Brian894x4’s Land Cruiser FZJ80 build thread.

#16
Brian894x4 said:
The '89 truck will be hearafter known as our "legacy expedition rig" and it will be prepped and put up for sale very shortly to clear garage space for the new expedition rig.
Sad to here that the PU will be sold. But best of luck on the new build. I love the 80's. I have a co-worker that has one. Btw any idea on what you might sell the PU for? :elkgrin:
 
#17
3Bs are great but yes they just barely have enough juice in my opinion to push them along.. I had a HJ60 which was a tad better powered but still sort of a slug. A 3B in a 40 is even a little tough hate to say.. Anyway, nice rig. Been enjoying reading through all the crazy mods on your pickup on your site. Pretty neat!
 
#18
I'm really just not sure what to ask for it. If anyone has any suggestions, I'm open to them. I'm in the process of stripping some of the excess stuff off of it that I want to keep. There's a LOT of wiring in that darn thing, but much of it won't go to anything, once I remove most of my accessories, so I may be removing all that wiring as well.

What I envision to leave on the truck, is all the mechanics, such as lockers, gears, suspension, 35" MTRs, the canopy, the rear storage boxes minus a few things, front and rear bumpers, winch, snorkle, traction bar, T-case skidplate, etc. Basically all the goodies that make it a fun off road rig. I'll be throwing in all my spare parts as well.

What I will likely removed is all of the non-stock electronics, except for possibly the front and rear aux lights and of course the winch. I want to use parts of the duel battery system in the LC and frankly, it's a complicated set up that I wouldn't want to unlease on someone who isn't intimately familier with it. So, whoever buys it will probably get a one battery truck, but at least they'll have a high-amp alternator.

I think the new owner would be far better off with as little aftermarket wiring and electronics as possible, that they aren't familier with. Besides, I have a feeling whoever buys it will probably off road the crud out of it as a trail rig, rather than use it as an expedition rig.
 
#19
Brian894x4 said:
I'm in the process of stripping some of the excess stuff off of it that I want to keep. There's a LOT of wiring in that darn thing, but much of it won't go to anything, once I remove most of my accessories, so I may be removing all that wiring as well.
just a suggestion, but leave all the wiring in place, and when you remove an accessory, label the wire termination with a description of what was there and a number. The number would correspond with a circuit or switch that you could do a simple schematic on.

I am sure the next owner would appreciate all of the wiring work.

I know that I had weeks of wiring work in my Tacoma.
 
#20
Brian894x4 said:
At first, I said no lift, but now I'm leaning towards maybe an OME 2.5" medium load rear springs and heavy load front springs. Just to get things, like the cat converters out of the weeds.
I think that is a good option Brian. I had the Mediums all the way around and if I had it to do over I would go with the heavies in front. That was with a Bull Bar in front and the rear jump seats removed. If you add dual batteries and a winch to the front the rake would be even worse, but if you are adding a bunch of equipment to the back it might offset that.

Have you seen how Chris Geiger set up the rear of his 80?

http://tlc.off-road.com/tlc/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=264229

I am glad that you were patient and waited for this one, it looks cherry. :bowdown:
 
#21
Thanks Harry. And thanks for pointing it out to me. I've been all over it and I'm amazed at the condition.

I have a question regarding dust. In the spring/summer months I drive MANY miles on dirt and dusty roads. Sometimes hundreds of a miles of dirt roads in a single trip. I'm curious how the door seals and cabin air system hold up to this.

Of course the rear of my truck was never fully sealed, despite my efforts, so I always ended up with a layer of dust over everything. I sure won't miss that. I imgine the door seals on the LC are top notch, but I wonder if there's anything that can be done to add a "subaru style" cabin air filtration system? Or any tips on keeping the interior as clean as possible on dirt roads, unless the seals and cabin air system is plenty good and i don't need to worry about it.
 
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#22
Congrats on your new Cruiser!

