Another Anti-Adventure Road Trip

unkamonkey

Explorer
I had 6 straps holding my bike on. It couldn't have gone anywhere regardless of what position I was in. My rack is about 19" off the ground on my Mitso Fuso.
Talk to your local Harley dealer. They ship bikes with some nice ratchet straps to hold the bikes in their container. They are supposed to give them to you when you buy the bike but you have to ask for them.
I did do a lot of work at the local Harley place, I was over 300 lbs and had the beard and long hair, typical for somebody from a biker movie.
I still have the beard and long hair but I've also lost over 100 lbs and I look like a skeleton. I did enjoy riding my dirt bikes more than the Harley
 
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Hondarider

Adventurer
Ahhh! That's even better information! The next time, I will measure the unloaded/unpressurized ride height, pump the bags up to 30lbs (Firestone bags rated 5-35), load the bike, and then lower the pressure until I reach the unloaded height again. That sounds like it should work perfectly. Thanks!

Glad to be that faceless resource :26_7_2:

Just so you know I'm not making it up though, here is the info from a manufacturer:

Q: Do you add air to Airlift 1000 before adding the load, i.e. how do I level my vehicle?

A: Add air to maximum pressure, add the load,*then*release air until the vehicle is level.

from http://www.airsprings.cc/4x4/Airlift/FAQ/FAQAirlift.htm

*OPERATING TIPS:
1. Inflate you air springs to 25 psi before adding the payload. This will allow the air cylinder to properly mesh with the
coil spring. After vehicle is loaded, adjust your air pressure (down) to level the vehicle and for ride comfort.

From *Polyair*Red Series.

[PDF]POLYAIR INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS - airsprings.cc

www.airsprings.cc/4x4/Airlift/AL1000/MN087.pdf

I've had polyair springs in a few rigs now and their method is spot on :victory:
 

Hondarider

Adventurer
More trip supplies arriving daily...

IMG_0889.jpg

I'm not really in charge of the routes on this trip, but I'm not big on following blindly...I like to at least know where I am in case I become seperated from the group or something terrible happens and I need to find help as quickly as possible. Things might have tunred out differently for the Donner Party if they had some accurate, waterproof maps. Mostly though...I just like looking at maps. Contour lines make me happy.
 

Hondarider

Adventurer
Mr. LaDue and I have been engaged in daily communication over all sorts of important trip planning details. In some cases, heated exchange ensues over critical decisions that must be made...

Today's debate centers on a topic that has been argued passionately by men of action throughout the world...in centers of great power...in institutions of higher learning...in traditional Russian bath houses...in the darkest corners of the third world...in dusty saloons...in noisy middle school cafeterias...

BACKPACK vs. FANNY PACK

Now Mr. LaDue opines that a backpack is simply too burdensome and likely to cause the user to sweat profusely. I assured him that, after spending a significant amount of time humping ALICE in my life, my Kriega R15 is like wearing nearly nothing at all and the x-strap design will ensure full range of motion; even while wearing a jacket. Mr. LaDue would have you believe that real men rock the fanny pack...like Batman. I argue that Batman wore tights and a bondage mask, hung out with a twink named Robin, and couldn't manage to defeat Burgess Meredith. Our exact exhange went something like this...

LaDue: "Just remember Mr. Adventure, you're already wearing a shirt and a jacket of some sort. Add a backpack to that ensemble and you might find yourself getting hot and bothered under there (not in a good way). You are, of course, welcome to join a little known sect of two-wheeled enthusiasts known as marsupial motorcyclists...rocking those fanny packs that you find so aesthetically displeasing...frolicking about...unencumbered by bulky gear or inhibition...no longer bound by the rules of polite society...like the raucous descendants of Dionysus"

Me: "I really can't see a fanny pack in my future. Not that there's anything wrong with that...that's a lifestyle choice that you have to make for yourself...and I can respect it...that is, if you subscribe to the belief that it is, in fact, truly a choice...some will argue that you're either born a fanny pack guy or you're not...it's not a choice that you can consciously make...I have, however, heard of men making the transition to fanny packs in their 50s or even 60s after raising families and carrying a backpack on more than one occassion...living a completely closeted exisitence...having always "identified" as a fanny pack guy despite putting on the charade...some even finding fame and great success as backpack guys. To bravely transition to a fanny pack at that late stage...despite the pain and awkwardness you're family might endure...makes you a hero in my book...a fanny pack wearing hero."

