Best Coating to Prevent Rust on Tools Attached to Outside of the Vehicle

XJSuperman

OhIOWAn
Disclaimer: Paint will chip, wears, fades, rusts, etc. Not a solution.

Oils run, get weathered off, and eventually need recoating. Not a solution. Fluid Film (awesome stuff) included. I HATE oil marks down the side of my vehicle.

Plastidip isn't a bad idea, but isn't a wipe and go process either. Maybe not the best option.

I have a shovel and a hi-lift on my roof rack that are outside, all year, every day, in the rain, sun, and snow, and they are both faded and rusty. I gave up on the hi-lift until I redo the rack itself, but the shovel I have repainted a couple times, and the red spray paint I used always fades to Breast-Cancer-Awareness-Pink (nothing against that, it just isn't what Im after).

So Im going to try another type of paint this week, and I think instead of the "implement red" Im going to try a self etching primer and enamel paint combo. Might be worthless, but Ill let you know in a few months if/when it fails. I used a couple good coats of polyurethane on the wood handles. BUT I really wanted a thicker lacquer to put on them. Im thinking that will work better.

Yes, I know I said paint is not a solution, but my final solution is that it doesn't bother me that my shovel isn't spotless, I am only bothered by the rust stains, and oil marks on my vehicle. So I repaint the shovel each year. Works for me I guess.
 

M35A2

Tinkerer
Shovels and axes are primitive implements. There is no need to overthink it or for unicorn nectar used on jet planes.

Used crankcase oil and a rag. Occasionally wipe them down, handles and all. (Linseed oil is better for wood, I'll give you that.)

Not for anything, but if you are worried about oil drips on your paint, why do you have an externally mounted shovel or axe in the first place? For looks or utility?

No offense meant.
 

XJSuperman

OhIOWAn
Shovels and axes are primitive implements. There is no need to overthink it or for unicorn nectar used on jet planes.

Used crankcase oil and a rag. Occasionally wipe them down, handles and all. (Linseed oil is better for wood, I'll give you that.)

Not for anything, but if you are worried about oil drips on your paint, why do you have an externally mounted shovel or axe in the first place? For looks or utility?

No offense meant.
None taken. I believe theres nothing wrong with having a decent looking rig that is ready to roll into whatever comes up. The rust and oil marks on my already aging paint are not something I enjoy looking at. Just like a truck on the road with orange/brown rust stains down the walls where the hinges are. Function over fashion yeah, but there's no reason it can't be functional and nice shape as well. Keeping tools painted nice until they are needed is the route I take. I have no problems taking the paint off during use, but afterwards when Im on the road I keep em nice.
 

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chromisdesigns

Adventurer
I used to use boiled linseed oil, by the way, those people recommending linseed oil are hopefully referring to boiled cause straight linseed oil is hard to find and isn't what you want. Now I wipe the wood and the shovel blade down with full strength Ballistol once or twice per year. It's cheap, easy and works fine in the low humidity southwest. Developed for protecting wooden stocks and rifle barrels, non-toxic, available thru Amazon and other on-line vendors as well as brick and mortar sources, mostly gunshops. Get the non-aerosol type, much cheaper. My roof top mounted shovel was made in 1943 in Eastern Europe and it's still in good shape after living on my Land Cruiser the past 4-5 years. Used fairly regularly.
Ballistol is good too
 
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