Adding height to lifted van

rhinojonson

New member
I have a 2000 E350 with a 2006 F350 front end with coil suspension. It has a 3.5" lift that was done by Salem Kroger. I'd like to get the lift up to 5" or 6" to improve the suspension. How difficult is it to add the extra couple of inches? Do I just need to replace a few parts or is it a matter of redoing the whole thing?
 

45Kevin

Adventurer
Don't know much about ferds, but since no one else has replied:
I would think that you could approach this two ways.

1. add a block under the rear leafs and a coil space in the front
2. totally new springs front and rear

In both cases you would need new shocks and maybe new flex lines on the brakes.
Again, just a semi-educated guess because I don't own any fords and haven't ever worked on a ford suspension.
 

hobovan

'00 E350SD PSD
If you are wheeling for real, say no to lift blocks. Spend the money and do it the right way.
 

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rhinojonson

New member
Thanks for the replies. I'm not doing any crazy four wheeling. My primary reason for adding some height is to smooth out the ride with some longer travel shocks like Fox 2.0s. I do explore a lot of dirt roads around CA and NV. When I hit those washboard sections, I can feel my teeth rattling. I just went from a 29 to a 31 inch tire, which helped, but I still want a smoother ride. And let's be honest, a bigger lift looks cooler too. :)
 

hobovan

'00 E350SD PSD
Yeah...wouldn't use blocks. You're looking at new custom springs front and rear, and possible ancillaries, to include what he mentioned. You will also need to do something about the camber that will be out of whack, and alignment as well. Customsuspension.com might be worth a try, or you can find a local shop. It's generally not that expensive to get the components...most of the money is in proper install and alignment.
 

ujoint

Supporting Sponsor
Is the front suspension liked? Radius arm? No easy way to lift either, looking at some fabrication and it all needs to be done by someone with skills or the van will drive and handle terrible.

I've removed quite a few modified coil sprung solid axle suspensions over the years.

Try some better quality shocks 1st, see if that improves the drive.
 

drsmonkey

Observer
Thanks for the replies. I'm not doing any crazy four wheeling. My primary reason for adding some height is to smooth out the ride with some longer travel shocks like Fox 2.0s. I do explore a lot of dirt roads around CA and NV. When I hit those washboard sections, I can feel my teeth rattling. I just went from a 29 to a 31 inch tire, which helped, but I still want a smoother ride. And let's be honest, a bigger lift looks cooler too. :)
More lift is probably not going to help smooth out washboard, and depending on how you do the lift might make it worse.

If you are not all ready doing it, the best way to smooth out washboard is to buy a compressor and some deflators. You would be amazed out how much just dropping the tire pressure will improve the ride and control.
 

Corneilius

Adventurer
Nice shocks for your current configuration and a progressive bump stop if you don't have much up travel will be easier and handle/ride better than changing springs
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
You need better shocks, built for your application, not off the shelf, fancy name brand shocks that are longer. Custom built shocks, while expensive, are cheaper than lifting it and Fox shocks.
 

Heloflyboy

Adventurer
The problem with just adding longer springs is it will throw off your front caster angle. This will make the van not steer as well as it currently does and you may end up with a death wobble. In order to fix this you will have to drop the back of the radius arm pivot point. Im sure salem kroger custom made the radius arm bracket to the frame as I used to have a van built by them.
There is absolutely no problems having blocks in the back, all you have to do is look under the back of any stock 3/4 or 1 ton dodge and they have block. There tow ratings are twice what a van is in most cases. I have run blocks for years on different vehicles and not had any problems.
 

philos

Explorer
A lift won't really "fix" how your rig goes on washboard by itself. In fact, it can worsen the problem.
I'd talk to some local off road or fabrication shops about custom valved shocks. I'd also have a look at the steering angles, etc.
And air down your tires, it helps.


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