275/65r-18 BFG KO2 on LR3?

gatorgrizz27

Active member
Hey all,

I picked up an 08 LR3 SE last week and it needs some real tires. Been reading everything I can find, and I know most recommend the 265/65r-18’s, but the 275’s look so much more proportional to me.

I know I’ll need to move the driver wheel well sensor wire, relocate the rear heater lines, trim the front frame horns, rear body seams, and other various parts inside the wheel wells. I’m planning to run a ~ 1” lift with the IID tool, and am aware that the lift doesn’t affect anything at full compression.

My two primary concerns are if I’ll be able to get that size spare in the stock location fully deflated and with the heat shield removed, and if an EAS fault that drops the truck to the bump stops will keep it from being able to move. Do the tires actually bottom out inside the top of the wheel wells, or just end up rubbing on various points inside the lower edges?

There appear to be long enough threads on all the air struts to make up some 3/8” steel plate spacers, similar to the way the proud rhino kit works, but I’m not sure it’s worth the effort.
 

LKLK

Member
Go with the proud rhino lift with spacers. It will solve all your concerns. you can drive on the 275 with normal suspension, but the tires will eat your plastic wheel wells. I have heard people fitting a deflated 275 in the spare, you should be fine. hope this helps. good luck
 

TOUGE

Active member
I have 275/65 Ko2s, the rear rubs at full compression no matter how much "lift" you put into Gaptool as you need the proud rhino kit or longer bump stops to do that. Mine has light rubbing in the rear, nothing worth heating/cutting up the lining. Front doesn't rub at all. Other people have had different results.

My spare fitted with heat shield, tyre deflated and using soap to help it get up there.
 

LKLK

Member
I have 275/65 Ko2s, the rear rubs at full compression no matter how much "lift" you put into Gaptool as you need the proud rhino kit or longer bump stops to do that. Mine has light rubbing in the rear, nothing worth heating/cutting up the lining. Front doesn't rub at all. Other people have had different results.

My spare fitted with heat shield, tyre deflated and using soap to help it get up there.
I like the soap trick! I have to figure out how to get mine in with the stock hitch mounted. I know its easier without. But i like thinking about this challenge.
 

DiscoNels

Adventurer
I've run two sets of 275/65/18's on my 2006 LR3 - Goodyear Wrangler MT/R, and currently Cooper STT Pro. Both with no problems. I am using 30mm wheel spacers. I did not relocate coolant lines in RR wheel well, but I did use a heat gun on the plastic wheel liner to reshape a bit to give more room. I have a Tactical 4x4 front and rear bumper which may give me a little more wiggle room. I can drive at normal height, even lowered at access mode (and lower with my LLAMS controller) to get into garage and turn into a parking spot without rubbing. I do get a little rubbing in reverse in FR corner. When my Coopers were brand new they liked to tear my rear wheel arches off while off roading, or on the street if I hit a bump in a hard corner (at normal height). I haven't lost an arch in over a year now.
 
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Lemagus

New member
I've run two sets of 275/65/18's on my 2006 LR3 - Goodyear Wrangler MT/R, and currently Cooper STT Pro. Both with no problems. I am using 50mm wheel spacers.
Those are pretty beefy spacers. Did you go 50mm for the look or necessary for other reasons?
 

gatorgrizz27

Active member
Thanks for the replies, going to do a bit more research before I order tires. I’m not really interested in the Proud Rhino kit due to the drawbacks, it seems great for guys interested in running 33” tires and larger.

This is my 6th Rover, but first without a solid axle. Kind of frustrating that the older ones were limited on tire size due to lacking power, and the newer ones have a bunch of other limiting factors. I know they don’t need larger tires, but the 265/65r18’s most run are common factory sizes on a lot of SUV’s these days.
 

Ray_G

Explorer
I'm running that size KO2 on mine...but she's coiled. :) I don't notice rubbing, if it happens it isn't significant. It is a good looking tire size for the truck, but I'm biased in that realm of course.
r-
Ray
 

DiscoNels

Adventurer
Those are pretty beefy spacers. Did you go 50mm for the look or necessary for other reasons?
My mistake, they're not 50mm spacers, they are 30mm (1.25").
When you lift these vehicles the track width gets pretty narrow so, 30mm to give it a better stance (I don't like tippy), and the look is better too.
 
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Lemagus

New member
My mistake, they're not 50mm spacers, they are 30mm (1.25").
When you lift these vehicles the track width gets pretty narrow so, 30mm to give it a better stance (I don't like tippy), and the look is better too.
Gotcha. Makes more sense. i have the 30mm with the LR3 18" wheels and 265/65s on my LR4. Some rubbing of the frame horns at full lock.
 

TOUGE

Active member
I like the soap trick! I have to figure out how to get mine in with the stock hitch mounted. I know its easier without. But i like thinking about this challenge.
I use the long stock hitch with a Yakima bike rack and it doesn't touch the spare tyre at all.
 

gatorgrizz27

Active member
Thanks for the replies, I really wish it were possible to try both sizes back to back. Obviously the 275’s will take more hp to turn, reduce braking, wander more on the road, etc, but I’m wondering if it’s actually noticeable from behind the wheel or not.

At this point, I’m leaning towards the 265’s more from a standpoint of being able to drive on the bumpstops even though I just ordered the IID tool, and one I hadn’t considered until yesterday is that the 265’s are a much more common size and therefore more likely to be in stock if I need replacement on a trip. I might call around to a few tire stores and see if this holds true or not.
 

LKLK

Member
Thanks for the replies, I really wish it were possible to try both sizes back to back. Obviously the 275’s will take more hp to turn, reduce braking, wander more on the road, etc, but I’m wondering if it’s actually noticeable from behind the wheel or not.

At this point, I’m leaning towards the 265’s more from a standpoint of being able to drive on the bumpstops even though I just ordered the IID tool, and one I hadn’t considered until yesterday is that the 265’s are a much more common size and therefore more likely to be in stock if I need replacement on a trip. I might call around to a few tire stores and see if this holds true or not.
If you’re in socal, id say let’s go for a drive, i have 275/65r18 on my rig.
 

Blaise

Well-known member
Sorry but - why? The 265/65 is almost identical. Except now you gotta worry about rubbing and/or being stuck if you have an EAS failure.

Just do the 265/65. See below... the 'look' is just fine. And please don't buy lift rods or spacers, the engineers at Land Rover are real smart, you're not upgrading the truck by running it at the wrong height.
 

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