Africa Overland with a Jeep Wrangler: Lost in HDR

zeroland

Adventurer
The website 'Lost in HDR' might be the very 1st overland travelers to use a Jeep Wranger to complete a crossing of the African Continent from North to South following the West Coast.

The website is a blur on the sensors as the visually stunning HDR photos leap out at you... Each photo has a narrative associated with the moment.

First steps in Africa. Tangier. Overlanders meets here. Lots of Land Rovers, and one Jeep Wrangler...


I chose the road less traveled. Now, where the hell am I? ... Nigeria...






After almost got arrested in Congo Brazzaville for making video on dock. We unsuccessfully tried to cross Congo river to Kinshasa. There was no possibilities for our car - not today, not tomorrow, not after tomorrow... so we bought all barge... After we got to other country - Congo DRC, we almost got deported back to Brazzaville for illegally-not official-crossing... After few days of nightmare - we in DRC! And one more - if you think, get dinner in Cannes, Sn. Trapeze, Zurich, Moscow, Paris or Tokyo is expensive, go to Kinshasa - to open your eyes.






I have asked for more information on the Jeep (engine, modifications, equipment etc) and will post the information on the Overland Live blog once I hear back from Kristina & Nerijus.
 

haven

Expedition Leader
Thanks for sharing. The web site is http://www.lostinhdr.com The photographer's style is not what I would choose, but certainly illustrative of the journey. I enjoyed the photos of the daily lives of the folks who live along the route.

There's a 13 minute video on the web site that gives a good idea of the terrain and road surfaces one faces on a trip down the west side of the African continent today.

The Jeep looks like a Sahara or Mojave package, stock with Rubicon wheels and tires.

I'd like to know more about the way the travelers spent their nights. I didn't notice photos of camping, so I assume they didn't camp out often.
 

zeroland

Adventurer
I received a response from Nerijus Strumila, the owner of the Jeep:

We took Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 2.8 CRD automatic transmission.
I just put on BF Goodrich tires - that's it, no more modification had been made.
Unlimited (means 4 doors) and you can make 200 cm bed in back of Jeep, so, no tents have been used.

I took additional 40l Diesel, and 27l water. But we did not used it, there was plenty of diesel to buy all over route (even in Mauritania, or Nigeria Boko Haram area).

We made 24000 km across Africa and did not have any problems, no punctures, no technical problems or border crossings. All people very kind and happy to see overlanders, no bribes (even in Nigeria or Congo DRC) no asking for gifts. We very surprised that it feel very safe. Even more safe than in Lithuania.

Everybody was so exited about our car, they never saw Jeep's… only some Japanese or UK cars…

I'm still working on pictures, everyday put some of them. As you may know, picture can say 1000 words, thats why I decide to make Photoblog instead of wordpress or something :).

 

haven

Expedition Leader
The photos show lots of muddy roads, but not the bottomless, wheel-sucking mud that makes recovery so difficult. I'd like to know how often 4 wheel drive was used on the trip.

The report that diesel fuel was easily available is very useful.
 

DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
Sorry, that was real mud!

The photos show lots of muddy roads, but not the bottomless, wheel-sucking mud that makes recovery so difficult. I'd like to know how often 4 wheel drive was used on the trip.

The report that diesel fuel was easily available is very useful.
Chip,

With deepest respect, you are sadly mistaken about the mud. Look again at the multiple images of big trucks sunk to the bodies. They came over one of the worst stretches of road in the world; Nigerian border to Mamfe and then continued through West Cameroon. I know those roads well. African mud puts almost anything else to shame for quantity and quality. (And if you looked closely, you will note that they had to deal with a bit of the real truck killers, washboard and broken pavement - both much harder on the vehicle than mud.)

They also drove across pans in Namibia, but they did that in the dry.

For your enjoyment, a bit of West Cameroonian mud:

Mud!  022.jpg

Mud!  021.jpg

Going to take a bit of digging.
 
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GetOutThere

Adventurer
Good find, and great video!

Certainly makes me want to take my JK to Africa.

I bet there aren't many Canadian plated Jeeps over there ;)
 

haven

Expedition Leader
Thanks for the correction about the mud! I'll look for the photos of Nigeria and Cameroon.

The reports of people being excited by the novelty of seeing a Jeep has a darker side. If you break down (and I know these travelers had a trouble-free journey), it's unlikely you'll find anyone who has any experience fixing the darn thing. Jeep does have authorized dealers in Nigeria, Namibia, and South Africa.
 

DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
Exotic Vehicles

Exotic vehicles are always a risk, but there is no vehicle (at least none sold in the US) that has universal support. (The one exception might be a diesel Land Cruiser troop carrier with 750x16 tires.)

As noted by the Howes, who have taken their Tiger to over 50 countries, and confirmed my my personal experience of owning two Blazers in Africa for decades, things aren't as bad as you may fear.

-- Your truck won't stop running just because you took it outside its original sales zone.

-- You WILL have to pay attention to stocking/carrying all of your consumables - filters, belts, etc. Similarly, you will have to have specialty tools and shop manuals. (For example, the wrench needed to service the bearing on a Dana 44 front axle.)

-- The engine is the least important part of the truck, as it is the least likely to fail.

-- Most failures will be auxiliary systems, like batteries, wires, tires, brakes, etc. Third World mechanics are well used to cobbling up repairs for such things.

-- You will need to plot your travels to hit countries with real dealers or low customs duties where you can arrange to receive shipments of spares. This can be true, even in the US; I just met a French couple who had to ship tires for their Iveco Daily 4x4 based camper from France; they could find none in the US.

I was about to tow this vehicle to Europe when the carburetors tore their diaphragms in southern Algeria. (The crisis was averted when the owners found a wrecked Range Rover in Tamanrasset and bought the carbs for $500.)



MY problem, was tires:



Started with seven and arrived in Genoa with three and a half! (And I bought new ones off of a Jeep CJ-5.)

So, if you like Jeeps, go for it.
 
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nwoods

Expedition Leader
The photos show lots of muddy roads, but not the bottomless, wheel-sucking mud that makes recovery so difficult. I'd like to know how often 4 wheel drive was used on the trip.
You need to watch the video! From 6:00 to about 8:30 in the 13 minute video shows some pretty serious mud.
 

grogie

Like to Camp
Thanks for sharing. The web site is http://www.lostinhdr.com The photographer's style is not what I would choose, but certainly illustrative of the journey. I enjoyed the photos of the daily lives of the folks who live along the route.

There's a 13 minute video on the web site that gives a good idea of the terrain and road surfaces one faces on a trip down the west side of the African continent today.

The Jeep looks like a Sahara or Mojave package, stock with Rubicon wheels and tires.

I'd like to know more about the way the travelers spent their nights. I didn't notice photos of camping, so I assume they didn't camp out often.
Beautiful pictures and looks like a bit of traveling! Very nice.
 

SSF556

SE Expedition Society
No winch, no lift, no lockers, and an American vehicle? But how didn't they die!?

Only way it could have been more forum shattering is if the vehicle was gasoline. :sombrero:
Yep....many heads exploded across this forum...
 
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