Ambulance Camper/ Expedition Rig Conversion FAQ

finboy

Member
Thanks for the follow up, I'm looking at the Demers f450 this weekend to get an idea on size and seeing one in the flesh. It's almost double the price of the other I posted in this thread, but it will be good to check out the box and get a feel of this will work for my needs.

Is the going rate for a type I usually significantly more than a type III
 

patoz

Expedition Leader
Actually, Type I's are quite common, it just depends on where you are located. Type I's are better suited in rural areas, especially if 4WD is needed, and Type III's are better suited in congested urban areas due to their shorter wheelbase and tighter turning radius.

The Patient Module (the box to you laymen :) ) is basically the same length and its size was determined by various regulations, but as of March 28, 2016, is now governed by the single instruction known as the Ground Vehicle Standard for Ambulances, CAAS GVS v.1.0.

As far as price goes, there are too many variables such as make, year, location, time in service, mileage, etc. to make a straight across the board comparison when it comes to used vehicles.

My Department has all Type I's...

Med 4 - 09-09-17 (2).jpg
 
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eporter

Adventurer
It seems like it would be a lot easier to convert a type I pickup to 4wd than to convert a van to 4wd...right? I'm surprised there aren't more doing that.

It is amazing seeing the 7.3 in a pickup. Soooo much room under the hood!
 

patoz

Expedition Leader
I believe most type I have awd from the factory, and that is the main reasons rural areas but them

Most Type I, II, & III ambulances in the USA are build on Ford chassis. They are not AWD, but 4WD with manual or automatic locking front hubs. There is a big difference in the two systems.

Actually, most Type I ambulances are not 4WD since they are used almost everywhere, including suburban areas. If they are used in very rural or in off-road areas, or owned by Fire Departments where they may double as a Rescue Vehicle, then most likely they are 4WD.
 

finboy

Member
*sigh* how did I make the awd/4wd mistake, it was a long week :coffeedrink:

Very interesting that 2wd type ones are chosen. I've talked with a coworker who is a volunteer in a rural area of Alberta and he was mentioning the driver for the type I was picked by areas more rural. Then again we are in Alberta so snow is likely a much bigger deciding factor that areas which might have a temperate climate, and only need 4wd if they are actually expected to go off road. Alberta and BC health service seem to favour type iii's, yet Saskatchewan seems to have an abundance of type ii's

6 hours and counting, will update this post soon.

Update: I'm curious to hear everyone's take on this thing, it has 237k Km's (150k miles), and low hours. This makes me suspect it was mostly highway miles, as the other I've been looking at has 100k miles, but 5000 hours of service. This is an alberta rig, so minor frame rust is not surprising, and the airbag support in the rear is a nice feature.

Anyways, pics!






 
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patoz

Expedition Leader
...we are in Alberta so snow is likely a much bigger deciding factor that areas which might have a temperate climate, and only need 4wd if they are actually expected to go off road.
Exactly! In areas where the terrain dictates it, I would expect to see more 4WD units than non-4WD units. But as a general rule, agencies don't purchases 4WD units due to the added cost, maintenance, and reduced fuel mileage.
 

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michics

New member
1991 E350 7.3 Ambulance

Hi guys,

I'm a newbie here and have had thoughts of going with a ambulance as tow vehicle for race car trailer and overnight sleeping at the track. So I have found a 1991 E350 7.3 IDI with 75k miles, and supposedly minimal rust. They're asking $5500. The vehicle is 300 miles away from me and I have not went to look at it yet. The current owners have not done much of anything to the interior. They apparently drove it to work. They claim it is great mechanical condition. They've replaced radiator, alternator, and tires recently. The vehicle is in northern wisconsin and if it spent it's life there I can understand the low mileage and low rust. In northern wisconsin small towns they do not use salt. And their ambulances sit in heated buildings for days on end waiting for the next call. Probably low engine hours and generally low use.

