A Hawk in the Arctic

bigskypylot

Explorer
That is a good read. And an interesting one. Thanks for posting it.
Looking at your user name, shall I assume you are a pilot? :sombrero:

So help me out... from where Im sitting that looks to be written in a way to alleviate moisture issues that exceed the capacity of the ECS.
Am I correct? I think it is odd that it does not reference it specifically.

Even agencies like the NCBI reference it with regards to relative humidity, and venting...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK219009/
Kenny,

Air at altitude is generally very dry. Water separators are used in ACM/AC packs. Here's a good link concerning that.

http://www.k-makris.gr/AircraftComponents/CoolPack/pack.htm

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_cycle_machine
 
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cdnrokon

New member
I have camped out in a tent with a -40 woods sleeping bag the biggest thing for keeping dry up north is wood stove. And you can buy a sardine wood stove that is made for a boat small and very compact stove. Have the internal chimney removable for transport but have the stove mounted in a dedicated spot.
Plain Sardine Tiny Home.jpg
 

sg1

Adventurer
I just completed a 5 months trip in South America in my other camper with a hardsided composite cabin. This year they had an extremely wet rainy season in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru and in the Andean it was sometimes in the 30 or 40s. Very similar to what we had last summer in the Arctic where we had these serious condensation problems. In my composite camper we had no condensation issues at all. This direct comparison shows that the Hawk has serious design issues.
Stefan
 

Safari997

New member
I just completed a 5 months trip in South America in my other camper with a hardsided composite cabin. This year they had an extremely wet rainy season in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru and in the Andean it was sometimes in the 30 or 40s. Very similar to what we had last summer in the Arctic where we had these serious condensation problems. In my composite camper we had no condensation issues at all. This direct comparison shows that the Hawk has serious design issues.
Stefan
What camper do you have now?
 

sg1

Adventurer
I have 2 campers, one in Canada (Hawk on a 2015 F 150) and one we use in the winter months in South America. This is a custom made camper on a 2010 Ford Transit 4x4 chassis. We are retired and winter in Canada is too cold.
Stefan
 

Redline

Likes to Drive and Ride
Hallmark

A friend and I recently returned from a monthlong trip to Northern Canada, including visiting the Arctic Ocean, Tuk, driving the iced road, etc. He had condensation issues in his FWC Hawk, wiping often (every day?), whereas I never did in my Hallmark. I never once had to wipe the walls or any other areas, very little condensation in my Hallmark popup.
 

sg1

Adventurer
I am not surprised. Hallmark has composite walls and roof without thermal bridges and insulated walls in their pop top.
Stefan
 

brokenhorn

Member
Hallmark

A friend and I recently returned from a monthlong trip to Northern Canada, including visiting the Arctic Ocean, Tuk, driving the iced road, etc. He had condensation issues in his FWC Hawk, wiping often (every day?), whereas I never did in my Hallmark. I never once had to wipe the walls or any other areas, very little condensation in my Hallmark popup.
Which hallmark do you have? Hardside or pop up?

Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
 

Wallygator

Adventurer
Wow, didn't realize the Hallmarks were so much money. For over double the price for comparable shell models with options between Hallmark and 4WC, I can probably put up with condensation. Are they really worth over double for a Hallmark??
 

Redline

Likes to Drive and Ride
Wow, didn't realize the Hallmarks were so much money. For over double the price for comparable shell models with options between Hallmark and 4WC, I can probably put up with condensation. Are they really worth over double for a Hallmark??
I have no idea regarding the price of the shell models, however I don't think the regular 'built'/optioned slide-in models are double the price of a similar FWC, but certainly more expensive.

Only you can decide if the lack of condensation and overall performance is worth it, money and value is a personal thing. However, I have been very happy with my Hallmark campers. Cold weather performance/insulation is very important to me.
 

NVLOC

Observer
Every single part of the construction is different to the FWC. No cold bridging, insulated composite panels, insulated soft walls, not sure about the windows but I would be surprised if hallmark offered only single pane. The FWC is an oven In the Summer and a condensation mess in anywhere from early Fall to mid Spring. Every single aluminum part of the FWC’s will sweat and bead droplets on the interior.
 
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