Don't be too down about the leather seats, though. I thought I'd hate them too, but after a few nasty spills (baby formula, barbecue sauce, dog vomit, motor oil, rain water, ad nauseum), I saw the advantage of leather. They wipe up clean and, believe it or not, are pretty comfortable. Throw some liquid vinyl or tape on those cracks, though, because they do have a tendency to spread.
 
#23
Nice ride.

Mine has leather and I put some ballistic nylon seat covers on them from SOR, due to cracks. Love them, easy to clean, custom fit and very stain resistant.

They make them for all rows of seats and they color match. Just an idea.

I have done a ton of things to my '93 over the past 18 months, some complicated some not.

Let me know if you want any ideas.


:beer:

Jeb
 

adventureduo

Dave Druck [KI6LBB]
#24
The PO put the spendy toyota dealer seat covers on mine and man they are tight. You can barely tell they're a cover. Come to think of it, i dont even remember pulling them off to check the leather condition underneath!
 

adventureduo

Dave Druck [KI6LBB]
#25
Brian894x4 said:
I have a question regarding dust. In the spring/summer months I drive MANY miles on dirt and dusty roads. Sometimes hundreds of a miles of dirt roads in a single trip. I'm curious how the door seals and cabin air system hold up to this.
Pretty well. I dont know if this answers your question.. but i was last in line on a Death Valley run where we ran dirt roads all 3 days. Well i had my windows up and the A/C on because i didnt want to deal with everyones dust being the caboose. Well everything was clean and we never ever felt dirty. Everyone else with their TJ's, YJ's, CJ's and M-715's were covered in dirt.

One of the advantages of having a nice wagon. All the women were wanting their husbands/bf's to get a cruiser after that trip lol
 
#26
That's great to hear about the dust and door seals, because I'm pretty tired of dust with our old truck.

Now that I've had some time to put some miles on it, including some muddy logging roads, here's my first impressions.

As first, it really seemed quite big, but after a few days, it doesn't feel big at all. In fact, it feels just right. Now, it is definately wide and I don't know how I'd feel about taking on a hairy narrow trail, but on wide open roads and logging and dirt roads it feels just fine. And despite my truck being smaller, the LC's superior handling makes it much easier to drive in almost everyway.

Power is more than adequate on the highway. In fact, being so used to a WAY underpowered rig, I find myself going much faster than I should and having to correct. (I'm not used to being able to go 70 mph ;) ) Not being passed up by loaded semi-trucks on step grades is definately nice, too. I do wonder how it's going to perform with 33s and the extra weight of a bumper, winch, sliders, etc.

This will be my first automatic rig in a long while, besides my wife's prior and current Subarus. When I was younger, I swore I'd never drive an auto. Now I couldn't happier with one. It just makes life so much easier on the highway and off road. I know a 5 speed would be neat to have to better utilize the power of the 1FZ, but I really do like not having to shift all the time. And a few minutes off road proved me that you can have so much more control with an auto. The low range in the LC, however, didn't feel all that low. I suspose that's largely because of a much higher first gear and final drive/tire ratio than I'm used too. But the motor is a low rpm torque monster and should compensate somewhat.

The engine compartment and engine itself is a work of art as far as I'm concerned. I know some don't like the engine layout, but after coming from my pick-up a super tight engine compartment, I love the openness and simplicity of the LC 1FZ. I've noticed a number of features that just scream expedition ready. Like, for example, the dirt trap under the air filter and the fail safe double fan/alternator belt system. Toyota really put some thought into the design of this rig. It's like they truly built it for the African desert, instead of just to "look" like it was made for that.

It definately drinks gas. I averaged 14 mpg on 1/2 a tank of mostly highway driving today. But I can't complain. I knew it wouldn't be great. I also know my truck got about 16 mpg and I had to run super, so in the end, the actual money I lay out for gas won't much more....except that I'll probably drive this one more, because it's so darn fun and easy to drive. Again, like the power issue, I do wonder how a bumper, winch, sliders and camping gear and especially 33s with 4.11s will affect the mileage. Am I going to end up with 10 mpg or :smilies27 single digits?

