2020 Overland Explorer Vehicles (OEV) CAMP-X pop-up slide-in pickup camper

joepittsburgh

New member
Thanks all for contributions to this thread. It has been very helpful as we get ready to pull the trigger on a Camp-X. Other than the changes to the propane bottles, what is any difference is there between the 2019 and 2020 models? Thanks….joe
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
Hi Joe,
I covered some of the changes between the 2019 and 2020 model (2020 is what I have). I have a hunch you may be asking the differences between the 2020 and the current campers (2021 and soon to be 2022). Off the top of my head, some things that changed between my model and the newer models are:
Platform under dinette to raise feet and create storage cubby
Portable Toilet cabinet no longer has a slide out drawer; just has a swing-out cabinet door
Water tank orientation has changed
Momentary switch that triggers water tank LED to see level
Battery access is now via a slide-out tray (Battery Tray ID – 7.5 W x 24″L x 14″ H)
No more battery box vents which means you can strictly use sealed AGM or Lithium batteries; no vented flooded lead acid batteries can be used
One horizontal 20lb propane tank rather than the former vertical cabinet with room for two vertical 11 lb (though only one was included).
Shore power plug is now a 15amp plug rather than 30 amp twist plug
Extrusions have built in brackets to accommodate side awning and side shower curtain
RV entry door supplier has changed; now has the thick plastic screen as well as bug screen
The drivers side front turnbuckle access has changed from a screw in marine portal to a small door
Outside shower connection now has isolation valves
Cushion stitching and fabric have greatly improved (they are now outsourced).
Water tank and pump access (and formerly battery access) are now via a aluminum lid with stand-alone seat cushion rather than a plywood lid built into that seat cushion.
4th generation of the composite material
Thermal break foam is standard and on both the mid and top extrusion interior
Skid feet are now included and available in different heights for different pickups (rather than stacking livestock mats)
Included roof L track is now 3 short section on each side of the roof rather than 2 (gives more position options for the optional roof rack)
Running lights are still LED but the corner lights are now recessed button lights
No more shore power outlets on the countertop. If one gets the optional inverter, I believe you can still get a 120v outlet on the countertop that is run off the inverter
Redesign/move of the undersink 120v breaker box and outlet so they no longer block access from the right under-sink cabinet door.
Inverter is an option
Molle rack as options

Some things that may have changed, but unsure:
Pattern/color of the vinyl flooring may have changed
Ceiling fan may now come with a built in light (though the standard LED light domes are still installed)
Sink and stovetop model numbers may have changed
I've seen examples on the fridge delete models that now show the REDARC battery manager in a new aluminum box with countertop up on the galley countertop. Not sure if that if only for the fridge delete models or all models.

I've been thinking about getting into a new CAMP-X at Big Sky RV to do some photos of the newer models/features, but all units were sold units the last time I was up there. Maybe over the winter they will get stock units that I can access.

Slide out battery tray (Battery Tray ID – 7.5 W x 24″L x 14″ H) and potentially new floor vinyl color/pattern. I have to say, I LOVE the white/brownish gray wood pattern of my 2020 and prefer it to what is shown in the below image. I would greatly miss my current vinyl color/pattern if I bought a newer CAMP-X or CAMP-HBE, but things like that open to personal preference kind of like cushion color).
Image provided by OEV.
Camp-X-Battery-Drawer.jpg


REDARC box on countertop (this is a fridge delete model). Not sure if that is really the new home for the REDARC in all CAMP-X or not. Also the new seat cushions with thicker "Marine Grade" fabric. I saw these new cushions in person in a CAMP-HBE and the fabric and stitching are a great improvement over our 2020 CAMP-X. Newer owners will be happy with this.
One can see the closed slide-out batter tray in the image. Above the battery box (behind the panel) is where the optional inverter would be mounted. The water tank LED momentary switch is shown above that.
Image provided by OEV.
2021-CAMP-X-FRIDGE-DELETE-19.jpg
 