So, I'm looking for your thoughts on this old of a vehicle. Anything regarding the box that I should watch out for. Are parts for the 7.3 hard to get ? Tow capability ?
I've requested more pictures and before I decide to go look at it I wondered if this is a bad pursuit.

Thanks

Mike
 

finboy

Member
Earlier in this thread, alternators were mentioned as something to watch for I believe. Not sure how to identify the proper ambulance one, I hope someone can answer that for you.
 

RiderBloke

Observer
Hi guys,

I'm a newbie here and have had thoughts of going with a ambulance as tow vehicle for race car trailer and overnight sleeping at the track. So I have found a 1991 E350 7.3 IDI with 75k miles, and supposedly minimal rust. They're asking $5500. The vehicle is 300 miles away from me and I have not went to look at it yet. The current owners have not done much of anything to the interior. They apparently drove it to work. They claim it is great mechanical condition. They've replaced radiator, alternator, and tires recently. The vehicle is in northern wisconsin and if it spent it's life there I can understand the low mileage and low rust. In northern wisconsin small towns they do not use salt. And their ambulances sit in heated buildings for days on end waiting for the next call. Probably low engine hours and generally low use.

So, I'm looking for your thoughts on this old of a vehicle. Anything regarding the box that I should watch out for. Are parts for the 7.3 hard to get ? Tow capability ?
I've requested more pictures and before I decide to go look at it I wondered if this is a bad pursuit.

Thanks

Mike
Also look at the weight ratings on the vehicle stickers. I think the Ford ambulances do not give a lot of room for extra weight. Certainly the MDT vehicles give a lot more, even the GMC or Chevrolet as I read the stickers. Hitch weight comes into play if you are towing a heavy load.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

epinfRN

New member
Isolator

Hey y'all. Hoping for some info on isolators or battery switches. As previously mentioned in the thread I have a 2006 6.0PSD Type 2. I bought it after having been decommissioned and somewhere along the line someone tore out much of the stock electrical equipment, but I still have posts to charge my house batteries off of the alternators (of which there are two but I have no idea how many amps they put out together). This brings me to my question.

I have two 100AH AGM deep cycle batteries that I plan on charging off the charger inverter, off solar AND off the alternators. Given this info, and the unknown amperage of the combined alternators, what kind of isolator am I looking for? If its of any help to the question I have noted that there is a 100amp breaker that I plan on charging off of. There is also a "commander 350" unit inline just back from said 100amp breaker whose function I don't quite understand but it doesn't seem obvious to me. Thanks for the help!
 

finboy

Member
*sigh* how did I make the awd/4wd mistake, it was a long week :coffeedrink:

Very interesting that 2wd type ones are chosen. I've talked with a coworker who is a volunteer in a rural area of Alberta and he was mentioning the driver for the type I was picked by areas more rural. Then again we are in Alberta so snow is likely a much bigger deciding factor that areas which might have a temperate climate, and only need 4wd if they are actually expected to go off road. Alberta and BC health service seem to favour type iii's, yet Saskatchewan seems to have an abundance of type ii's

6 hours and counting, will update this post soon.

Update: I'm curious to hear everyone's take on this thing, it has 237k Km's (150k miles), and low hours. This makes me suspect it was mostly highway miles, as the other I've been looking at has 100k miles, but 5000 hours of service. This is an alberta rig, so minor frame rust is not surprising, and the airbag support in the rear is a nice feature.

Anyways, pics!






A few items of note, the seller just dropped the price, still curious to hear everyone's take on the value of this.

Upon test driving, my gf hated the lack of headroom, engine/compressor noise, and the lack of floor space. This is what happens when you are raised on trailers and rv's
 

eporter

Adventurer
Finboy, what's the cost on that? 4wd?

My '97 had 170k and 7000hours, mileage to hours ratio can vary a lot. I forget the number of miles the factory quotes an hour of idling is equivalent to. 20-30?
 
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