3 Years Around North America, Plus a Few More

Arjan

Fossil Overlander
Good write up - thanks.

You mention "..turnbuckle system that is inside the truck bed and camper. We have had no problems with the camper moving on the bed and the lack of external ties and turnbuckles gives a clean look to the rig. ...." Could you plell me some more on this, please ? Sounds interesting for a trailer project I have coming up.
 

Umnak

Adventurer
Good write up - thanks.

You mention "..turnbuckle system that is inside the truck bed and camper. We have had no problems with the camper moving on the bed and the lack of external ties and turnbuckles gives a clean look to the rig. ...." Could you plell me some more on this, please ? Sounds interesting for a trailer project I have coming up.
I've attached two images that show the access port for installing/adjusting the turnbuckles and one of the four that hold the camper to the truck bed. The plates above the access port hold the chain. There are similar sized plates installed under the bed of the truck. Very simple and effective, at least for this light of weight. They haven't budged or loosened since installed. Turnbuckle access port..jpegTurnbuckle with chain.jpg
 

Arjan

Fossil Overlander
Thank you very much !
Sorry for the question - but English is not my native language.
Like you say, a simple but very effective method of securing the unit.
"Mini Twist Locks" are often used here.

Please keep the posting coming - love the read !
 

Umnak

Adventurer
Something Different

The party isn't over, but there is a break in the music.

Eve has decided to take a short term job after 18 months of traveling and settling into our new home. We're going to take a few months off from using the camper, so I removed it from the truck.

I put out a request for a mentor as this was my first attempt at removing and storing the Capri. A retired Coast Guard couple who live near by offered to help. They have a 4Wheel Camper on a Tacoma, and have had a few other (larger) truck campers in the past. Both women were very knowledge and helpful. My neighbor heard about this and asked if he could come along as an observer. The neighbor is a mechanical engineer, so he was figuring out how to reverse the process so he could help with the installation in February or March. We live in a good place.
Cabin at Rest.jpeg

It was pretty easy undo the turnbuckles and start the hand cranking part on the jacks. I used a drill with an attachment that allowed me to lower the jacks fast while the camper was still on the truck. I had the base of the four jacks touching the ground when we went to manual.
I brought two 4”x4”x5’ pressured treated pieces of lumber upon which to place the camper, but at the suggestion of the mentors held off on lowering it all the way. Instead, I used some cinder blocks on their side to support the lumber off the ground.

The truck drives smoother without the camper, and the mileage is better. However, Eve says the difference isn’t that noticeable as a passenger. For me, it is most noticeable in city driving. I’m not sure if I could articulate the difference on a level highway.

So, we are not using the camper, but we have decided to take some trips locally and dig a little deeper into the region.

My first local trip included 3 Washington State Ferries.

3 Ferries and a Floating Bridge.png
The image above shows the route, which essentially starts within a few miles of our house, takes us to Whidby Island then south and over to the mainland at Mukilteo.

Boarding in Port Townsend Waiting - MV Salish.jpeg

No Skating in Clinton.jpegBoarding in Clinton - MV Suquamish .jpegLeaving Clinton.jpeg
From there, its all city driving to Edmonds’ waterfront and the ferry back across Puget Sound to Kingston. I took the back roads to Port Gambell then over the Hood Canal Floating Bridge and back on to the Olympic Peninsula.

Boarding in Edmonds - MV Walla Walla.jpegCar Deck on the Wala Wala.jpeg

It’s about 75 miles of road and took me just under 6 hours, stopping for coffee in Freeland on Whidby. It was an interesting ride and one I’d rather do on a motorcycle or even a bicycle, though in high summer for the light.

Arriving Kingston.jpegHood Canal FLoating Bridge.jpeg
BTW, the Hood Canal bridge at just about a mile long is the longest floating bridge in the world located in a tidal basin, and the third longest floating bridge overall.
 

Arjan

Fossil Overlander
Good read - any pics of the truck now "naturel" ?

Pity I can't have here in France a good US diesel Pick Up....

Thanks for the write up !
 

Umnak

Adventurer
Gearing up for a 6 week trip to Death Valley and the Mojave.

We plan on doing part of the Mojave Trail and I would appreciate input as to which part; east of the Kelso-Cimo road or west. We've stayed in the Hole in the Wall and Mid Hills Campgrounds, and will probably spend some time there during the trip.

Also looking at the Saline Valley Hot Springs for the return trip. Again, would appreciate input on the south or west road for a lone traveler.
 

Umnak

Adventurer
Half-way through the trip and finally in wifi. We drove 101 from Port Townsend to Sonoma, then headed to Bakersfield for a restock on food. Spent 13 nights in the Mojave and are now at Tecopa Hot Springs on the edge of Death Valley.
Some moments from the last few weeks.
Oregon Coast
Gold Cliff Redwoods
Gold Cliff Trail
Us
Afton Canyon, Mojave
Cabin-on-the Road (Capri Camper and GMC Z71 All Terrain)
Lava Tubes, Mojave
Hole-In-The- Wall Trail, Mojave
Banchee Canyon, Mojave
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508149508150508151508155
 

duluth

New member
Now that you have had some time in both vehicles which do you prefer overall? Thanks for the great write up
 

Arjan

Fossil Overlander
Interesting to hear your views on both type of travelling & vehicles..

I'm in the process of either keeping the Land Rover 110 - basically camping inside a hard sides tent - or changing to a 4WD van - like the Iveco 40 10 - with standing height, a bed and a place to sit normally.

To me, it seems that it is almost like to different ways of traveling ?
 

Umnak

Adventurer
Now that you have had some time in both vehicles which do you prefer overall? Thanks for the great write up
We were talking about this over the past few days during a short trip to the west coast of the Olympic Park. We both enjoyed the Sportsmobile Sprinter for overall comfort, the convenience of being able to walk through to the cabin, and mileage (25 mpg). However, the Capri Retreat wins on flexibility -- both literal and figurative, rough road use, and oddly enough, use of space. The month long trip to the Mojave in the Capri was really comfortable and we were able to go places the Sprinter couldn't have ventured.
All that being said, I'd probably look hard at a used walk through 4x4 like a Chinook or Tiger if we get itchy feet again and do a longer trip.
 
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Umnak

Adventurer
Interesting to hear your views on both type of travelling & vehicles..

I'm in the process of either keeping the Land Rover 110 - basically camping inside a hard sides tent - or changing to a 4WD van - like the Iveco 40 10 - with standing height, a bed and a place to sit normally.

To me, it seems that it is almost like to different ways of traveling ?

I agree. We have a 4Runner that we used in Alaska for a trip along the Dempster Highway. It was great with a tarp and a minimalist approach to camping. The Sprinter, or any 4wd van, would allow far more room, less moving stuff in and out of the truck and better protection from weather and animals.

511134
 

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