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joepittsburgh

New member
This post has been so helpful.....I am thinking this is the last question before a purchase. We will be doing a fair amount of cold weather camping mostly at ski resorts. We have pricing for an in stock camper but when my wife saw the fridge delete photo above, she said, "Can we do that" We talked about where to put our Engel Fridge, etc. She really liked the delete because it seems more comfortable for 2-3 people to hangout. The question.....How many did a fridge delete? Any regrets, thoughts? For those with fridges, would you consider fridge delete if you had to do it again?
 

crystalclear

Observer
i have the fridge, no regrets (did upgrade to isotherm though)

there is really no better place to put one - if you want a more comfy space for 3/4, id replace the table top to a smaller one, its too large when there are more than 2 people, but pretty nice for 2 only
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
...How many did a fridge delete? Any regrets, thoughts? For those with fridges, would you consider fridge delete if you had to do it again?
A fridge delete would make sense if one ever planned to do trips and not bring a fridge at all. Or were looking to locate the fridge inside the pickup. In either case, it would be a nice option. You'd have to determine if it's worth taking it in and out and consider that a top load fridge you more than likely won't be able to access unless you pop the top. They are more energy efficient. You would also lose that counter space over the fridge (unless you stacked things on top of the fridge and then moved them each time you opened it. Trade offs but I can see the benefit for certain situations. For us, we always have a fridge with and access it a lot with the top down, and use the counterspace above it so if we had to do it all over again, we'd still get the built-in fridge. That meets our use case, but everyone's use case is different.
 

BeaverMan

New member
Camp x model 2021. We have the frig delete and found a small frig that will open with the top down- Bougerv CR42. The wires for the frig were besides the RedArc with heat shrink on them. I installed an anderson plug in the RedArc grill area. While looking for the the frig wires, I found out that the cold water line is in contact with back and side of the aluminum propane box with no insulation between them, so I bought some 6mm-1/4" white EVA foam. It is a very tight fit and spent most of a day isolating the propane box from the camper by wrapping the outside of the box. It would have been so much easier for them to have done this at the factory. There is a small amount of factory installed black foam toward the outside wall. Some more insulation could be added from inside of the propane box but you would not be able to cover the whole area because of how tight the propane tank fits.

Open frig.jpg


Frig Wires.jpg


PPbox no insulation.jpg

Above- Propane box and pipe with no insulation between them



PPbox insulated and anderson plug.jpg

Above- Propane box insulated and anderson plug added.
 

PaulPritchard

ArizonaPaul
Just got back from Montana with our new Camp-X and thought I'd post some initial reactions that may be helpful to anyone looking to purchase one.

First of all, the folks at Big Sky RV could not have been nicer. David and others involved with the camper install were great and very accommodating.

After picking up the camper we camped for three nights on our way back to Arizona. First night in Montana (Hebgen Lake), the second in Wyoming (Green River Lakes), and lastly in Colorado near Naturita.

Initial thoughts upon returning home:
  • Going over all the bells and whistles with the installer was a little overwhelming. We've not owned a camper before and listening to RJ(?) explain all of the features left me a little dazed. It wasn't his fault as we really wanted to get started looking for a campsite for the night so we didn't ask a lot of questions. They did give us all of the manuals and other materials that explains in detail how everything works.
  • The camper was great. Fit and finish is top notch. It held together very well over 20 miles of rutted dirt road. A couple of cabinet latches started to rattle a little but discovered they are adjustable so I will tighten them up later.
  • Glad we got the optional pull out king size bed. Plenty of room for sleeping but made it a little awkward sitting at the table.
  • There is a blue light on the optional fan we had installed over the bed. This is in addition to the two standard ceiling lights.
  • The Little Giant step ladder worked great (thanks Chadx).
  • Got fairly cold in Wyoming and the heater worked very well. Put the fan on nighttime setting and it didn't disturb our sleep at all.
  • Got fairly warm in Colorado and we were glad to have the additional fan installed over the sleeping area.
  • The camper rode well on our Toyota Tundra - for those of you with Tundras. Kept in tow/haul mode and S4 with no problems. I will still be looking to upgrade our truck payload capability in the future. We stayed on backroads mostly - only three or four miles total on interstates from Montana to Arizona.
  • We will purchase a toilet in the future - recommendations are appreciated.

