Are any of the newer LR's capable?

#1
Curious - are any of the newer Land Rovers ( e.g. the Discovery of the Range Rover Sport ) capable at some overlanding? I know they're more designed with more road manners than off road in mind, but they still seem pretty capable.

Heck, Matt Farah took a Velar off-roading at the Pioneer Trail, so I'm mildly curious ( WARNING: the One Take is about an hour long, and it's not edited, there is some language )


.... plus I'm in love with the Namib Orange on the Discoverys
 
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merr1ca

New member
#2
Yes, the bigger stuff is actually more capable than its predecessors. Better angles, better traction control systems. Now, are they as "rugged" no, not really, but they are wayyyyy more reliable. What this new stuff can do on street tires blows my mind.
 
#4
What do you need to overland in North America? Reliability, fuel economy, cargo space, mild off-road capability, and durability. They have all that, except the latter. Lots of low hanging plastics, and LT tires are very difficult to fit.
 
#5
What do you need to overland in North America? Reliability, fuel economy, cargo space, mild off-road capability, and durability. They have all that, except the latter. Lots of low hanging plastics, and LT tires are very difficult to fit.
They apparently have better departure angles or near the same as the previous ones have had. Now in regards to the aftermarket, that's a bit different
 
#6
The ones that have the 2 speed transfer box are capable. The others less so but not horrible.
I think the Discovery is the only one that has that. I don't think the Range Rover has one ( although now they have some awesome downhill descent control systems, and crawl systems )
 
#9
The Range Rover (not the extended wheelbase) is still the king of the crop when it comes to breakover, fording depth, approach, departure, etc. Next to the Jeep Wrangler it's actually the best. It's much better than even the TRD Pro 4Runner.

The biggest downside to the modern rover is:

1) Tires. With 20" rims you are lucky to get off-road traction, let alone actual sidewall strength that a D or E-rated tire offers. If you could fit 18's on the newer rovers, things open up.

2) Body design. The engineering is solid, the body sucks. Adding winches and armor is next to impossible. I know with the LR3 and 4 stuff is available, but hopefully you can get it for the D5? With my L322 you can't get sliders to save your life. Without sliders and armor your are essentially stuck with an expensive rig that is the "best in class" for 4/10 rated trails and that's it. Maybe some "soft" 5s if you are a good driver. Modability is nil. It's dumb. This is where the 4-runner will blow you away. Put on an OME 3.5" lift, put 33" tires on it and toss on ARB-lockers and you've just out-classed the Range Rover.

There is so much potential in the modern platforms (cross-linked air, etc), even the reduced weight of the new rovers vs. the previous generation rovers is incredible. But it is all wrapped up in a bubbly body design. The SVX team even had to mount the winch on the REAR of the Disco 5 because they couldn't mod it to be on the front. Really? For $100k+ and you can't mount a winch up front?

Oh, and speaking of the discovery 5, the radiators are in front of the WHEELS!! Even if you could get an aftermarket bumper, it'd expose the radiators to damage. Talk about dumb. That's the price to pay for the bubble "Ford Explorer" facisa (that is designed for FWD cars by the way), is there isn't any room for a radiator in the traditional spot, so they put it in front of the tires! That's just trail damage waiting to happen. So I really love the D5, but I can't recommend it. The first photo of one on safari in Africa (Overland Journal) showed the plastic underside all tore up.

So really, your best bet is an LR3 or 4 if you want to enjoy a modern rover on the trail.
 
#10
I'm an owner of a 2017 Discovery HSE Td6 and I absolutely love it. My other 4x4 is a 2011 FJ Cruiser (which I'm sadly in the process of selling) and the main reason for switching over to the Discovery 5 was for my growing family (have a toddler & infant at the moment). The reality for me these days is that I spend more time crawling parking lots, shuttling kids around to various activities then on backcountry roads so in a sense, the Discovery 5's versatility is perfect for us. On the rare occasion where we are able to pack up and hit up the backcountry, the Discovery makes it a really comfortable experience.

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Having worked in the automotive aftermarket industry in the past, I know the aftermarket support will eventually come. The price point of the Discovery 5 and the fact that most of these new buyers will unlikely touch a dirt road, sort of leaves a chicken and egg problem when it comes to aftermarket support. There's less money in the D5 market at this time but I have faith that more support will come in time.

In terms of capability, the new Discovery is very capable. Just check out this shot us on stock 21" Eagle F1 street tires hauling up my full loaded AT Overland Chaser up a steep hill. I am equipped from center and rear locking differentials, so it definitely helps in combination of the Terrain Response 2 system. All doing this while I had my infant comfortably napping in the rear seat. I don't think I would have experienced such a smooth climb in my FJ Cruiser.

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Another thing I love, I'm getting about 20-21 mpg on the diesel vs the 15-16 mpg in the FJ Cruiser when pulling my trailer.
 
#11
I've driven the new disco 5 on the LR Biltmore course. I was fairly impressed. But that said it was a controlled course and they wouldn't put the vehicle on something it wouldn't do.

I could see the new "crawl control" being a benefit. But really 2 speed transfer case with a rear locker would be a stout combo.
 
#12
I work at a dealer so I've gotten to drive every model and I have to say the biggest disappointment in design is the low hanging plastic and body panels. My d1 and even the lr3 are so much more protected just by having the body higher up. Besides that though, the disco 5, disco sport and the full size range rover and the sport are all pretty nice in regards to disability and seating position. all they are pretty easy to see over the hood to negotiate terrain and the high vantage point is reminiscent of earlier models. The velar and evoque are simply road cars.
 
#14
I did the LR Experience in rural England and witnessed every new model doing some pretty gnarly stuff - all on basic street tires. I was in a 2015 Defender (because I'm a Defender owner and wanted to check it out since we can't drive those over here) and saw everything from the Disco to the RR tackle a lot of the same terrain. My mom has a 2017 RR with the diesel engine and I have no doubt it's extremely capable...
 
#15
Oh, and speaking of the discovery 5, the radiators are in front of the WHEELS!! Even if you could get an aftermarket bumper, it'd expose the radiators to damage. Talk about dumb. That's the price to pay for the bubble "Ford Explorer" facisa (that is designed for FWD cars by the way), is there isn't any room for a radiator in the traditional spot, so they put it in front of the tires! That's just trail damage waiting to happen. So I really love the D5, but I can't recommend it. The first photo of one on safari in Africa (Overland Journal) showed the plastic underside all tore up.

So really, your best bet is an LR3 or 4 if you want to enjoy a modern rover on the trail.
Yep, that stupid radiator... So frustrating. There is only only one steel bumper so far and it looks like when you tried on your mum's bra as a kid.
 
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