Mr. LaDue counters that the position of the fanny pack makes all of the difference in the world, somehow rationalizing that as long as it is positioned to the rear of the wearer, it is both masculine and functional.

I decided to take the high rode and accept his feeble rationalization...knowing in my heart that it would give me a week's worth of comic fodder once we're in Colorado.

These exchanges go on almost daily at this point and I've never even met the guy. There is some potential for this trip to profoundly stupid in the most entertaining of ways.
 
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Hondarider

Adventurer
WHile I'm on the topic of backpacks, I noticed today while I was putting in my new maps, that mine is getting quite bulky. I'm starting to question the value of carrying spare tire tubes (front and rear) on daily expeditions. I'm thinking that I might leave the tire tubes at the hotel for significant repair activity and just bring a patch kit on the trail each day. Riding in New England, one can almost always reach civilization on even the flattest of tires so I don't usually mess with trail repairs. I just limp it to the nearest house on a flat or stash it in the woods and walk back to my truck or house. I don't think that is a solid approach for the wide expanses that Colorado has to offer, but I don't want to go overboard either. Any thoughts from the seasoned veterans?
 

pricey

Observer
WHile I'm on the topic of backpacks, I noticed today while I was putting in my new maps, that mine is getting quite bulky. I'm starting to question the value of carrying spare tire tubes (front and rear) on daily expeditions. I'm thinking that I might leave the tire tubes at the hotel for significant repair activity and just bring a patch kit on the trail each day. Riding in New England, one can almost always reach civilization on even the flattest of tires so I don't usually mess with trail repairs. I just limp it to the nearest house on a flat or stash it in the woods and walk back to my truck or house. I don't think that is a solid approach for the wide expanses that Colorado has to offer, but I don't want to go overboard either. Any thoughts from the seasoned veterans?
Carry one 21 inch tube and tyre irons in a fender bag. You can use a 21 inch tube in a pinch (no pun intended) in an 18 or 17 inch rear but you can't go the other way. 'Tis what I do on my humble (yet better than an xr) dr650. Gets the weight off your back to boot.

I too wear a backpack (because fanny packs, known as bum bags here as a fanny means something else entirely in Australia, are not masculine at all) but mine is virtually just a 3 litre camelpack with a little room for snacks. Tools are carried in my oversize tool tube and sometimes I use a tank bag to store lunch etc if I'm on a longer ride.

Regards,

The faceless one :bike_rider:
 
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Hondarider

Adventurer
After rereading portions of my last story (over on that other forum), it occurrs to me that, for me, the most entertaining aspects of the story involved detailed accounts of my many neuroses and my nonstop verbal battery of my traveling companion. I had been reluctant to go in that direction on this report as I don't actually know my travelling companions and they may not embrace the role of comic foil. However, this report is starting to read like a dull technical manual of trip preparation and there's not a whole lot of actual entertainment. I queried my new friend, LaDue, on the topic and he claims that he has no desire to stifle my creative juices when it comes to this tale of high drama at high altitudes. After all, he read that other report before inviting me along. He should know what to expect.

So along those lines, I thought I might share some of our stimulating conversations as we count down the days to what I'm sure will be a historic event in Gunnison, CO.

A couple days ago, Mr. LaDue tells me in an email that he will no longer be taking part in that grand social experiment known as Facebook. I assume this decision is in response to a comment war between him and an 8th grade girl who called him out on his affinity for the fanny pack. Mr. LaDue indicates that this was a joint decision involving both he and his wife. I'll just assume that she agrees with the 8th grader and is mortified by the fanny pack; wanting to hide her identity before the Today Show picks up on this story.

Stunned by the news that I would no longer be greeted with supportive and life affirming messages like "M.LaDue likes your picture of Breakfast at the Diner" or "M.LaDue commented "True Dat" on your status update", I responded with an appropriate amount of outrage.

