4 Cyl 5 Speed Tacoma: Has anybody regretted getting 265/75R16 tires?

grahamfitter

Expedition Leader
I'm going to get Duratracs for a 2015 4 cylinder 5 speed extended cab Tacoma. No mods except a cap on the back, I'm trying to keep it light.

I'd prefer 265/75R16 size to the stock 245/75R16 but I'm concerned about gearing. I'm currently in Colorado and the truck already needs third gear to make it up the long hills on I70, I don't want to make this substantially worse.

Does anybody have any practical experience here? Would I be better off sticking to the stock size?

Thanks in advance!
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
Can't say with a Tacoma, but my '91 came with 225/75R15 and it was slow. With 30x9.50 it was still slow but only marginally different. It can be a benefit because a few percent change means climbing in 3rd gear brings down the RPM a little. My guess is you probably won't notice really.
 

andrew61987

Observer
I just went from 245/75/16 to 235/85/16, which are the same diameter as 265/75 (32"). I have a 2008 4 cyl 5 spd access cab with a shell and some gear in the back all the time. Daily driver.

I was expecting some torque loss and I certainly did notice some. But it's still completely driveable and I would do it again, maybe even go to 255/85 (33"). The advantages on the trail are well worth it. If I didn't off road I would stay stock size.

I will say this: I take it easier on the freeway now with the larger tires. I used to travel 70-75 in 5th gear but with the larger tires the acceleration is not as responsive and more likely to require a downshift to pass, so I keep it down around 60-65 and I don't use 5th. This isn't required but I feel like the engine is happier that way and I'm never in a rush so I just chill out with the 18 wheelers, blast some tunes, and let everybody pass me. I'm going to burn through a few more tanks of gas like this, then go back to using 5th, and see if there's any MPG difference.

Eventually I'll get some 4.88 gears and it will be even more of a non issue.
 
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PirateMcGee

Expedition Leader
Unless there's an area you have been where you were truly limited by the .5" ground clearance and there was no possible way around then I would stick with the stock size. Less wear and tear, cheaper tires, no need to regear, no power loss etc. Bigger tires the vast majority of the time are un-needed especially on a truck with good ground clearance from the factory.

I went from 255/70r16's to a 265/75r16 on my Montero Sport with more hp, more torque, factory 4.90s, and the same curb weight as your truck and felt a significant difference. On my Sport it works well but on my old 22re truck and 4runner going stock to 31x10.50 made the truck quite sluggish and I never truly needed the clearance. Regretted it on the Yotas.

If you go 265 I would go with a light weight tire otherwise you get a double whammy of worse gear ratios and significant increase in rotational weight.
 

JBL13

New member
I have a 2002 standard cab with the 2.7, five-speed, factory 4.30 differential gearing and 265/75/16 KO2s (load range E). There's a definite decrease in street/highway performance with these tires, but it's worth it to me. I can still use fifth gear at highway speeds and a slight uphill grade. I do a lot of off-pavement driving, and the tire size works well for me there.

I would echo Pirate's suggestion to go with a lighter-grade 265 if you want to go with that size.
 

Owyhee H

Adventurer
I had a 2011 4banger that I tried 235/75R16 and didn't like the gearing change. It killed any ability for significant weight and headwinds were horrible. The stock size of 245/75r16 were very effective and I never had any issues with clearance.
 

WillBeck

Adventurer
It's noticeably slower, but I actually like the shift points better.

It struggles on hills, but I never expected it to be a speed demon. image.jpg
 

WillBeck

Adventurer
I have a 2002 standard cab with the 2.7, five-speed, factory 4.30 differential gearing and 265/75/16 KO2s (load range E). There's a definite decrease in street/highway performance with these tires, but it's worth it to me. I can still use fifth gear at highway speeds and a slight uphill grade. I do a lot of off-pavement driving, and the tire size works well for me there.

I would echo Pirate's suggestion to go with a lighter-grade 265 if you want to go with that size.
Were 4:30's an option? My 2000 has 4:10's. I thought only the 4Runner had the 4:30 option.
 

Attachments

Clutch

<---Pass
If you go 265 I would go with a light weight tire otherwise you get a double whammy of worse gear ratios and significant increase in rotational weight.
Seems like it is real hard to find the 265's in a C rated. I was going to upgrade to a 16" rim from my 15's since there are more thread pattern options, but ran into most of the 265's are E rated. So I stuck with the 15's and 32's. Which are tread options are getting fewer and fewer.

After running BFG, Goodyear, and Coopers for years and years, trying Kumho AT51's this go around.


I have been debating on whether or not to get a V6 or I4 for my next Tacoma...have been reading on Tacoma World, about towing and tire sizes and whatnot. Seems like it is more about the person's perception than anything else.
 
