Adventures of "Sally Ross" Fuso Camper by Phoenix Pop Up Campers PHXFG

loonwheeler

Adventurer
I was just curious if you had any supplemental system to help starting in cold weather. Anything like starting fluid system or hydronic heater?
 

Decanter

Adventurer
They do make a cold weather kit which I believe includes an PCV heater among other things. There would be a switch on the dash if you had it.
 

Butch1979

Family Adventurer
They do make a cold weather kit which I believe includes an PCV heater among other things. There would be a switch on the dash if you had it.
Now you've got me wondering! I'll have to go check it out and see if I have that (tons of switches on this thing). It might also entail reading the owners manual, and we all know how rewarding that is.

For what it's worth, I've never flipped any switches while starting it in the cold and it's never skipped a beat.

Cheers

Butch
 

unkamonkey

Explorer
Sort of apples to oranges. On my '92, the glow plugs don't come on until it gets below 40 deg F. I've started it at 0 degrees and it was a bit cranky but after a few trys it did keep running. I've never used the engine heater on it.
 

Czechsix

Watching you from a ridge
They do make a cold weather kit which I believe includes an PCV heater among other things. There would be a switch on the dash if you had it.
Interesting, I haven't heard about that. I do know that there are some mods for colder weather, such as heaters to keep the DEF fluid enough.

My truck was originally a plow truck in Colorado, only has the heated mirrors and a few heat pads on the engine oil pan and transmission. But then again, with a 2012, there's a possibility that the low temp package wasn't offered by the factory.
 

Butch1979

Family Adventurer
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Valley of the Gods! Need to add a bunch of photos, we've been out so much it's hard to take the time to update the thread.
 
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Butch1979

Family Adventurer
Idaho

We did a few week trip to Idaho with the paddleboards, mtn bikes and BEER! Beautiful area.

Break Break:

Super single wheels.... It's about time to change tires, so this might be the time to do the wheels but I'm getting quotes of $550 per wheel... DAMN. I'm also wondering if the spare will fit in the compartment made for it in the back of our camper. Is the traction really that much better? Definitely looks cooler LOL.

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Czechsix

Watching you from a ridge
The traction might not necessarily be better, much depends on what you get for rubber, but airing down always helps with any tread design. A couple of big advantages are lessened drag through soft terrain - mud, sand and the like. This'll only happen though, if you run the wheels with the same track width. Second big deal is rocks that get pinned between the duals, tearing sidewalls.

Yep, they're expensive. The tires aren't cheap either, and then you get to research load ratings. Fun fun fun.

The Toyo M608Z's seem to work fine, at least I've had no issues with them. Pricey package though, that's for sure.
 

Butch1979

Family Adventurer
The traction might not necessarily be better, much depends on what you get for rubber, but airing down always helps with any tread design. A couple of big advantages are lessened drag through soft terrain - mud, sand and the like. This'll only happen though, if you run the wheels with the same track width. Second big deal is rocks that get pinned between the duals, tearing sidewalls.

Yep, they're expensive. The tires aren't cheap either, and then you get to research load ratings. Fun fun fun.

The Toyo M608Z's seem to work fine, at least I've had no issues with them. Pricey package though, that's for sure.
I'm kind of leaning towards just leaving well enough alone.... We've put 10K miles on this rig in six months and have camped in some really cool places. I'm not sure that I need it to be much more capable. I do worry about the difficulty of currently changing a flat with duals vs singles. I'm also only running 235 85 16s and the moment and can't help but want to fill those wheel wells a little LOL.

Always appreciate advice on tires/size people have used successfully.

Butch
 

pugslyyy

Expedition Vehicle Engineer Guy
We did a few week trip to Idaho with the paddleboards, mtn bikes and BEER! Beautiful area.

Break Break:

Super single wheels.... It's about time to change tires, so this might be the time to do the wheels but I'm getting quotes of $550 per wheel... DAMN. I'm also wondering if the spare will fit in the compartment made for it in the back of our camper. Is the traction really that much better? Definitely looks cooler LOL.

View attachment 356539View attachment 356540View attachment 356541View attachment 356542
It's not so much about traction as it is about off-highway handling.

I run the M608Z tires on the 19.5 rims - it is the only option that doesn't require derating the load-carrying capacity. I doubt that you are nearly as heavy as I am, so you probably have more options available to you.

Definitely weigh your rig front and rear, fully loaded with gear, fuel, water, rocks, etc to get an idea of what your max load is and then buy tires and rims based on that.

Figure $500 per rim and $500 per tire, or $5k total including spare.
 

dlh62c

Explorer
That's a very good looking and capable truck and camper there. It looks like there isn't any rear recovery points.

Have you considered adding a rear bumper and mud flaps?

Duals can and will take you a lot of places and yes there's disadvantages to them off-road. Don & Kim Greene traveled the world in a Canter running duals. If the road gets rocky and rough, walk the route and/or use a spotter. Everyone hates a chipped and cracked windshield, so before entering a paved roadway, stop, get out and inspect the duals and undercarriage for any loose rocks. The TruckCamper crowd has some tips for running duals on the beach.

Rocks can get caught between the rear duals and there's a way to dislodge them;

Duals will load up with mud, so know what you're driving into.
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unkamonkey

Explorer
I've been driving my Mitsu-Fuso for over 18 years and have gotten a rock stuck between a dual once. I knew of the chain method, I had the chains. No, battery box in front, holding tanks in the rear. No other vehicles around to pull it out. Run the inside tire up on blocks and remove the outside dual? I chose to get a hammer out that I could take a swipe at the rock with. After about a half hour, a few "Twenty Somethings" I had been camping with stopped. It still took about another quarter hour to get the rock out.
It would have quicker to take off the outside dual tire.
I didn't save the rock.
 

dlh62c

Explorer
Rocks stuck between dual wheels isn't a recent problem. Patents have been filed on devices to eject the rocks. I wouldn't drive for miles with the ejector in place, but I can see stopping, flipping the ejector down, pulling forward, eject the rock, stop, flipping the ejector up and continue on your merry way.

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