The room inside is wonderful. One of the best things I like about it. While my truck had a whole 6x5' bed to store stuff, the biggest problem was accessing it. The only easy storage I had was the last few feet of the bed at the rear. Anything stored forward of that was difficult to get too and the cab had literally no storage. With the LC, stuff stored behind the front seats is easily accessed by simply opening the rear doors and the rear storage behind the 2nd row seats is HUGE, yet still easy to access. The area from floor to roof is significantly bigger than my truck's bed to canopy roof, so that's a big plus in terms of storage. I also love how there's no hump in front and in between the 2nd row passenger seats making that a great area to store things. The 2nd row seats fold up ingeniusly and create a ton of room in back. Almost enough for the wife and I to sleep back there. At least in a pinch. Also, carrying at least 2 passengers, plus a ton of gear on a long trip in complete comfort should be no problem at all.

I had a chance to take it on a few muddy logging roads today and I noticed that for a solid axle truck, the suspension soaks up the bumps amazingly! It reminded me of my WCOR long A-arm IFS suspension I had on my truck several years back that just soaked up bumps like a Baja racer. I guess with the way my SAS truck drove, I expected the ride through potholes to be jarring and scary, but not even remotely close. I was really just floored at the size of potholes I could drive through and speed and the LC would barely react at all. I guess I'm "trained" to believe that solid axles are not suppose to perform this good. But not anymore.

The amount of stock articulation surprised me, considering it has sway bars front and rear. I guess that's the nature of solid axles. I can definately see why these things are lifted. I think more and more that a 2" OME lift will definately be in it's future to get things out of the weeds and to improve the break over angle a bit. Handling on the highway is awesome too. To me the suspension couldn't be a more perfect balance of off road articulation and great safe highway handling.

I weighed it today also. The total weight without me in it is about 5200lbs. That's with nearly a full tank and some gear in the back (maybe 150lbs worth). If I had my truck in that same configuration, it would weigh in at about 4900lbs, so the LC is definately heavier and that's without a winch, bumper and sliders. On a side note, I was checking out a co-worker's '01 LC100 and was shocked to see how much heavier it was at least GVW rated for. At least 400lbs more than my rig. I assume that means the curb weight is significantly more than mine as well? Anybody know what accounts for such a HUGE increase in weight between the 80 and 100, because I was all over his rig, and it really didn't seem any bigger than mine at all.

Anyway, that's my first impressions. Bottom line, I absolutely love driving it. It's everything I ever hoped for and fits our needs absolutely perfectly. If the gas mileage wasn't so bad, I'd dump the Subaru Forster and buy a 2nd one for the wife. I don't regret retiring the truck for this rig one single bit. I can't wait to put it to good use this spring/summer.

Next modifications will be a CDL switch, hand throttle, front mudflaps, duel battery set up along with a number of cig plugs. Parts are on thier way to me. Also, radios will be installed and somehow, someway, I'll figure out a way to mount a laptop. I don't really want to drill holes for my truck laptop mount, so I'll probably have to come up with something esle. Any ideas would be appreciated.

I haven't quite figured out the storage situation yet. The more I think about it, however, rear drawers really do make the most sense. I guess that's why everyone has them.
 
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DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
#27
Wow, lots of great info! I have a few questions/comments below.
I know some don't like the engine layout, but after coming from my pick-up a super tight engine compartment, I love the openness and simplicity of the LC 1FZ. I've noticed a number of features that just scream expedition ready. Like, for example, the dirt trap under the air filter and the fail safe double fan/alternator belt system. Toyota really put some thought into the design of this rig.
If there is one thing I'd like to change about my truck is to make it more obvious where a second battery should go. It's pretty obvious that a 2L-T powered truck would have the battery right where the air box is on the 22R-E. The other place that seems right is where the main fuse box and receiver/dryer for the A/C sit.

