Another valve seal question -smog due

bikerjosh

Explorer
Yep, I know there are a lot of threads on replacing the seals but I'm under a time crunch. I've known that the time would come that I'd need to do this, but I just failed the visual inspection part of smog since the montero had smoke come out of the tail pipe after the tech rev'd it then let drop to idle.
Since my smog is due within a week and I won't get the time to swap the seals for a few weeks, is there anything I can do to temporarily cut down on the smoke to pass the smog test? Such as thicker oil, some magic oil additive to plump the valve seals or chemical (like adding Denatured Alcohol to gas to make an under performing CAT look better)?
I have to take it to a "STAR" smog station, so they tend to look it over pretty closely.

Thanks for any insight- Josh:(
 

DirtyDC05

Adventurer
Try removing your a/c belt and turn the a/c on it believe it helps . I could be wrong but I think it affects the amount of oil passing the valves.
 

jeep-N-montero

Expedition Leader
Not to sound like captain obvious, but if you knew it was an issue for some time why not just fix it before smog was due? I live in one of the few counties in the nation that follow the same guidelines as CARB and am all too familiar with some of their headaches.
 

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jeep-N-montero

Expedition Leader
Try removing your a/c belt and turn the a/c on it believe it helps . I could be wrong but I think it affects the amount of oil passing the valves.
I believe they usually test with accessories turned off, not to mention they would likely flag it if a belt is missing.
 

DirtyDC05

Adventurer
Belts don't matter for smog also can remove the accesory knobs. They won't notice that the a/c is in the on position. Not sure if this will help pass smog but I remember mine smoked less when I had the issue.
 

bikerjosh

Explorer
Not to sound like captain obvious, but if you knew it was an issue for some time why not just fix it before smog was due? I live in one of the few counties in the nation that follow the same guidelines as CARB and am all too familiar with some of their headaches.
Previous owner said it might need to be done. Passed the smog check 1.5 years ago when I bought it. Haven't noticed any smoke and after 1500 miles since the last oil change the level is pretty much the same. Wasn't smoking at all until the tech hit the throttle to 4000, held it for about 10 seconds and then dropped it to idle.
 

BOPOH

Explorer
i'm not sure how much it can help you, but you know most cars have oil in their intake pipes. try cleaning it and throttle body too anything that can introduce oil into your combustion chambers
 

bikerjosh

Explorer
Thanks for the advice BOPOH, I'll look into it.

For those of you that have changed your valve seals, does anyone know of a thread that lists all the other parts I need to have before starting this? So far I just have the seals and valve lash adjusters(was told to replace those while I'm there, but could use an idea of other items i.e. plenum gasket, throttle body gasket (in case it rips) etc.
thanks
 

DirtyDC05

Adventurer
Lower plenum gasket, valve cover gaskets. That's about it. Unless you need plugs and boot gaskets. No need to remove the throttle body from the plenum.
 

BOPOH

Explorer
it's a good idea to replace rear cam o-rings, vacuum hoses, coolant hoses to throttle body + hoses to heater core; all these are extras but once you take the intake manifold you'll have so much room so these parts will take only minutes to replace. There are total (suggested to replace) : valve cover gaskets x2, spark plug well gaskets x6, egr gasket x1, pcv valve x1, lower plenum gasket x1.
 

nckwltn

Explorer
buy some extra keepers too.... one of those 10 cent parts can sink the whole job.


I was able to do the whole thing keeping the heads and all of the cooling passages on using the lever style valve compressor..... You've seen my video on the rope, compressed air really helps shoot the rope down into the cylinder head. Also, block off return oil passages with rags/paper towels, the same for the other spark plug tubes from cylinders that you aren't using.... I ended up using a spark plug adapter connected to my air compressor to rotate the engine to get each piston into bottom dead center before threading the rope into the cylinder.
 

BOPOH

Explorer
what he said. take out spark plugs so it's easy to turn the engine and put aerosol can caps on it. With those you can turn engine and not worry about sucking anything it or blowing out


 

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twocommas

Observer
Hey guys, I could really use some help putting a parts list together for this project. I found a good shop that will do the project and I am hoping to source parts from oemmitsubishiparts.com/ in order to get quality parts for cheap.

Since there is so much labor involved in replacing the valve stem seals, I am hoping to do a bigger refresh at this time.
 

emmagator

New member
I ended up using a spark plug adapter connected to my air compressor to rotate the engine to get each piston into bottom dead center before threading the rope into the cylinder.
You can rotate the engine compressed air? No need to access timing belt and crankshaft? Am i understanding correctly? Im going to take on the valve stem seals project soon on my 2002 Montero.
 
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