AdventureTaco - turbodb's build and adventures

SBDuller

Member
That bent post is a 'common' problem. I say common, but you and I are probably the only ones to have this occur from the same seller. My replacement unit arrived with good posts but with a fluctuating voltage of 0-6V, and would not take a charge. I kept hearing in e-mail that I'd be taken care of, but nothing came of that, and eventually I turned the dead battery over for recycle. I reverted to an older heavier Odessey 31M as my second, and its going on 5 years despite the TacomaG2 alternator. I do give it periodic solar charge boosts.
And I thought your battery box build was pretty cool!
 

turbodb

Well-known member
That bent post is a 'common' problem. I say common, but you and I are probably the only ones to have this occur from the same seller. My replacement unit arrived with good posts but with a fluctuating voltage of 0-6V, and would not take a charge. I kept hearing in e-mail that I'd be taken care of, but nothing came of that, and eventually I turned the dead battery over for recycle. I reverted to an older heavier Odessey 31M as my second, and its going on 5 years despite the TacomaG2 alternator. I do give it periodic solar charge boosts.
And I thought your battery box build was pretty cool!
Bummer to hear about your experience there. I've actually had a reasonably good customer experience with them - I had a battery go bad and they sent me a replacement with just a few photos from me. Had it in 3 days. Glad it sounds like your Odyssey is doing well though, that's all that really matters is that you get something that works! 👍
 

turbodb

Well-known member
Frame Rust! (and Slider Maintenance)
Every now and then, there's some un-sexy, mundane, stuff that we do to our trucks just to keep them in good working order. These don't usually get a lot of publicity since they do little to increase the cool factor, and don't have the high-profile pizzazz worthy of the 'gram.

So today, I did a bit of maintenance. Since getting the @RelentlessFab sliders installed a couple of years ago, they've done everything I've asked of them and have required essentially no maintenance. But, as time has passed, I've noticed that the area where they were welded to the frame has started to develop some surface rust.


This is of course, normal. The frame was ground to bare metal there, and welding burnt off any surrounding paint that was left. A bit of spray paint was applied afterwards, but there are lots of rocks that get kicked up down there, so seeing it wear off after a couple years is to be expected.

The fix is reasonably easy. I started with a wire cup on the angle grinder, which i used to remove as much of the rust from the frame and slider plates as possible. Then, I applied some Rustoleum Rusty Metal primer to hopefully convert the last of the rust.

Finally, a few coats of black Rustoleum Professional enamel, and everything under the truck looked like new again.


...and yes all yee keyboard commandos of the internet, I know that there's likely rust inside the frame as well due to paint removal from welding. But for now at least, I'm betting that the frame of the truck will be just fine for as long as I'm going to be driving it.
 

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roving1

Well-known member
Frame Rust! (and Slider Maintenance)
...and yes all yee keyboard commandos of the internet, I know that there's likely rust inside the frame as well due to paint removal from welding. But for now at least, I'm betting that the frame of the truck will be just fine for as long as I'm going to be driving it.
You live on the good side of the country to make that bet. My rusted though from the inside welds and eventual perforation in other spots of my then 6 year old truck in MI would laugh at that bet lol. But at least I did get a new frame out of it and the vehicle still lives on as my winter beater with frame painting the outside and oiling the inside. Can't say as much for the body though lol. The beginning of the end has begun for that for sure.1918768_143983678750_5800561_n.jpg
 

turbodb

Well-known member
You live on the good side of the country to make that bet. My rusted though from the inside welds and eventual perforation in other spots of my then 6 year old truck in MI would laugh at that bet lol. But at least I did get a new frame out of it and the vehicle still lives on as my winter beater with frame painting the outside and oiling the inside. Can't say as much for the body though lol. The beginning of the end has begun for that for sure.View attachment 601943
Oh yeah, I'm definitely glad to be over here where the road salt is minimal. And of course, I'm careful to always wash off after trips, rinsing out the inside of the frame as well!
 

turbodb

Well-known member
Colchuck, Cherries, and Chainsaws
Having wrapped up the dual battery install approximately 12 hours before departure time, we were off the next morning for a couple relaxed days of camping and hiking in one of our favorite areas of the Cascades, near Leavenworth, WA. Not only would this be the first trip with the redundant power - a good thing since we didn't plan on much driving, it would also be the first time we'd see the newly painted wheels in the great outdoors.


Well, those look great, I think.

