Adventure Brick

Photobug

Active member
Still not sure what the eventual plan is but am very impressed by the quality of the work. It looks very professionally built. I see you have the child storage figured out so far but not sure where adult storage is going to happen. Let us know where you plan to sleep and why that would impede a hinge for the toilet.

Spitballing on your head needs. Use a two piece hinged board for the top and side of the head storage. Use magnet(s) in the frame to hold it in place. Lift one side and remove the whole structure fold it then store it out of the way to use the head. You might be able to bifold it up to the forward wall flat to access the head. No way to stand and pee with only 4 feet though.

I hope the girl on the bottom bunk is already full height.
 

boxtoutside

New member
nice work! having a trailer like that with the option for a rooftop tent is high on my list. Did you build it with the capability of running a roof rack?
 

Tifun

Member
nice work! having a trailer like that with the option for a rooftop tent is high on my list. Did you build it with the capability of running a roof rack?
I did! I put stud placement based on the eventual rack or tent. Once my kiddos outgrow the inside they will have the option to go on top or an awning room. Going to let them decide once we get to that point. Probably a good year or 2 off.


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Tifun

Member
nice work! having a trailer like that with the option for a rooftop tent is high on my list. Did you build it with the capability of running a roof rack?

I did! I put stud placement based on the eventual rack or tent. Once my kiddos outgrow the inside they will have the option to go on top or an awning room. Going to let them decide once we get to that point. Probably a good year or 2 off.


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Tifun

Member
Still not sure what the eventual plan is but am very impressed by the quality of the work. It looks very professionally built. I see you have the child storage figured out so far but not sure where adult storage is going to happen. Let us know where you plan to sleep and why that would impede a hinge for the toilet.

Spitballing on your head needs. Use a two piece hinged board for the top and side of the head storage. Use magnet(s) in the frame to hold it in place. Lift one side and remove the whole structure fold it then store it out of the way to use the head. You might be able to bifold it up to the forward wall flat to access the head. No way to stand and pee with only 4 feet though.

I hope the girl on the bottom bunk is already full height.
We are still working out how storage will go. The bench on our last trip easily held a full weekends worth of clothing. Cooking gear and such stayed in the truck. The eventual plan will be an awning room or another RTT for the kiddos once they outgrow the space which we anticipate 1-2 years. Interior width is 5’ so that helps.


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Tifun

Member
Were you able to get ACM big enough to have seamless roof?

My local sign guy only has 4x8
Yes, My sign guy gave me his distributor who happened to be local and they had 5x10 which I cut down to 5x8. They didn’t have red on hand so I did white which I think was a really good choice for sun deflection.


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ghcoe

Adventurer
Hi,
Would like to comment you have a great looking trailer. I too build square drops, but out of foam. They do share the Harbor Freight trailer.

I would like to ask about the axle though. Looks like it is a direct replacement to the original axle. Still using the original slipper springs?

I would recommend adding what I call a back bone in your build. The Harbor Freight trailers have a weak tongue design and have failed on trailers intended for on road use. With off road use they will certainly be a weak point. The cure is to add a back bone made of 2"x2" steel tube. On my build I added a receiver to each end. This allowed me to be able to change from a regular ball hitch (road use) to a pintle hitch (off road use). It also allows you to remove the hitch all together for campsite security. It will also move the hitch point down about 2-3" which can lead to not needing a drop hitch which can be a snag point on the trails. This also adds the ability to add a rear hitch point for bike rack or cargo carrier. Also a good recovery point if needing a tug from behind since it is a direct link to the tow vehicles hitch. The spine also attaches to each cross member which distributes the tow loads across the entire trailer frame. The spine acts as a lever across the entire trailer frame instead of the short 13" of the original tongue.

If interested you can see my foamie square drop in action through most of this video. It is made of foam and canvas. The only wood in the build is the floor. Trailer weight is 400lbs empty.


Hope this helps George.
 

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Tifun

Member
Hi,
Would like to comment you have a great looking trailer. I too build square drops, but out of foam. They do share the Harbor Freight trailer.

I would like to ask about the axle though. Looks like it is a direct replacement to the original axle. Still using the original slipper springs?

I would recommend adding what I call a back bone in your build. The Harbor Freight trailers have a weak tongue design and have failed on trailers intended for on road use. With off road use they will certainly be a weak point. The cure is to add a back bone made of 2"x2" steel tube. On my build I added a receiver to each end. This allowed me to be able to change from a regular ball hitch (road use) to a pintle hitch (off road use). It also allows you to remove the hitch all together for campsite security. It will also move the hitch point down about 2-3" which can lead to not needing a drop hitch which can be a snag point on the trails. This also adds the ability to add a rear hitch point for bike rack or cargo carrier. Also a good recovery point if needing a tug from behind since it is a direct link to the tow vehicles hitch. The spine also attaches to each cross member which distributes the tow loads across the entire trailer frame. The spine acts as a lever across the entire trailer frame instead of the short 13" of the original tongue.

If interested you can see my foamie square drop in action through most of this video. It is made of foam and canvas. The only wood in the build is the floor. Trailer weight is 400lbs empty.


Hope this helps George.
Thanks for the great input. I will say that the hitch is for sure the weak link on the trailer. I keep looking at it and trying to come up with a plan to strengthen it up and your idea is pretty solid!

As for mine I went to a local trailer parts store about bought a blank 3500lbs axle that included the spring pack bungs. I also picked up new u bolts and 5 lug hubs. The swap was pretty simple but not direct. You align the bungs in the spring packs, put the bend up, tighten the ubolts, then weld the bungs to the axle to prevent it from rotating. In total I think it took about an hour total to swap out. I also found it was a lot cheaper to buy local from a non box store than online or anywhere else.


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ghcoe

Adventurer
Thanks for the axle input. I will check it out here and see what is available.

Good luck, George.
 
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