Antenna mounting center of hood?

downhill

Adventurer
So I'm looking at installing a CB on a truck with a fiberglass cabover. I've read everything I can find about antenna placement, and basically the answer is: there is no good place. From a purely functional standpoint, the only ground plane available is the hood of the truck. Second best might be center of the front bumper, but my signal would be significantly biased to the rear of the vehicle. All the bumper/fender/mirror options come with similar distortions to the signal field. So the question is, why do you never see antennae mounted in the hood? Is there a real reason, or is it just so epically uncool that no one will do it? Would the electrical activity of the engine have an effect? I'm pretty uncool already, so it's a small leap for me if it works! I expect that a good ground strap to the hood would be in order. Comments?
 
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DaveInDenver

Luddite
CB in the U.S. is situated on frequencies that on a vehicle mean compromised efficiency no matter where you put an antenna, so don't get too wrapped around the axle worrying about it. Most locations, even the middle of the roof, aren't ideal for CB.

This is not true of VHF and UHF radios, so 2m and 70cm ham, GMRS, MURS, etc. Location of the antenna has a significant impact on how well those work.

Nothing wrong with the middle of the hood from a ground plane possibility but there a couple of issues.

First is it's obviously right in your view and might be in the way when you check the oil. One of the things I mention is the ideal antenna mount is a non-starter if it's a PITA daily and antennas (BTW it's antennas for RF radiating elements not antennae, which is biological term for more than one antenna on insects) middle of the hood or bull bars can irritate people when they have to look at them all the time.

The second is most of us here in the U.S. have gasoline engines and the main sources of radio interference are ignition systems and alternators. The alternator isn't usually a problem for badly radiated energy, it's usually coupled on the power direction from wiring. However spark plugs, wires and distributors are a major source and putting your antenna and coax feed line right next to that isn't ideal.
 

mep1811

Gentleman Adventurer
Since it it is a CB antenna so get to wrapped up on the mounting location. Save the roof for a GMRS or Ham antenna.
 
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