2022 Ford F-150 Lightning Electric Truck

jbaucom

Well-known member
For the sake of comparing prices to the competition, the Rivian R1T, which is an in-between size - larger than a mid-size but smaller than a full-size, starts at $67,500. A Tesla Cybertruck dual-motor AWD starts at $49,900 (subject to change since Tesla's delivery date and actual product availability are prone to delays). In 2024, the Hummer EV2 will finally be available starting at $79,995.

The absolute cheapest starting price for an electric truck is the Cybertruck RWD, starting at $39,900.
 

SDDiver5

Expedition Leader
Ford has been killing it with their vehicle lineup and their trucks are top notch. Like others have said, the cost is about what I expected, the range kinda sucks but the thing that really got me is that it doesn't look like some lame electric vehicle. This looks like an F150. I think they are going to sell like hot cakes. Other than the Rivian, which I like more than the lightning, there is nothing out there that looks cool and is practical.

Ram is pretty late to the game with the EV, GM is spending billions on making killer batteries, getting ramped up with EV and I assume they will have an electric truck lineup in the next few years that should be pretty nice and will replace their current horrid truck lineup.

I'm excited to see where Toyota trucks go with this trend and to see what the Tesla truck actually looks like. I'm certain mastermind Elon will make something excellent.

Pretty exciting times if you ask me.
 

Todd n Natalie

Observer
I forgot that you're in Canada, which explains the pricing discrepancy. Here, a F150 XLT crew cab 4x4 with the base 300A package starts at $43,805 + destination with the 3.3 V6. With the 2.7 TT V6, the base price is $45,000, with the 5.0 V8 it starts at $45,800, and with the 3.5 TT V6 it's $46,400. The Powerboost hybrid drivetrain in that truck starts at $48,300. Considering the $7500 US federal tax credit brings the starting price of an XLT Lightning to $45,474, I'd call it aggressive pricing.
The pricing is def closer to a gas powered truck in the US. Also, no tax credit here in Alberta. I wonder if the Lightning will qualify for Employee pricing when it comes out. That's usually another 10K off sticker. (If with the chip shortages we actually see employee pricing in 21/22)
 

raggedphoto

Member
I think it makes sense for people who use it as an in-town work truck. Your plumber could drive around with it all day long from service call to service call, plug it in at night, and never buy a drop of gasoline.
I believe fleet applications are the intended market with the family grocery getters coming in a close second as you mentioned. It blows me away that the F150 is the number one selling car in the US followed by the Silverado and Ram. That many people do not need a full size pickup, honestly your average joe would do better with a small SUV and trailer for their yearly mulch run. Regardless I am really excited for the EV market to start including more 4x4 options and honestly car prices have gotten so high that $50-$70K for a full EV truck seems on-par to me.
 
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Deleted member 9101

Guest
I am glad to see Ford build this, it will spur other manufacturers to bring similar EV trucks to market for the every day user, I am waiting to see Toyota's EV trucks, I don't trust Ford to have the reliability and battery longevity up to par on this just yet, but I do like that they are kicking the market in gear. Is there any mention on the battery warranty, expected life span or replacement cost yet? I would assume if it was noteworthy they would have mentioned it. Do they match other EV battery warranty's?

My wifes Fusion Hybrid has been rock solid and the battery has a 8 year 100k warranty.

Fords Hybrids have all been very reliable with many of then hitting 250-300k with zero issues.
 
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Deleted member 9101

Guest
I believe fleet applications are the intended market with the family grocery getters coming in a close second as you mentioned. It blows me away that the F150 is the number one selling car in the US followed by the Silverado and Ram. That many people do not need a full size pickup, honestly your average joe would do better with a small SUV and trailer for their yearly mulch run. Regardless I am really excited for the EV market to start including more 4x4 options and honestly car prices have gotten so high that $50-$70K for a full EV truck seems on-par to me.

I looked into the "small SUV and a trailer" concept and quickly found how flawed it was...lol. The small SUV doesn't get much better fuel economy than a truck, interior space is a joke, cargo room is also a joke, they don't have a very good tow rating, and to top it off they can easily cost as much or more than a truck.

Then there is the trailer, I have to buy it, register it, maintain and repair it, plus I have to store it. So in my case I'm either losing a space in the garage or paying to store it.

Even if I bought the small SUV and used a uHaul trailer I'm still left with a vehicle that has a limited towing capacity, almost no cargo room and tiny interior.

In contrast my F150 has a massive interior, plenty of room for luggage/groceries/mulch, I can tow thousands of pounds more than a small SUV( I can pull a trailer with a small SUV on it) and I can rent a larger trailer when I need to haul a couple of yards of gravel or mulch.

No matter how I tried to spin things around...a small SUV never ended up more pratical or significantly cheaper than my truck. YMMV
 
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Deleted member 9101

Guest
I forgot that you're in Canada, which explains the pricing discrepancy. Here, a F150 XLT crew cab 4x4 with the base 300A package starts at $43,805 + destination with the 3.3 V6. With the 2.7 TT V6, the base price is $45,000, with the 5.0 V8 it starts at $45,800, and with the 3.5 TT V6 it's $46,400. The Powerboost hybrid drivetrain in that truck starts at $48,300. Considering the $7500 US federal tax credit brings the starting price of an XLT Lightning to $45,474, I'd call it aggressive pricing.