So the 80 engine bay is that much more uncluttered? That makes sense, the truck is wider and taller, but the engine isn't all that much longer or wider, so that means there's got to be more real estate under the hood.

I do like the doubled up belt on the important one, but I suspect you'll still be carrying spares. That's a characteristic of people here I'd bet. You could have 3 belts and you'd probably still have a new one in the parts box.
I also know my truck got about 16 mpg and I had to run super, so in the end, the actual money I lay out for gas won't much more.

Power is more than adequate on the highway. In fact, being so used to a WAY underpowered rig, I find myself going much faster than I should and having to correct. (I'm not used to being able to go 70 mph ;) ) Not being passed up by loaded semi-trucks on step grades is definately nice, too.
I have a very similar Hilux as yours was, other than mine is XtraCab and still running IFS. But 22R-E, W56, 5.29, etc. I do still only have 33" tires, which is likely the difference, but I pull 4th gear going up hill (and my average elevation is probably a bit higher), about 50MPH. The engine isn't a monster, but I think as long as its sitting in its power band it isn't given much credit. Mine is happy as can be at 2900 RPM, pulls decent, still gets good mileage. I've always had to run 91 octane, which I don't think is right. But my mileage has always varied around 20. With the 33/5.29 combo I get about 20 to 21.

I wonder if your engine was more tired than you thought?
I guess I'm "trained" to believe that solid axles are not suppose to perform this good. But not anymore.
That training is more of an indoctrination. IFS can never be good in rocks and solid axles are terrible for WOT. A well tuned suspension is a well tuned suspension. With a good spotter, my IFS is not my limiting factor. It's the knucklehead behind the wheel. Just the same, a live beam can be just fine on desert roads. What until you get OME on it!
Anybody know what accounts for such a HUGE increase in weight between the 80 and 100, because I was all over his rig, and it really didn't seem any bigger than mine at all.
The 2UZ engine is probably heavier, I'd expect. Neither the 1FZ nor the 2UZ are lightweight engines. They both have iron blocks, but the V8 is probably a heavy sucker. Frames, drivelines are basically the same. The 100 series might weigh more because of all the gadgets inside and if it had the third row of seats that's additional weight.
Anyway, that's my first impressions. Bottom line, I absolutely love driving it.
The key is that you're happy. I wonder if you'll miss your Hilux after a while. I know that the few years that I owned the FJ40 that I really missed having a pickup, so I went back. The Cruisers are nice, though! Congrats on the new truck.
 

locrwln

Expedition Leader
#28
Brian,

I know exactly how you feel, if my wife's car didn't get 32mpg, We would drive the 80 everywhere.

Get in touch with Alia176, he has the Moonstone Pearl with black LX450 rims and has a very sweet laptop mount. He whole rig is a great setup.

He has a photo album on Yahoo photos. Go to Yahoo Photos and search for Alia176 and you can check out a bunch of his build/ideas. I tried to link it, but I suck.

Jack
 
#29
Very, very nice writeup about a first impression.

That should be a sticky for curious buyers in the Toyota section as it tackles some misconceptions about size and ride quality.

However, with all of the crap I have put on my rig, I am still getting passed by semi trucks going up grades...:D I think my rig with gear and two full tanks is around 7K.

Now you are done for, you have discovered what I truly believe is the best vehicle I have ever driven or owned.

Let the mods begin!


:beer: :safari-rig:
 
#30
I second what Skillet said about grades, you get passed by everyone. I have thought about a turbo, but that's too $$$$.

Great write up and thoughts. Upgrading to the OME will be a huge noticeable difference. I fly down washboard roads @ 45 mph in comfort.


I need to get my 80 weighed as well. It would probably be scary to find out how much I actually weigh.
 
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