We arrived at camp just after 1:30pm - on a Wednesday. This is key, since this camp site along Icicle Creek is a popular one, and we've been unable to snag it the last few times we've shown up on a Saturday. With it's own private beach, plenty of flat space, and both shade and sun, there's really no better spot to camp in the area.


The only problem with this site is that immediately next to the best spot to park, there is a dead tree. It's been there far longer than we've been visiting the site - likely for 20 years or more - and over the years, it's degraded noticeably from insect activity; to the point where we've recently been hesitant to park under it for safety reasons.

I mean, the likelihood that it would fall on us is probably low, but why take the chance? And so, the last several times we've gone camping, I've brought along the chainsaw. Unfortunately, on previous visits, there's always been some other bozo parked directly in it's fall path and we've been unable to get the site - opting instead for another awesome site nearby.

But today was different! I pulled out the saw and sighted the direction I wanted the tree to fall.


As is often the case, I'd underestimated the size of this project - literally. The diameter of the trunk was much larger than I'd remembered - and significantly longer than the 20" bar on my Stihl MS-261. As such, notching required work from both sides of the tree.




No logger, my adrenaline was pumping as I cut the notch. And as I progressed, I was extremely glad to be tackling this project - while there was still some solid wood, much of what I was cutting through simply crumbled away before the spinning chain!



And, the reason for that punkiness was blatantly obvious, mu cuts disrupting the superhighway tunnels they'd created for themselves.


Notch complete, it was time to start on the back cut. I knew this is where the rubber would hit the road and things would start to get (more) dangerous. I'd evaluated the tree-lean prior to getting started, and the few remaining branches were on the side that I was planning to fall the tree - but having done this only a few times in the past, I was still a bit jumpy as I started cutting out the back half of the tree. I took it slow, stepping back to evaluate the progress several times.



And then - as the saw inched towards he notch - the back of the cut started to open up. A good sign, and one that was my signal to evacuate the immediate area for the excitement.

And what excitement it was - as I looked over at @mrs.turbodb who was taking the photos, she too was mesmerized, and I had to remind her - "Take pictures!" - 🤣 I'm sure I'd have been in a similar situation with the camera in hand.



Needless to say, I was quite happy with the situation - the tree had fallen exactly where I'd planned - and now it was a matter of evaluating the job and cleaning up the downfall. First - a look at the stump - which looked great to me, the small amount of uncut wood acting as a hinge; the length of the 20" bar visible along the back (left in the photo) side of the hinge where I'd been cutting when the tree started it's fall.


An hour later, clean up was complete and we were able to move the truck into position. Yep, right in line with the fall path of the tree - now a much safer place for us and future campers.


We spent the remainder of the afternoon and evening enjoying ourselves in one of our favorite places as blue skies and on-and-off sprinkles of rain passed overhead, eventually making the 45 minute drive back into town to enjoy dinner at one of our favorite restaurants.

Hahaha, this was a special kind of "camping."




There was a reasonably constant - albeit light - rain throughout the night. The pitter-patter on the rain fly, along with the sound of the creek, made for a splendid night of sleep and it wasn't until nearly 8:00am that we finally decided to get out of bed - the weather once again a mix of clouds and sun, and birds and deer out for their morning meal around us.

- - - - -

Don't miss the rest of the story, and all the remaining photos that don't fit here (due to max post size). Hopefully that can change in the future, but until then...

Keep reading the rest here
Colchuck, Cherries, and Chainsaws



.
 

ns7i

New member
I mean, the likelihood that it would fall on us is probably low,
I was backpacking in the Wind River Mountains once and was in camp when a tree fell within feet of where I was standing. It completely changed my perspective on choosing safe places to camp. Good call on taking out that big guy.
 

turbodb

Well-known member
...As we pulled up to our spot - campsite #4 - at Twin Sisters, a surprise! Tents were already setup in "our spot." And what's this? - someone else's name on the reserved sign. Uh oh. I checked the reservation. Yep - I had a confirmation email, my credit card had been charged. And then, I noticed - we'd reserved spot #64 - as far away from Twin Sisters as you could physically get, a site that I'd looked at but - I thought - only in passing. There'd clearly been a snafu somewhere along the way - either in the web site, or between the keyboard and monitor....

 

turbodb

Well-known member
...We explored leisurely before heading back to the truck and continuing on our way through the maze of roads that wound up, around, and through the forest - in and out of trees, across wildflower filled meadows, and to several spectacular viewpoints. Even destinationless and meandering, it turned out to be my favorite part of the trip so far....

Keep reading the rest here
From City of Rocks to Craters of the Moon



Keep reading the rest here
From City of Rocks to Craters of the Moon
 
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