IMG_0323.jpeg
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
Congrats, Paul! A three night trip home is a great way to get thrown right into it. Ha.

As you mention, OEV is installing fans with the extra built-in light now. Last I heard, it's in the primary fan if you stick with one or in the cabover fan for those that choose that options (and then the rear fan does not have the light).

Glad the Little Giant step stool worked well for you. If you want to reduce weight even more, I drilled the rivets out of the folding handrail and removed it. Then later, when I knew I'd never reinstall, I cut off and smoothed the remaining bracket just to eliminate those brackets which, due to their lobed shape, can catch on things.

Yes, the cabinet latches are adjustable. I didn't need to adjust any of mine but I did have to loosen one of them so I could get the Starboard protective plastic sheet out from behind it. I'll mention that everyone may want to take a look at where the cabinet latches touch when the cabinet doors are swung wide open. I found that, on some surfaces, if the latch is left open and the latch bangs against the other surface (fridge, for example) it can leave a scuff. I've gotten in the habit of closing the latch immediately after I unlatch and open a cabinet door so the latch sticks out less and potentially rubs less on certain surfaces while I load and unload a cabinet. Nothing serious, but just something to evaluate for awareness.

When I bought our 2013 Tundra used in 2015, I chose this one because it has the smaller 4.6L V8. I'm a huge fan of that engine. Like you, I also typically run in 4th (locking out 5th and 6th) when the camper is loaded and particularly when using cruise control or towing (or both). I've found that I can often run it in 5th if I'm not using cruise control and not towing (roads, driving speed and wind dependent). I normally do not run in Tow/Haul mode because I'm one of those "over-involved drivers" (Ha) that prefer to manually shift to hold a lower gear when needed or downshift through the gears to engine brake when coming to stoplights/stop signs and down steep grades. But, Tow/Haul mode is a convenient set-it-and-forget-it mode since it upshifts at a little higher rpm (even when accelerating mellow) and when the transmission downshifts to pull a hill, Tow/Haul holds the lower gear a little longer before upshifting again.

For toilet, we use the Dometic 970 series which has a 2.6 gallon holding tank. We had it in our previous camper and were happy that it fit in the sliding toilet drawer on our CAMP-X. Note that it is rather short, but since it is on a drawer in our camper, the seat height is about 4" taller compared to if it was placed directly on the floor. Since newer CAMP-X no longer have the toilet drawer but instead a cabinet door, I believe that space will fit a taller toilet which would give the option to buy one with a taller seat height and a larger holding tank. Thetford also makes good portable toilets. We typically only use the portable toilet for urine but have "used it fully" on several trips and were pleased with how odor free the setup remained when it was prepped with one of the drop-in black tank pouches. We also found that using toilet bowl liners ("Original Happy Bowl" liners for example) keep things a cleaner.

Did you end up buying your CAMP-X with a fridge or fridge-delete? If with a fridge, were is your REDARC located? In a fridge delete, I saw OEV had the REDARC up on the counter by the sink now. They may have had to move the REDARC in all CAMP-X, but I've not seen confirmation or images of the REDARC location on a newer CAMP-X with fridge. If your has a fridge and the REDARC is now on the counter by the sink, does it have a hinged lid to get into it, a side access panel, or no easy access? Thanks.
 
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PaulPritchard

ArizonaPaul
Chadx -- Thanks for your response.

I'm still learning but if you're asking about the REDARC readout panel, it is located immediately to the left upon entering the camper. I always thought this was the normal placement. We have a Dometic fridge and a 20 gallon water tank (at least I think it's a 20 gal tank). Do you drain your water tank after a trip? Is it a matter of opening a valve inside and opening the cap outside?

Thanks for the info on the toilet.

We thought the mattress was a little too firm our first night out, but after the second and third nights it felt better (or we were more tired). We're looking at mattress toppers and using one blanket instead of sleeping bags in the future.

I know we will have to take the camper off the truck and store it one of these days and I'm dreading it. Our garage height prohibits me from storing the track and camper inside the garage, so I'll need to remove the camper when we're not using it and put it on a dolly and roll it into our garage (we bought the house long before we knew we wanted a camper). I am hopeful the removal and install process is straightforward and relatively easy.

