An Axe - Seriously?

In the back of my camper I carry a pulaski, 2 shovels, a bow saw and machete. Among many other things. Usually a manual tree limb remover as well.
 

old .45

Observer
Some of you folks are just begging for your stuff to be stolen.... axe head made of leather? Not good in the rain, kydex much better, oh then there is rust....Cheers!
 

Recommended books for Overlanding

Don't Go There. It's Not Safe. You'll Die.: And other mor...
by Jared McCaffree, Jessica Mans, Kobus Mans
From $19.99
Lone Rider
by speth Beard
From $27.64

Mickey Bitsko

Adventurer
looking at this thread and wondering how could there be 693 opinions on why/what is an axe/hatchet for?
my only question after all the comments nobody asked the op if he ever figured out what an
axe/hatche is used for, seems obvious to me, but maybe the op hasn't been around much.

so after not a heck of a lot of thought i will try my hand at what axes/hatchet are used for just in case nobody is
clear on it uses. 1 , you can chop wood or clear a shooting lane [this may need some explaining at a later time]
2, when backpacking, it's customary not to carry a chainsaw [ again, if this needs to be explained maybe someone
can chime in]
3, there are times , when in desolation wilderness areas you're not allowed to use ant type of mechanical devices,
that would include a chainsaw, so the primitive axe/hatchet would prove beneficial.
i'm sure many members in last 693 comments have brought up many other uses ie; defending yourself from the occasional
zombie when you can't get your chainsaw started.
to the op, i hope putting these why's and whatfors and the other 693 comment have helped you to understand the basic uses
of the axe/hatchet.
one last comment , if the op has never seen an axe/hatchet being used or operated, i'm sure there are several youtube vids
that will show the uses , maintenance and care of the axe/hatchet.

good luck
 

billiebob

Well-known member
Axe, on a daily basis, one use, splitting firewood.

I had one on every camping trip for 50 years. Today, I quit the bonfire, campfire, fireside chat 5 years ago when BC was ravaged by forest fires and the campfire bans came out in earnest. Suddenly for me, the campfire was comparable to smoking. The hazards were so high why bother. So now I carry a shovel and amazingly I use it more than an axe. Mostly to put out fires left "burning" by idiot "campers/overlanders".

I'll add pictures of the idiot campfires I come across everyday. BC has a campfire standard which gets violated every day.

Heres the BC Standard...

 

Bravo30

Active member
Axe, on a daily basis, one use, splitting firewood.

I had one on every camping trip for 50 years. Today, I quit the bonfire, campfire, fireside chat 5 years ago when BC was ravaged by forest fires and the campfire bans came out in earnest. Suddenly for me, the campfire was comparable to smoking. The hazards were so high why bother. So now I carry a shovel and amazingly I use it more than an axe. Mostly to put out fires left "burning" by idiot "campers/overlanders".

I'll add pictures of the idiot campfires I come across everyday. BC has a campfire standard which gets violated every day.

Heres the BC Standard...


Thankfully, we don’t have that problem here in Pa. I don’t think I could go in the woods without a nice fire.

7A9FDAB7-A1FC-4B76-8600-72D76DA17104.jpeg
 

nitro_rat

On a Suburban Excursion
I read a few pages at the beginning and at the end and it looks like the community has lost the "tribal knowledge" of why axe/shovel mounts exist in the first place...

It's a requirement for traveling USFS property and roads to have an axe, shovel, and bucket on your vehicle...
 

krick3tt

Adventurer
I have used/carried an ax for decades but found a bow saw (for firewood, dead branches only please) to be more useful and easier of store out of the weather. As I get older (74 now) my aim is not as accurate as it used to be and I am a bit wary of the danger I pose to myself. A saw is more my style now. Also there are so many places that I go that have fire bans in place that I have begun to carry and use a propane campfire, the Rangers really love me now. All of the ambiance and none of the danger.
As far as clearing a path in the wilderness, I am inclined to not go that deep into the wild anymore.

edit: https://www.amazon.com/SVEN-SAW-SVEN01-BRK-Folding-Blade/dp/B002J900EQ/ref=sr_1_9?dchild=1&keywords=camp+saw&qid=1599828450&sr=8-9
The blade is in the handle when not in use
 
Last edited:

Fredricksen

Member
Bringing axes and hatchets...

When you cannot bring your cornhole game along.. ax throwing sure passes the time while drinking..
And when added to any instagram photo they instantly add that authentic wilderness feel.. just like brand new timberland boots and a bikini top.

(The above statement is said with sarcasm just dripping from it.. )
 
  • Like
Reactions: WVI

DirtWhiskey

Western Dirt Rat
Slightly off topic but why does everybody use forks? I find no use for them. Or spoons. I carry chopsticks. And a mortar and pestle. I can then mush all of my food up and slurp it up like noodles. Steaks are hard but I might as well get some practice before I lose all my teeth.

PS. I have never been out camping with a vehicle without an axe. In 25 years of wandering around the west I can count the trips, aside from trailhead to trailhead camps, where I've not used an axe on one hand. That said, this is one of my favorite threads ever on EP. A bowsaw? Yeah I have one. It's in my kit and I use it to clear the occasional branch. Once every decade or so.
 
Last edited:

nitro_rat

On a Suburban Excursion
Stighly off topic but why does everybody use forks?
Since you asked...

A lot of people like "sporks." I have found the spork to be one of the dumbest inventions of all time. The tiny tines are useless as a fork. It's too leaky to use effectively for anything you need a spoon for. Dumb idea.

This brings us to the fork. If you cooked your food right, it's the only utensil you need. If you can't cut your meat with a fork you didn't cook it right! If you can't eat your soup or whatever with a fork you need to thicken it up!

Knives are useful for food prep during cooking. Spoons are useful for serving. For eating, if you can't use a fork it wasn't cooked properly!!!

Chopsticks are great for Asian food. Asian food prepared properly is edible with chopsticks only, and slurping isn't rude...
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
Stighly off topic but why does everybody use forks? I find no use for them. Or spoons. I carry chopsticks. And a mortar and pestle. I can then mush all of my food up and slurp it up like noodles. Steaks are hard but I might as well get some practice before I lose all my teeth.

PS. I have never been out camping with a vehicle without an axe. In 25 years of wandering around the west I can count the trips, aside from trailhead to trailhead camps, where I've not used an axe on one hand. That said, this is one of my favorite threads ever on EP. A bowsaw? Yeah I have one. It's in my kit and I use it to clear the occasional branch. Once every decade or so.
Shhhhh! Don’t draw the attention of the spork people! Next thing you know there will be a dissertation posted about how titanium is the only metal and all other alloys are simply aspiring to become titanium.
 

Recommended books for Overlanding

Into Africa
by Sam Manicom
From $24.65
Long Way Down: An Epic Journey by Motorcycle from Scotlan...
by Ewan McGregor, Charley Boorman
From $5.69
Road Fever (Vintage Departures)
by Tim Cahill
From $7.49
Top