Aluminess nerf bars

Justgosurfin

Active member
How do they do with any impacts? Wondering if something custom in steel might be better. Any feedback would be great!
 

86scotty

Explorer
Did you mean Aluminess NERF bars? If so they are basically just for looks. Not at all a rock slider. Still, none look better IMO. I miss mine.
 

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bbbthreat

Member
Can always do some rock sliders. As long as you don't mind welding and painting yourself. I did mine at a 0* angle, 1/2" from the pinch weld. Wanted mine as more of step and a means of keeping wayward doors away. Not going full hard core offroad with it. Did some gussets and angled tubing to brace. Strong enough I can jack it up with, and not worried if I kick up a big rock. You can set the angle however you want it, add some steps if need be; pretty much configure it however you want. They carry lots of fab parts.

http://www.chassisunlimited.com/product/fabparts.html

http://www.chassisunlimited.com/product/armor-bumpers/rock-sliders.html

They currently have a 20% off sale right now, because their prices are going up next year due to the tariffs. Use code: 2019.

If not, cough up for the sliders from WeldTec. Those babies are sweet.

https://weldtecdesigns.com/product/e-series-van-rock-sliders/
 
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bbbthreat

Member
IMG_1598.JPGIMG_1544.JPG
Photos for reference for what I did on my build.

If you are worried about how the aluminum compares to steel when actually used, I grabbed some screen shots.

IMG_1627.PNGFellow forum member who had installed Aluminess nerf bars. Ended up bending his.
IMG_1628.PNG
 
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bbbthreat

Member
Welded to the frame. Was initially going to do a bolt in affair, but the thought of spacers and doing 64 holes was a no go. Who wants to Swiss cheese their frame? Easier just to burn it in. And if the time comes to remove it, a sawzall comes to the rescue. Now, I know my setup is knowhere near as strong (or pretty) as Jeremy's at WeldTec, but it was perfect for what I needed; Strong enough to jack and lift the van if needed (already tested) and got the step and side protection I wanted. The rockers are going to be better protected than most of the other offerings out there, at a reasonable price. Plus, I got a chance to do a project. 😀

If I were to do it over, I would have utilized larger sized 1/4" scab plates, made some longer length gussets, and gone with a square tube for the main body. I was on a tight budget and timeline, but a good learning experience and I have no regrets overall.
 

Alloy

Well-known member
Steel will slide on rock and sand, aluminum won't.

I've welded the tube to flat bar and then bolted the flat bar to the frame using existing holes.
 

Justgosurfin

Active member
Welded to the frame. Was initially going to do a bolt in affair, but the thought of spacers and doing 64 holes was a no go. Who wants to Swiss cheese their frame? Easier just to burn it in. And if the time comes to remove it, a sawzall comes to the rescue. Now, I know my setup is knowhere near as strong (or pretty) as Jeremy's at WeldTec, but it was perfect for what I needed; Strong enough to jack and lift the van if needed (already tested) and got the step and side protection I wanted. The rockers are going to be better protected than most of the other offerings out there, at a reasonable price. Plus, I got a chance to do a project. 😀

If I were to do it over, I would have utilized larger sized 1/4" scab plates, made some longer length gussets, and gone with a square tube for the main body. I was on a tight budget and timeline, but a good learning experience and I have no regrets overall.[/QUOTE
Welded to the frame. Was initially going to do a bolt in affair, but the thought of spacers and doing 64 holes was a no go. Who wants to Swiss cheese their frame? Easier just to burn it in. And if the time comes to remove it, a sawzall comes to the rescue. Now, I know my setup is knowhere near as strong (or pretty) as Jeremy's at WeldTec, but it was perfect for what I needed; Strong enough to jack and lift the van if needed (already tested) and got the step and side protection I wanted. The rockers are going to be better protected than most of the other offerings out there, at a reasonable price. Plus, I got a chance to do a project. 😀

If I were to do it over, I would have utilized larger sized 1/4" scab plates, made some longer length gussets, and gone with a square tube for the main body. I was on a tight budget and timeline, but a good learning experience and I have no regrets overall.
Sounds like perfect logic to me! What’s a scab plate?

I’m thinking we’ll do something similar this year
 

bbbthreat

Member
Scab plate is a plate of metal that is welded onto the frame to allow a larger footprint to distribute the weight or force exerted on the sliders. Rather than having 1.5" steel tube welded directly the frame and distributing it over say a 7 sq in area, you would now spread that load over a 24-36 sq in area if you used a (6x4 or 6x6) scab plate. Less likely now to do damage to your frame now, and better distribute your weight if you are using your sliders as sliders.
 

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