"Let me get this straight!! Are you saying that youre wife and you prefer your interactions with other people using such barbaric tools as vocal chords, inflection of tone, and dare I suggest...hand gestures?!?!?! I'm not even sure what that type of converstaion is called anymore..."virtual Facebook" I suppose. Don't you want to evolve beyond such laborious communication? Don't you want even your smallest accomplishments to be celebrated by your adoring FB "friends"? I suppose you guys still participate in other arcane practices...physical displays of affection...kissing...hand holding...eye contact!...yikes! I think I'm going to be sick! I'm not sure what to think of you Iowegans and your strange middle-America ways. What a crazy cast of characters you have out there...it's like Burning Man up in there...you bunch of hippies. I'm not even sure that this Colorado thing can even happen now. You're probably going to want to kick back at the end of a long day of riding...together...sitting around a table...or even worse..a fire...drinking a few beers...eating some good food...swapping tales of heroic deeds and near death incidents...exaggerating tales of damsels loved and lost until well past sunset. I've got to tell you...I'm simply not down with that. I'd prefer to retire to our individual rooms...use my iPad to order some fresh cale to be delivered to my room from the nearest WHole Foods...and then make FaceBook posts about the day's ride...following up with pithy comments from the relative safety and comfort of our keyboards. That's how I like to have a good time and interact with friends...that's real living...virtually"

I did go on to admit that social media is a great poison...diminishing the human experience...breeding isolation within the fantastical promise of broader social interaction...contributing to the utter demise of communication skills...the death knell of the hearty handshake and eye contact...

but I sure like the constant barrage of cool cars and boobies.
 

Hondarider

Adventurer
Carry one 21 inch tube and tyre irons in a fender bag. You can use a 21 inch tube in a pinch (no pun intended) in a 18 or 17 inch rear but you can't go the other way. 'Tis what I do on my humble (yet better than an xr) dr650. Gets the weight off your back to boot.

I too wear a backpack (because fanny packs, known as bum bags here as a fanny means something else entirely in Australia, are not masculine at all) but mine is virtually just a 3 litre camelpack with a little room for snacks. Tools are carried in my oversize tool tube and sometimes I use a tank bag to store lunch etc if I'm on a longer ride.

Regards,

The faceless one :bike_rider:
Fanny packs are not masculine in Australia?!!??! Clearly things are much different on the opposite side of the earth.



If I could accomplish one thing in life, I would like to develop and distribute a "sarcasm font". I would call it Bentz Type.
 

ibanezer

Adventurer
I did go on to admit that social media is a great poison...diminishing the human experience...breeding isolation within the fantastical promise of broader social interaction...contributing to the utter demise of communication skills...the death knell of the hearty handshake and eye contact...

but I sure like the constant barrage of cool cars and boobies.
:clapsmile Nailed it.
 

Marc LaDue

New member
Nice Write-up so far!

I've joined another on-line cult just to enable my daily fix of "Hero to the Stupid"; I only hope this won't crash and burn as tragically at my ventures with Facebook and LinkedIn did. Having a ball getting six (6!) pages down!

LaDue

P.S. You're okay to drop the Mr.; all signs indicate we'll be sharing blood via transfusion in under two weeks, so we might as well do away with unnecessary formalities.
 

Hondarider

Adventurer
I like the "Mr."

It sets up the pretense of a mature, responsible adult...a professional educator...a pillar of society...a leader of men...a proud son of Iowa.

That will make it way funnier when things go horribly awry and you are revealed as a depraved maniac later in the story. I'm building something here. It's character development.
 

r3mac

New member
The mechanical items look to be well sorted. Bravo, and not one mention of a visit to an ER or even the medicine cabinet.

It is getting close to the time to start discussions with you father around items like piss-bottles, and properly identifying and storage. Music and Radio etiquette is another topic that can cause epic bouts of gas seem like a pleasant alternative.
 

unkamonkey

Explorer
I'm enjoying this thread.
On my Yamaha I had my fanny pack strapped around my handlebars. Handy for the possible essentials you might need on the road. Be aware, things in there will get wet in the rain. Needed tools and parts were in the stock tool kit mounted to the rear fender. On the Harley, I have a leather tool kit mounted in front of the motor. Same advice about things getting wet in there while out in the rain. Spare spark plugs, rain suit, gloves, siphon hose, extra helmet etc. are in the saddle bags. I also have two packs that attach to the backrest. a large and a small. There is a heavy vinyl liner that attaches to either via Velcro. About the size for 12 adult beverages and ice, Not that I would do that while riding, as they told me years ago, everybody out there on the road is trying to kill you if you are on a bike.
 

unkamonkey

Explorer
A friend is a former Sheriffs deputy. He did a few illegal things on his bikes to avoid being run over. As said, keep your eyes on everything around you. A friend was a State Patrol Officer and had to take the bike class. He hated the Harleys they had to ride. He loved being in an airplane doing the "bear in the air". Both of my former Yamahas have been on the ground. Just had to sit and laugh at what I had done, not much else you can do at that time. The Harley has never been tipped but I've scraped the exhaust a few times going up a canyon.
 

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