Best *mid priced* Kinetic Recovery Rope?

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
If the time is limited due to a short rope then the then the peak force cannot be reached. Yes/Maybe :)?
Do you mean by not having as much distance to accelerate before starting to load the rope and putting less momentum into the system? I was thinking along the lines of a larger rope elongates less so the total time spent storing and releasing energy is reduced resulting in a higher peak force.
Oh, I agree. With all of the variables in play, any KRR is a compromise in some respects.
That's kind of the point, isn't it? Having a dynamic rope small enough to stretch is going to reduce the shock and give the yank that is the key. So you just want one not so oversized that it doesn't stretch at all or too small and close to breaking. The ideal size and length will depend like Phil mentioned. The one that works in one case might not be just right in another.
 

shade

Well-known member
That's kind of the point, isn't it? Having a dynamic rope small enough to stretch is going to reduce the shock and give the yank that is the key. So you just want one not so oversized that it doesn't stretch at all or too small and close to breaking. The ideal size and length will depend like Phil mentioned. The one that works in one case might not be just right in another.
Yep, that's why I said it. :)

If I made more use of one, I could definitely see adding another to my kit. They don't weigh much or take up much space, and they can save a lot of time.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
Do you mean by not having as much distance to accelerate before starting to load the rope and putting less momentum into the system? I was thinking along the lines of a larger rope elongates less so the total time spent storing and releasing energy is reduced resulting in a higher peak force.
From my experience the same stretch can be achieved with a larger/longer rope. Difference in stretch of a rope 90% MBS and another at 50% MBS might be 1' but adding 10' to a rope at 50% MBS would add 1 1/2' of stretch.
 

LosAngeles

Active member
Cool discussion. :)

I have reached out to ARB – as my rig (pickup truck plus truck camper ALWAYS on the back of truck) is about 10,000 lbs wet (loaded)

To ask them what ARB SNATCH STRAP is most suitable for recovery? the “medium” one ARB SNATCH STRAP – 24,000 LBS minimum breaking strength – PART NO ARB710LB

or the “strongest” one?

ARB SNATCH STRAP – 33,000 LBS minimum breaking strength – PART NO ARB715LB

but anyone here have any comments?

cheers :)
 
Get ready to break out your calculator. Use this information to calculate loads related to your vehicle. Hopefully if you encounter a vehicle larger than yours they have the proper sized recovery gear for their vehicle. Granted the info shown in the link is for static loads but can be used as a base for kinetic recovery ropes. While this thread touched lightly on vehicle speed it is very important. Excessive speed can overload a kinetic roper. Mass x Speed is the amount of energy applied to rope. NO BANZI charges. Also the material a vehicle stuck in and how deep is the resistance to moving. Is it flat ground or an incline play a role too. No pun intended.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
Get ready to break out your calculator. Use this information to calculate loads related to your vehicle. Hopefully if you encounter a vehicle larger than yours they have the proper sized recovery gear for their vehicle. Granted the info shown in the link is for static loads but can be used as a base for kinetic recovery ropes. While this thread touched lightly on vehicle speed it is very important. Excessive speed can overload a kinetic roper. Mass x Speed is the amount of energy applied to rope. NO BANZI charges. Also the material a vehicle stuck in and how deep is the resistance to moving. Is it flat ground or an incline play a role too. No pun intended.
These guidelines are indispensable for safety. This is especially true of polyester tow straps and chains.

Though, I'd reinforce your point that for purposes of calculating for safety such as this doesn't mean that's actually the amount that's going to be used and doesn't completely consider elongation as being intended. They don't seem to specify elongation but rather just matching strap width and WLL to use.

For example if you run the numbers for towing a disabled 4,000 lbs vehicle on flat pavement using the calculation of weight + additional rolling resistance + additional gradient resistance it would suggest 4,000 + 400 + 0 = 4,400 lbs and anyone who's had to push their car that's run out of gas knows it doesn't take 4,400 lbs to get it moving.

This is an example of calculating actual force you're using.

winching_p1.png

Therefore sizing a kinetic strap or rope is kind of balancing variables. First and foremost you need the rope to be safe, thus finding the working load and knowing breaking strength. Then knowing how much force you might actually use can then be used to determine how much stretch you expect.

Screen Shot 2020-02-07 at 11.29.03 AM.png

That's why sometimes a 1" seems to work just fine while another 3/4" seems not to stretch enough. Just a lot of variance to rolling resistance, grade and bogged factor. In the case of getting a stopped 4,000 lbs car moving on flat pavement the suggestion is it'll take 160 lbs, which seems about right and have essentially an undetectable amount of stretch on a dynamic rope.

So a realistic use might be to unstuck a Tacoma or Frontier on slightly inclined beach buried sidewall depth (using 5,500 lbs weight, rolling resistance of 5, gradient of 10°, bog factor of 1). That works out to 3,850 lbf to get unstuck and seems to align about at the top of the WLL limit for 3/4" rope on that Atlantic Braids chart.
 
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LandCruiserPhil

Expedition Leader
Just as if not more important than rope/strap selection are the drivers on each end of the rope. I have seen a straight forward easy recovery made into a difficult recovery due to a driver's lack of experience or guidance.
 

shade

Well-known member
Just as if not more important than rope/strap selection are the drivers on each end of the rope. I have seen a straight forward easy recovery made into a difficult recovery due to a driver's lack of experience or guidance.
Mom put her van in Park and set the parking brake because a road grader was pulling her out of the mud too fast.
The grader operator introduced me to some new words that day.
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
Just as if not more important than rope/strap selection are the drivers on each end of the rope. I have seen a straight forward easy recovery made into a difficult recovery due to a driver's lack of experience or guidance.
Very true, YouTube's full of such.
You don't even have to pull as hard as that TOyota vid above, particularly if the other vehicle is operable and not just dead weight. Both vehicle drivers have to have a modicum of a clue and work cooperatively. There's a place for brute / maximum force but it doesn't need to be the default setting. Lot of folks don't understand physics or momentum. And that's when ropes/cables/chains get parted and people get hurt.
 

Box Rocket

Well-known member
I got one of these a few weeks ago. Quality and reviews look good. Haven't used mine yet but I expect it will work well.
 

geojag

Member
I have the 7/8 ASR ultimate recovery rope, it was perfect for my 4Runner, and now resides in my Tacoma. I think with the ASR ropes, the recommended 7/8 rope will serve you best for a Xterra.
 

Robert Bills

Explorer
I don't pretend to know the "best" mid-priced kinetic rope, but I offer for your consideration the product line from Tactical Recovery Equipment [TRE] in Nevada.

https://tacticalrecoveryequipment.com/

I currently own TRE synthetic winch line with their Safety Thimble II (designed by Blaine Johnson, formerly licensed to Viking Offroad), soft shackles, tree strap, kinetic rope, etc. All are high quality products. Prices were fair; customer service has been excellent.
 
I've seen some manufacturing and testing stuff on kinetics that will scare the sh!t out of you and I've seen a kinetic failure in my Mil Days which was violent.

TRE makes good kit and I carry a Bubba but only because I bought the Bubba before I properly researched TRE; either of these sources are legit and will follow through and stand by their stuff with proper and scientific testing which for me in a dynamic recovery is an absolute confidence builder and necessity.

I've used TRE on numerous occasions in the Imperial Dunes and top notch equip.

My next rope will be a TRE as cost/pull makes sense with a reputable company like TRE.

IMO Only!
 
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