That's assuming they sell for full sticker. Once they are on the market for a year or two they will probably get the same incentives as every other F150.
 

jbaucom

Well-known member
Car and Driver posted an article listing some of the standard features included on each trim level. Just for fun, I configured a gas F150 XLT that included the features that C&D said were standard on the Lightning XLT. The build required the 301A package on a gas truck due to the standard power tailgate & LED bed lighting on the Lightning, and I added a midlevel engine (5.0) to ensure the payload and performance was reasonably as close to what's claimed for the Lightning as possible. Other options that I included to match features that are supposed to be standard on the Lightning XLT are: skid plates, 18" wheels, and 2 kw Pro Power onboard. The total MSRP of this truck was $48,270.

The comparison isn't perfectly apples to apples, because each truck has different strengths and weaknesses. I could have added the 2.4 kw pro power onboard that the Lightning has standard, but would have had to upgrade to the Powerboost Hybrid for an additional $2500. The Lightning has a frunk, while the 5.0 V8 can travel farther without stopping for fuel, and can be refueled to 100% quicker than the Lightning.

 

Wose

New member
I believe fleet applications are the intended market with the family grocery getters coming in a close second as you mentioned. It blows me away that the F150 is the number one selling car in the US followed by the Silverado and Ram. That many people do not need a full size pickup, honestly your average joe would do better with a small SUV and trailer for their yearly mulch run. Regardless I am really excited for the EV market to start including more 4x4 options and honestly car prices have gotten so high that $50-$70K for a full EV truck seems on-par to me.
Since I live in rural SW Washington, but regularly deal with people who live in Portland, I hear that a lot.

The truth is, it depends on where that Average Joe lives. I do see lots of urban/suburban families tooling around in full-size trucks that probably really don't need them.

However, in large parts of the country, there are people who really DO need a full-size truck. Granted, some of them are driving 3/4 tons when they could probably get by with a half-ton, but my left eye starts twitching every time this topic comes up. I mean I COULD drag my recycling bin and two trash cans the 1/4 mile from my house to the road manually, but I'd rather not. Likewise, I could carry a cord of fire wood in about 10 trips in a mid-size crossover, but at some point this gets ridiculous.

And that's before we start talking about the fact that of my 4 wildfire evacuation routes, only one of them is a paved, hard ball road. The alternate route is do-able at slow speed in a CUV. The contingency route will likely damage the CUV, and I have concerns about my F150 making it over the emergency route. So for lots of rural Average Joes, it's not just an affectation.

I think that's the beauty of what Ford is doing. There's an F150 for all comers right now. I think many urban/suburban tradesman and families will jump on the Lightning like a dog on a chicken leg.

Because of my Leftneck leanings, I'd love to have an all-electric truck, but they're just not there yet. When I trade in my 2017 in 7 or 8 years, we'll assess the market, but I'm guessing the right vehicle for me will be the hybrid F150.
 

raggedphoto

Member
No matter how I tried to spin things around...a small SUV never ended up more pratical or significantly cheaper than my truck. YMMV
Fair enough, I should've mentioned my current location has me surrounded by McMansions and the F150s around here probably never see more than a random dump/home depot run once a year so I am a bit biased. I grew up in rural Colorado and made good use of a full size truck out there but here in suburbia they make little sense to me.

Since I live in rural SW Washington, but regularly deal with people who live in Portland, I hear that a lot.

Because of my Leftneck leanings,
Bingo, see my reply above. Leftneck is a new one on me, that would certainly describe a lot of the folks in my hometown, I like it.
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
Since I live in rural SW Washington, but regularly deal with people who live in Portland, I hear that a lot.

The truth is, it depends on where that Average Joe lives. I do see lots of urban/suburban families tooling around in full-size trucks that probably really don't need them.

However, in large parts of the country, there are people who really DO need a full-size truck. Granted, some of them are driving 3/4 tons when they could probably get by with a half-ton, but my left eye starts twitching every time this topic comes up. I mean I COULD drag my recycling bin and two trash cans the 1/4 mile from my house to the road manually, but I'd rather not. Likewise, I could carry a cord of fire wood in about 10 trips in a mid-size crossover, but at some point this gets ridiculous.
I could get by with my little Ranger... except for those times I could almost use a 3/4 ton.

Enter my F-150.
 

Wose

New member
I could get by with my little Ranger... except for those times I could almost use a 3/4 ton.

Enter my F-150.
It is kind of a Goldilocks size, isn't it? I mean I could get the WHOLE cord of wood in a 3/4 ton, but that's only something that's A Thing a few days a year.

We considered a Ranger, but I'm 6'2" and for 500 mile road trips with the family and dog, I'm glad to have the cabin space. I quit considering it when I realized the newer F150s have gas mileage real close to a Ranger. If I could afford a quiver of vehicles, I'd trick out a Ranger as a more off-road centric vehicle for getting around on the tight logging roads around here.
 
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Deleted member 9101

Guest
A hybrid makes far more sense for anyone who takes long road trips. Having to stop every 200 miles to spend 30+ minutes to recharge -- no thanks!
Unfortunately, Ford built the "Power Boost" not a conventional hybrid. It's more focused on providing extra power than increasing fuel economy.
 

jaxyaks

Adventurer
If Toyota builds a EV tacoma that gets 350-400 mile range and is crew cab 4x4 with comparable towing and payload and is within 10K of the one I have now...I will trade mine for it this afternoon.

I think we will see this in the next few years, Toyota said they will introduce 15 battery powered vehicles by 2025. I think your going to see a Hybrid Tundra real soon, a Hybrid Tacoma when the generation changes in 4-5 years and possibly a hybrid and EV Tacoma at that time. Toyota knows how to build EV's, I mean they kind of paved the way for Tesla and I feel like they are letting everyone else seed the market for them.
 
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