2020 Overland Explorer Vehicles (OEV) CAMP-X pop-up slide-in pickup camper

PaulPritchard

ArizonaPaul
The water tank is 15" wide by 15" deep by 22" long. It has an irregular shape where one side extends to 24" long. I will try to get a picture to send.
 

PaulPritchard

ArizonaPaul
IMG_0396.jpeg
This is the back of the water tank looking to the rear of the camper. Hard to get a good picture but it shows the shape change. The dimensions are 15" wide by 15" deep by 22" long (short side) and 24" long on the longer side.

Let me know if you want addition information.
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
Makes sense. So, of the extra length was for about 1/2 the tank, that would be (7.5 x 15 x 22) + (7.5 x 15 x 24) = 2,475 + 2,700 = 5,175 cu inches. divided by 231 (cu volume of a US gallon) = 22.4 gallons. Seems about right calling that 20 gallons usable.

I just measured my CAMPX tank and it's 24L x 12W x 16T = 4,608 cu inches which is 19.94 gallons. Call it 18 gallons usable. There are a couple 2" x 2" molding indents on the visible side. Not sure about the non-visible side. but even two of those would be less than 1/2 gallon. I somehow had it in my head that my year CAMP-X was 10 gallon vs 20 gallon but measurements indicate it's about 20 gallons.
 
Last edited:

stevo_pct

Active member
How thick are the walls of the water tank? You're using outer dimensions above. So it will be less than the estimates above, but probably not by too much.
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
They look to be about 1/4" thick walls. Correct in that my dimensions were outside. I tried to account for both wall thickness and leaving an air gap at top of tank when I called the calculated 19.94 gallons 18 usable. For fun, if I reduce each outside dimension by 1/2", that still comes out to 18.13 gallons. The goofy part is I went back and looked at my own posts in this thread and found only a single reference to water tank size and that was when mentioned the water tank orientation changed between 2019 and 2020 and in that single line, I reference a 20 gallon water tank. Not sure at what point I recently got 10 gallon stuck in my head. Embarrassing. Ha. I'll update my above posts referring to 10 gallons as to not confuse future readers.

In any case, fun to calculate the new tank vs the old as it appears there are a couple extra gallon of capacity/leeway in the new.
 
Last edited:

pk22

New member
Well Aug 30th I finally got to Red Deer, Alberta where the Camp X is made and picked ours up. I’m living and traveling in it full time so its been a learning process of what to use for storage etc. I removed the rear seats in the truck to “increase” the payload (mine is 1700lbs) and to make a “bike garage” . Hope to see some of you out there….1FB9EF28-4BB2-4BE1-B52D-E473F23211BC.jpegF61BBAB6-7F1E-49C3-A538-20ADF3B45B82.jpeg907DBF23-C6C6-4713-814A-5CF3DFB51268.jpeg
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
Congrats! We love our North of the Border trips. This year's trip was delayed, but hopeful things will normalize a bit next summer. Meanwhile, no shortage of trips around our local mountain ranges.
Thanks for posting some pics. Would love to see others post some pictures out and about with their rigs. Guess I could do the same, though most of ours are just in the timber so not quite the same caliber as the above. Ha.
 

PaulPritchard

ArizonaPaul
Congratulations on your new camper pk22. We're looking to get up to Canada next year and see Alberta and British Columbia (Vancouver Island).
 

pk22

New member
Well I camped last night in my first sub zero temps (-3C) and had some beautiful snow to awake to! I’ve got some condensation all around the caulking line at the roof top which I’m sure is normal as yet I have wetness under my bed so I think I’m going to have to experiment with the heat/fans/ and proper amount of windows open to correct this. It’s just w the heater running all night Im not wanting too much open to loose the heat (so as not to freeze the water line, I have the truma hot water drained and shut off). Anyone found the perfect balance? This is a learning process for sure in terms of what works and doesn’t.
ps Chad the photos in timbers can be just as pretty as any :2C97F42F-419D-42DA-9A25-BF7E9EDC3402.jpeg
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
We just arrived home from 3 days/2 nights out. Once again put the turnbuckles to the test on day 2 and first part of day 3. Within our 3 day/758 mile trip, we did about 80 miles of forest service road including 3/4 mile up a spur we had no business going up. Ha. I managed to not rip the mud flaps off (they flexed/folded rather than ripping off) and only touched frame one time. It was about 35 minutes up in 4x4 low range 1st gear and 25 minutes down. We were on a similar section of road two weekends ago but that was was a flat shelf road rather than a climb. We were in 4x4 low for about 3 hours that day. Needless to say I appreciate that OEV specs their dealers install their brackets using stock bed/frame bolts and other brackets are tied to the frame. Previous brand camper was installed with eye bolts just through the pickup bed sheetmetal with large washers behind and not sure it would have held up to all the overlanding/4x4ing we are doing nowadays.

