Brian894x4’s Land Cruiser FZJ80 build thread.

#32
Skillet said:
Nice ride.

Mine has leather and I put some ballistic nylon seat covers on them from SOR, due to cracks. Love them, easy to clean, custom fit and very stain resistant.

They make them for all rows of seats and they color match. Just an idea.

Jeb
I am looking for a good set of seat covers. Not because the cracking is so bad, but because I get dirty out in the woods and I would rather plop my dirty behind on an easy to clean seat cover than the nice leather. I was looking at SOR and I only saw the Tuff duck seat covers. Are those the ones you have?
 
#33
Well....

Going over my game plan for the mods and here's what I've come up with so far.

I've ordered the parts for my dual battery system. Mainly a washer bottle relocation kit and FJ80 battery tray for the driver's side. The dual battery system will be just like the one in my truck utilizing a red top and yellow top Optima. In fact, I'll be taking the batteries out of my truck. A 200amp solenoid will seperate the two batteries with a three position switch controlling the solenoid. Normally, the solenoid will turn on when the ignition is on and will turn off, seperating the batteries, when the ignition is off. The solenoid will also be able to be manually turned off and on. I plan to run all my accessories off of the yellow top battery on the passenger side, so there is no risk of discharging the main starter battery.

Now...can anyone tell me what the stock amp output is on the alternator? I've heard conflicting reports that it's 80amp or 110amps. Also, I've caught some wind that there's some concern with dual batteries and solenoids on the 1FZ, because something about risking blowing up the ECU. Can anyone enlighten me? Is this any riskier than my old truck?

Accessories in the cab will be fed off off of one main feeder line from the auxilary battery which will run to two fuse panels. One near the passenger seat, to power the radios, gps, computer and cig plugs and one in the back cargo area to power additional cig plugs and anything else. The feeder line will have it's own fuse, plus it's own solenoid at the battery that can be shut off while the Cruiser sits in the garage for days at a time, in between trips to prevent trickle discharge. Something I have a problem with in the truck.

I've got to build a labtop mount for this rig, but I'm sort of at a loss, since I don't want to drill holes through the floor or the center console, but no one makes a set up that bolts up, so any ideas would be sincerely appreciated. I only need ideas for how to build and mount to the floor or console, a lower mount with Ram mount ball, as I already have the arm and upper laptop mount ready to go.

I've got pricing for installing ARBs from a local shop that did the ARB in my truck several years ago. They do good work and have decent pricing I think. I'm looking at about $1000 per axle to have an ARB installed, including parts and labor. A little under if I pull out the 3rd and a little over if I drop off the rig and walk away. Once installed, I'll do the plumbing and wiring myself. I was expecting closer to $1500 per axle at least and with this price in mind, I'm seriously considering going with ARBs front AND rear instead of just in the rear.

ARB bull bar and a WARN 9000lb winch is pretty much what I've settled on for the front end. I'd buy it all right now, except I want to keep the Cruiser low key while it has to be parked outside, until I can clear the truck out of the garage. I'm also still trying to find a good deal on used parts, but otherwise, this will set me back about $1600 for both if I have to buy new.

Tires are definately going to be MTRs. Looking at 285/75R-16s. Which will run about $1000 for a set of 5. Ouch! Well, I have a nearly brand new set of 33x12.5-15s on new black steelies that will go up for sale and cover at least part of that cost. I'm still debating on the wheels. It sure seems everyone likes keeping the LC wheels, which means they must be a good wheel. But I really like black wheels, so I'm considering just keeping the stockers and painting them black. That seems like a good way to go. Or just not even messing with them at all.

At first I wasn't going to go with a roof rack, but I really like the African Outback series that Slee sells. I like that it's full size, is extremely low profile, which means it should fit in my garage, that it's hieght adjustable and has a sunroof hatch. And of course that it's aluminum for lightweight. I think it would be a great place to store a few fuel cans and other stuff up top. Of course, it's pricey at probably around $1000 shipped, which is hard to swallow even though I'm sure it's worth it.

How to organize the cargo area is a really tough one. I know drawers would be super convienent and I could build myself some, but I hate to lose the ability to sleep back there, nor do I want to build a sleeping deck and lose the 2nd row seats, so I still have some thinking about this one.

A rooftop tent is probably in my future, hence the huge rack, but thats pretty far down on the list given it's expense.

Suspension will probably be one of the last things I do since I won't know what springs will work best until I build her up and load her down. I'm pretty settled on keeping the suspension as low as possible. Even 2.5" is probably higher than I want to go.

I also haven't mentioned sliders. That's another huge expense and is probably going to be further down the road or my I might do something custom instead, like the truck.

