull the strips of PL off the framing/studs by hand.
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
No problems here.

6mm marine ply, 1x VG fir framing, and 18guage 1-1/8" stainless brads.

Zero problems. Though I'm not expecting the brad to do any compressing, only holding.
User provides compression. Fastener only holds until glue is set, which is a key element of an expanding polyurethane adhesive.
You need a strong enough hold to not allow the adhesive to open up the joint, only bleed out the edges.

And tests I did of this method, every single one resulted in the ply or fir breaking before the adhesive did.

Pretty incredible just how strong the bond is :oops:
 
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