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p nut

butter
Seems like it is real hard to find the 265's in a C rated. I was going to upgrade to a 16" rim from my 15's since there are more thread pattern options, but ran into most of the 265's are E rated. So I stuck with the 15's and 32's. Which are tread options are getting fewer and fewer.

After running BFG, Goodyear, and Coopers for years and years, trying Kumho AT51's this go around.


I have been debating on whether or not to get a V6 or I4 for my next Tacoma...have been reading on Tacoma World, about towing and tire sizes and whatnot. Seems like it is more about the person's perception than anything else.
I don't think I've seen any decent tires in LR C in a while. All have moved to E. If LR C were desired, I'd switch out to 15" wheels/tires, personally. Cheaper, too.
_
For I4 vs V6, definitely go 6 if any towing is involved. Wasn't impressed with the I4 I drove, even towing a fairly light trailer (<2k lbs with cargo).
 

PirateMcGee

Expedition Leader
Seems like it is real hard to find the 265's in a C rated. I was going to upgrade to a 16" rim from my 15's since there are more thread pattern options, but ran into most of the 265's are E rated. So I stuck with the 15's and 32's. Which are tread options are getting fewer and fewer.

After running BFG, Goodyear, and Coopers for years and years, trying Kumho AT51's this go around.


I have been debating on whether or not to get a V6 or I4 for my next Tacoma...have been reading on Tacoma World, about towing and tire sizes and whatnot. Seems like it is more about the person's perception than anything else.
Yep. It sucks. I'll likely drop down to a 31x10.50r15 when it comes time to replace my tires for just that reason. That said, I've driven thousands of dirt miles on lots of passenger tires on everything from a car to full size truck without a single flat. First ever flat happened this year in MT in my dad's unloaded Tundra immediately after the road was graded and he had literally brand new 10 ply ATs. Just carry a spare, puncture kit, and compressor and run decent ATs. More than likely ti will be just hunky dory.
 

Clutch

<---Pass
Yep. It sucks. I'll likely drop down to a 31x10.50r15 when it comes time to replace my tires for just that reason. That said, I've driven thousands of dirt miles on lots of passenger tires on everything from a car to full size truck without a single flat. First ever flat happened this year in MT in my dad's unloaded Tundra immediately after the road was graded and he had literally brand new 10 ply ATs. Just carry a spare, puncture kit, and compressor and run decent ATs. More than likely ti will be just hunky dory.
I wonder why they are basically getting rid of a C rated tire? Never felt the need for an E rated on Toyota.

Have gotten only a few flats over the 34 years I have been driving, but they have been in town...picking up a screw or nail.
 

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Clutch

<---Pass
I don't think I've seen any decent tires in LR C in a while. All have moved to E. If LR C were desired, I'd switch out to 15" wheels/tires, personally. Cheaper, too.
_
For I4 vs V6, definitely go 6 if any towing is involved. Wasn't impressed with the I4 I drove, even towing a fairly light trailer (<2k lbs with cargo).
Pickin's are slim for 32X11.5X15. As far as AT's are concerned. BFG AT, Cooper AT3, Yokohama Geolanders, Kumho AT51...at least what I could find, might be more out there. Out of those 4, the BFG and the Kumho are severe weather rated. Always wanted to try the Yoko's...but they have gotten poor reviews. Wasn't too impressed with the snow performance of my old BFG AT's...the new version is supposed to be better. The Kumho's had great snow reviews...decided to give them a shot.


-----


I4 vs V6.

Wish I could rent one for week...so I can see for myself, can't really tell on a 10 minute dealer test drive. Did test drive the '16 V6...whoa...that is nice! It is also $7-8K more than what I want to spend.

I don't tow over 2000#, wondering if I get the 4 banger regeared to 4:56...if that it would help.
 

p nut

butter
Pickin's are slim for 32X11.5X15. As far as AT's are concerned. BFG AT, Cooper AT3, Yokohama Geolanders, Kumho AT51...at least what I could find, might be more out there. Out of those 4, the BFG and the Kumho are severe weather rated. Always wanted to try the Yoko's...but they have gotten poor reviews. Wasn't too impressed with the snow performance of my old BFG AT's...the new version is supposed to be better. The Kumho's had great snow reviews...decided to give them a shot.


-----


I4 vs V6.

Wish I could rent one for week...so I can see for myself, can't really tell on a 10 minute dealer test drive. Did test drive the '16 V6...whoa...that is nice! It is also $7-8K more than what I want to spend.

I don't tow over 2000#, wondering if I get the 4 banger regeared to 4:56...if that it would help.
BFG KO2's take care of my needs so I'd be set even if that were the only tire available. Honestly, though, I could probably even do with 31" tires as well.
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Rentals: Have you tried dealers?

http://www.toyota.com/rental/tacoma.html
 
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