My truck build up literally took years, so it will kind of wierd to do this much in a matter months.
 
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#34
Brian894x4 said:
I am looking for a good set of seat covers. Not because the cracking is so bad, but because I get dirty out in the woods and I would rather plop my dirty behind on an easy to clean seat cover than the nice leather. I was looking at SOR and I only saw the Tuff duck seat covers. Are those the ones you have?

Yes, those are the ones I have. I can only say I like them alot, a great mod.
 
#35
If you still want to keep the second row seats in...I have seen people still put a drawer system in. Once you fold the second row down at night to sleep, that acts as the forward portion of the bed.

OR

Put drawers in, and when traveling without the added company, remove the second row seats (four bolts each, only takes about 5-10 minutes). And you can add the bed extension.



Also, regarding seat covers...I have friends using the Wet Okole's. Kinda pricey, but they like them. They are neoproene.

Good luck.
 

Grim Reaper

Expedition Leader
#36
Sleeping platform. The best of both worlds.

http://www.yotatech.com/showthread.php?t=38687

I am doing something similar in my 4Runner. The platform actually give more sleeping room because you are up above the folded seats (in the 4 runner at least) and the wheel wells. Then when you need the back seat you just pop off the extension and flip the seat back into its upright position.

Search sleeping platform and drawers here and you will find a bunch of posts.

Biggreen505 had a good thread going with links.
http://expeditionportal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1813&page=3&highlight=sleeping+platform
 
#38
Hand Throttle

Thanks for the kind words.

Just finished my first mod on this thing. A hand throttle from Slee Off Road.

This was FAR easier than I ever imagined to install. The cruiser is completely set up for it and it's literally just a matter of snapping this factory throttle cable in place at the gas pedal. Probably took all of 20 minutes and would go even faster, now that I've done it.

Throttle has a pull and twist knob. You twist to lock it and prevent it from pulling out accidently. Not that it's easy to pull out. It has a lot of resistence. Range of pull is very short, but that works out just fine. It looks to be designed so that you can't overrev the engine, but provides enough rpms under load to power whatever you need, most likely a winch.

Slee has awesome and very easy to understand directions in the package, with pictures. It's $51. Another more likely use for me would be to quickly charge up the auxiliery battery while the rig is sitting idling after it's been used all night long.

According to Slee there are some 1993 models that don't have a certain J bracket on the gas pedal that is needed for this for mod. I'm not sure what has to be done. It looked to me like the J bracket was welded to the gas pedal, but I could be wrong.
 

Grim Reaper

Expedition Leader
#39
On my truck is a open spot near the hand brake the I suspect is for a hand throttle. I wonder if that control would work on my truck.

Do you have a picture of how it attaches to the peddle so I can look at mine and see if it has the correct set up?
 
#40
I wondered the same and looked at my '89 truck. There's a hole in the dash as well. But I didn't see any bracket on the pedal or near the pedal that would make it an easier bolt on like on the Cruiser. Tonight, I'm going to do a short write up for my site and I'll take some pictures so you can see what it looks like.

I'm just not sure if the mounts are an integrated part of the pedal or bolt on to the pedal. There's another another bracket that mounts near the pedal and I didn't see that on my truck either. That's probably just a bolt on part.

Worst case, the cable, the bracket and possibly a new gas pedal is all that should be needed if one could source the parts from a foreign Toyota pick-up/4runner. I'm not sure how popular the hand throttle was on overseas trucks, though.
 

Grim Reaper

Expedition Leader
#41
My 86 will probably be just like your 89.

The cruise control mounts under the hood and comes back through the fire wall to pull on the top of the peddle instead of going to the throttle under the hood. the throttle has an extra slot on the bracket though so no telling how they did that on the minis.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
#42
Brian894x4 said:
I wondered the same and looked at my '89 truck. There's a hole in the dash as well. But I didn't see any bracket on the pedal or near the pedal that would make it an easier bolt on like on the Cruiser. Tonight, I'm going to do a short write up for my site and I'll take some pictures so you can see what it looks like.

I'm just not sure if the mounts are an integrated part of the pedal or bolt on to the pedal. There's another another bracket that mounts near the pedal and I didn't see that on my truck either. That's probably just a bolt on part.

Worst case, the cable, the bracket and possibly a new gas pedal is all that should be needed if one could source the parts from a foreign Toyota pick-up/4runner. I'm not sure how popular the hand throttle was on overseas trucks, though.
I've looked at my truck for this, too. There is an 'L' bracket on the front of my air plenum that looks like it could be for a second cable. I don't have cruise, so maybe that's it's intended purpose. Anyway, I wonder if it just bypasses the pedal completely and pulls the throttle body butterfly directly? I may certainly be misunderstanding how the hand throttle works on the Cruiser, too. I would expect that a Hilux would have a hand throttle option pretty commonly, since they are used often as commercial trucks that might have accessories. I dunno, maybe not.
 