This morning, we woke up to 29F. Also our first below freezing night this year. Regarding condensation and venting. We sleep with the heater set to 58F. Used to set it to 52F, but maybe we are getting soft. Plus this camper is so much better insulated than our previous that we use less propane running it at a warmer temp. Usually we do crack open the vent over the bed. Sometimes we also keep the dinette window cracked open, but that is usually when temps are above freezing. No matter the temp, we crack open that window and crank on the heat in the morning to circulate some air through. Our CAMP-X is when they were only putting the insulating foam on the lower extrusion; not on the upper 1" of exposed extrusion along the roof. That 1" line is the only are we get condensation. Since the newer ones have that 1" strip foamed, I assume that is nearly eliminated. If you are getting a bit along the caulked edge of that seam, I wonder if it would make sense for that foam to be 2" rather than 1" wide and extend out onto the gel coat of the ceiling panel. The same could probably happen on the lower extrusion if one really wanted to be ready for winter camping. For us, we don't do that much below freezing camping, so I've not yet even bothered to add the foam strip to our top extrusion as the condensation usually dries before we drop the top (as mentioned, we vent in the morning and run the heater in the morning). Occasionally I go around that uninsulated extrusion with a dry washcloth but until it is below freezing, it hasn't warranted it. Will mention again that we are in dry Montana so cold wet area would experience more condensation.

On this trip, we were well above freezing each day and just tickled freezing at night, but I choose to err on the side of caution and drain the water heater each night. I use a container to catch the water that drains out of it (maybe a liter or so) and dump that into our portable toilet to use for flushing. Nothing wasted that way.

PK,
Can you confirm/edit the wording of your sentence regarding moisture under the bed? Was that to say you "haven't" experience moisture under the bed or "have"? I would be surprised if there was and so just wanted to confirm if that was a typo. Also curious the story on your modded CAMP-X overcab decal mod. Are "C and P" initials? Or some other fun story/meaning?
 

pk22

New member
hey
We just arrived home from 3 days/2 nights out. Once again put the turnbuckles to the test on day 2 and first part of day 3. Within our 3 day/758 mile trip, we did about 80 miles of forest service road including 3/4 mile up a spur we had no business going up. Ha. I managed to not rip the mud flaps off (they flexed/folded rather than ripping off) and only touched frame one time. It was about 35 minutes up in 4x4 low range 1st gear and 25 minutes down. We were on a similar section of road two weekends ago but that was was a flat shelf road rather than a climb. We were in 4x4 low for about 3 hours that day. Needless to say I appreciate that OEV specs their dealers install their brackets using stock bed/frame bolts and other brackets are tied to the frame. Previous brand camper was installed with eye bolts just through the pickup bed sheetmetal with large washers behind and not sure it would have held up to all the overlanding/4x4ing we are doing nowadays.

