Black Powder - Pistols, Revolvers, Shotguns, Carbines, Rifles etc. - Traveling with firearms not needing to be registered and no paperwork

Well, lets talk about them. In USA, federally, black powder isn't considered an explosive/ firearms aren't regulated. I'll cite the actual code later unless someone wants beat me to it. However, state to state, and locality can have separate law concerning these.

For the most part, they are still great for traveling especially those that travel state to state and might forget about something they should have paperwork for. Leave it home and get proficient with BP.
 

dwh

Tail-End Charlie
When I was a teenager someone gave me one of those .50 cal. Hawken rifle kits (percussion cap). Man, I lavished the love on that build.

Shot the crap out of that thing for years. Took a couple whitetail with it. Finally got tired of cleaning it and handed it over to a buddy who was a Civil War reenactor and collected black powder guns.

Me likey cartridges mo' betta'.
 

Explorerinil

Observer
Here’s my Thomson pro hunter FX, being a fixed non interchangeable barrel it does not require an FFL to purchase. I love hunting and shooting blackpowder, but I would not rely on it for defense. CC963E89-C2B2-4071-A119-45A9C9D9AAF1.jpeg
 

Grump E-Vet

Active member
Well, lets talk about them. In USA, federally, black powder isn't considered an explosive/ firearms aren't regulated. I'll cite the actual code later unless someone wants beat me to it. However, state to state, and locality can have separate law concerning these.
Federally they were addressed under the National Firearms Act of 1934 (NFA) and further in the Gun Control Act (GCA0 of 1968. Basically, black powder guns are in the same class as antique firearms which are ones produced before 1899. This usually means that these do not require a C&R or even transfer thru an FFL to purchase. However a number of states have made their own regarding who may possess them and other restrictions. For example Iowa considers the same as a regular firearm when it comes to carry and requires the same permitting, so you really need to check state and local laws.

This is the citation from the BAFTE’s interpretation of Black Powder Laws federally from the GCA

“any muzzle loading rifle, shotgun, or pistol which is designed to use black powder or black powder substitute, and which cannot use fixed ammunition, is an “antique firearm” unless it (1) incorporates a firearm frame or receiver; (2) is a firearm which is converted into a muzzle loading weapon; or (3) is a muzzle loading weapon which can be readily converted to fire fixed ammunition by replacing the barrel, bolt, breechblock, or any combination thereof. See 18 U.S.C. § 921(a)(3), (a)(16). Thus, a muzzle loading weapon that meets the definition of an “antique firearm” is not a firearm and may lawfully be received and possessed by a prohibited person under the GCA.
In addition, the GCA defines the term “ammunition” to mean “ammunition or cartridge cases, primers, bullets, or propellant powder designed for use in any firearm.”
 

J!m

Active member
I have a C&R FFL and it gets pretty dicey with interwoven laws in one state, let alone 48 states.
 
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