#43
Sorry guys, I don't have the pics and info on the hand throttle yet, but I'll try have that up tonight.

Here's a flex pic from a woods trip yesterday, though. I think is this is pretty much max flex, since the front and rear tires were barely touching the ground.

Not bad, especially for a bone stock rig with sway bars still attached. The flex sure makes the tires look puny though. :D
 
#44
In reading through, it seems most people tend towards the ARB lockers. Why is that? Being that reliability is king, wouldn't Detroits be a better choice? No airlines/solinoids/electorics to fail, etc. Rather than starting a whole debate, what's your reason for ARBs?




Just some interesting reading on the topic...
http://www.stu-offroad.com/misc/locker-1.htm
 
#45
Shurik said:
In reading through, it seems most people tend towards the ARB lockers. Why is that? Being that reliability is king, wouldn't Detroits be a better choice? No airlines/solinoids/electorics to fail, etc. Rather than starting a whole debate, what's your reason for ARBs?




Just some interesting reading on the topic...
http://www.stu-offroad.com/misc/locker-1.htm

The biggest reasons for ARBs are drivability, safety and flexibility for different driving conditions. For a part time 4WDs like a Toyota mini-truck, having detroits or any other autolocker up front is not a big deal until you put it in 4WD, then it becomes a bear to steer and drive. Sometimes the steering is even unpredictable making it dangerous to drive at anything other than very low speeds. I used to run a lockrite up front in my PU and I absolutely hated it. Especially for my type of driving where I liked to put in 4Wheel high for moderate speed driving on the logging and dirt roads. Now if you only rockcrawl and put in in 4WD at low speeds, it's not as big of a deal, although there's some debate that it puts more stress on the front axle, which is weaker than the rear axle in many vehicles.

But in the Land Cruiser 80s, you have AWD all the time, so an autolocker up front is a REALLY bad idea. Imagine not being able to turn or make an emergency manuver on the highway. That's exactly what would happen. Even worse, based on my experience with a locked front on dirt roads, it would be unpredictable. Able to turn sometimes and not at all other times.

For the rear, the drivability issues are less noticable, but you do get occasional twitching of the rear, increased danger of major oversteer, and lots of tire chirping and locker noise. In dry weather or dirt roads, this is not a big deal at all. In rainy conditions, it's a little more of an issues, but not so much....

However, autolockers can be very dangerous in icy and snowy conditions. If you have two wheels on the rear axle lose traction on ice, the vehicle can spin out. If you have all 4 wheels lose traction, such as if it an autolocker is in both axles, then the vehicle will for all practical purposes, lose all traction with the ground and it will slide whereever gravity decides to take it, whether that be into the vehicle next to you, into a ditch or off a cliff. And even if you let off the gas, once the slide starts, it's not always possible to recover. Trust me, been there too. In those conditions, open diffs have a major safety advantage.

The thing about ARBs or Toyota electric diffs is that you get the best of all worlds and can choose which type of traction you want for a given condition whether it be open diffs for normal or icy road driving or fully locked for for a serious trail. You can even choose just locking the rear if you want, so if your stuck in snow or ice, you still have some stability from an open front diff, but traction from a locked rear diff.

Of course, the advantages of autolockers is you don't have to think about turning them on and off and you don't have hoses or wires or CPUs or pumps that can fail. I was attempting a very steep, very loose hill. One of those do or die places, where you didn't want to get stuck going up, because backing down wasn't going to be fun. Well, I forgot to engage the front ARB....and I got stuck. Had I engaged the ARB, I very likely would have made it, and let me tell you, backing down was NO fun at all. An autolocker in the rear will work just fine for most rigs, but, IMO, I would NEVER put one up front again, based on my experience and type of driving I do. But for hardcorse trails, you just have to remember to turn the switch on if you think you're going to need it.

If was seriously concerned about reliability above all else including highway drivablity, I'd probably choose a Detroit for the rear and an ARB for the front. My last set up on my Toyota PU was a Lockrite rear and ARB front and that worked out really well. Of course a Detroit would have been stronger and had I decided to keep the truck I probably would have eventually put a Detroit in there.

With this new Land Cruiser build up, highway and dirt road drivability as well as safety are paramount about all else. I will definately see and need 4 wheel drive and probably at least one locked axle on occasion, as we venture down an abandoned mine or climb a steep trail to a old fire lookout or things like that, but for rig that sees mile and miles of highway duty in between the off road stuff, the option of open diffs makes driving much nicer.
 
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