This morning, we woke up to 29F. Also our first below freezing night this year. Regarding condensation and venting. We sleep with the heater set to 58F. Used to set it to 52F, but maybe we are getting soft. Plus this camper is so much better insulated than our previous that we use less propane running it at a warmer temp. Usually we do crack open the vent over the bed. Sometimes we also keep the dinette window cracked open, but that is usually when temps are above freezing. No matter the temp, we crack open that window and crank on the heat in the morning to circulate some air through. Our CAMP-X is when they were only putting the insulating foam on the lower extrusion; not on the upper 1" of exposed extrusion along the roof. That 1" line is the only are we get condensation. Since the newer ones have that 1" strip foamed, I assume that is nearly eliminated. If you are getting a bit along the caulked edge of that seam, I wonder if it would make sense for that foam to be 2" rather than 1" wide and extend out onto the gel coat of the ceiling panel. The same could probably happen on the lower extrusion if one really wanted to be ready for winter camping. For us, we don't do that much below freezing camping, so I've not yet even bothered to add the foam strip to our top extrusion as the condensation usually dries before we drop the top (as mentioned, we vent in the morning and run the heater in the morning). Occasionally I go around that uninsulated extrusion with a dry washcloth but until it is below freezing, it hasn't warranted it. Will mention again that we are in dry Montana so cold wet area would experience more condensation.

On this trip, we were well above freezing each day and just tickled freezing at night, but I choose to err on the side of caution and drain the water heater each night. I use a container to catch the water that drains out of it (maybe a liter or so) and dump that into our portable toilet to use for flushing. Nothing wasted that way.

PK,
Can you confirm/edit the wording of your sentence regarding moisture under the bed? Was that to say you "haven't" experience moisture under the bed or "have"? I would be surprised if there was and so just wanted to confirm if that was a typo. Also curious the story on your modded CAMP-X overcab decal mod. Are "C and P" initials? Or some other fun story/meaning?
Hey Chad,

great write up as always. Yes I HAVE had wetness under my bed even when not below freezing I’ve noticed lately. And I get that ring of condensation around the roof silicone and aluminum brackets (for roof lifts) anytime the temp is cooler say below 10C (what’s that about 50F)
But I have been cracking a window and running a fan and the heat all day the past 3 days (only one night below freezing) and I’ve gotten rid of the condensation around the roof and lessened it under the bed but still a small amount.

PS I agree w you, I prefer the look of the older models’ flooring
 

ripperj

Explorer
I added the Froli to my Northstar. It’s definitely an improvement in comfort, and under mattress dampness. My camper happens to have a 45 degree taper nose, so the whole front of the mattress is exposed, also there is a 18” wide place at the foot of the bed that is open- point being the Froli springs can get air under the mattress. ( you can see under the whole mattress.
If the Camp X mattress is tight to the sides, I don’t know if the Froli will help with the condensation???

I ended up add the Froli and a 2” topper- with the Froli Star and the topper I lost about 3.5” of headroom- I definitely miss it :)
Sorry for the de-rail


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

PaulPritchard

ArizonaPaul
We camped in Wyoming with around 32F overnight temps and ran the heater at 60F (we're old) and kept very comfortable. My wife noticed a little condensation on the roll-up window covering in the morning, We didn't even think to check underneath the mattress and we didn't do a close inspection anywhere else. We didn't open any vents or windows overnight. Next time I will be more vigilant in checking around the Camp-X for condensation.
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
We did an April trip to Escalante/Grand Staircase/Bryce/Kodachrome which I shared a few images of earlier in this thread. Here are some more images from a portion of our early to mid summer trips. We are lucky enough to have 8 different mountain ranges within a 3 hour radius (2 of the 8 are 15 minute drive).


Mid-June scouting trip for a future ATV or electric motorcycle trip.
20210611.jpg


Early July electric motorcycle trip to a different mountain range.
20210702_1.jpg
20210702_2.jpg


Late July ATV trip to the location in the first image. Usual vegetation contrast between June and August and wildfire season had started and so too did the haze.
20210723.jpg

Early August overlanding trip. Very smoky (wildfire season) but the late evening color sure is pretty. Ha. Ash was falling when I went outside after dark. Had on an LED headlight and looked up and it was like the spaceship movies flying through the stars. Ash made a mess on the hood combined with morning dew.
20210807.jpg

Wind direction change cleared out the smoke smell by the next morning. Rest of the day was spent overlanding out a different route out of this mountain range than we had entered.
20210808.jpg

Late-August electric motorcycle trip.
20210828.jpg
 
Last edited:

Forum statistics

Threads
178,266
Messages
2,781,290
Members
213,031
Latest member
GlassHalfFull
Top