All in all the camper is great and we're very happy with it. I am grateful to this forum and especially CHADX for all the valuable information to help us confirm our decision on the Camp-X, and to help us pick the right options.
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
OEV owners are a great and growing community. It's fun to share and hear experiences, upgrades/mods, tip/tricks, etc.

Regarding the REDARC location in the newer CAMP-X, I was referring to the charger itself and not the display. The charger is around 6" x 12" and shown in the image below (along with the control panel and shunt). It used to be located under the dinette seat so curious if it is still located there with the new 20 gallon tank and slide-out battery tray or if it had to move out of that compartment to elsewhere.
REDARC.jpg


We don't drain our water between trips because we use our camper every or every other weekend and so use enough water that we are topping up with fresh every 2 or 3 weeks. If you are in hot climate and the same water is in your tank for a month+, draining might keep it fresher. In our climate (Montana) and our frequency of use, I usually only sanitize the water tank once a year (spring) with the recommended amount of pure chlorine bleach (typically measured in tablespoons; not cups so don't over do it), fill tank with water to mix it, run water through all lines and into all faucets and then let sit overnight (at least 4 to 6 hours is recommended with overnight being better). Then drain, refill, and flush lines/faucets. I've heard that those in very hot climates tend to sanitize water tanks as often as every month or two (again, depending on how much water one is using and how long "old" water sits).

I'm not familiar with the newer CAMP-X plumbing layout, but I would expect the drain valve to be between the water tank and water pump (likely accessed from the hatch in the front dinette seat). Would be fun for all of us to see a photo of inside your hatch and it's configuration. That valve will drain all of the water out of only the water tank; not the lines or water pump. For others in freezing climates, please note that you will still have water in your water pump and water lines. To keep pipes from splitting, pump RV antifreeze through the plumping and fixtures to winterize (RV antifreeze is the pink, nontoxic stuff that is safe for drinking water systems and is NOT the same as automotive cooling system antifreeze). Also, never run RV antifreeze into the Truma water heater. The water heater should first be isolated using the bypass valve behind the main control panel. Then the water heater filter is removed from the exterior access panel which lets the water heater drain completely. More posts around on this procedure, but these water heaters are easily damaged by freezing and expensive to replace, plus it's easy to drain and only wastes about 1 liter of water so anyone that will be in temps less than 40degrees might as well just isolate and drain to be safe from a cold snap.
Back to water tank...When the camper is loaded, flipping the water tank valve will drain the water into the bed of your truck and that will find it's way through the beds drain holes or out the rear of the bed. Once drained, I typically park uphill or pull the front axle up onto my leveling blocks or oil change ramps to let all the water run out the back of the bed.

Mattresses are such a personal thing and I pity all RV manufacturers as they try to include something that works for such a diverse audience. We use the pieced-together mattress from our previous camper which is 2" very soft foam for base layer and 3" memory foam on top. We felt that memory foam over the stock mattress didn't work because the mattress was too firm so the memory foam could not sink enough. We already had the 3" memory foam so used that but typically the soft foam base is thicker than the memory foam top layer, so we have the ratio reversed. Doing it over again, I'd probably do 3" or 4" of soft foam base with 2" memory foam on top, but our current is so perfect (as good as our 12+" Tempurpedic mattress at home) so I don't want to mess with success. Some people use the stock mattress and it proves equally as comfortable for them.

Bedding is equally personal. What we've always used in our campers are our camping hammock topquilts. We cover the mattress with a sheet and then each have our own topquilt. A hammock topquilt is like a sleeping back with no zipper and no back. Typically, you have them spread open and use as a rectangular quilt) or snap/synch the lower portion into a footbox so your feet are enclosed for about 24" and then the rest if open backed (this is how we use them). The upper hem can be synched as well to adjust the curve of that hem which keeps you tucked. Kind of hard to explain, but they stay in place yet are easy to pull on and off compared to dealing with a sleeping bag. And no fighting over a single set of covers for two people. Ha. You can each cover or vent individually. And in our case, I sleep warm and wife cool, so we can use two different thicknesses/ratings of top quilts. While I'm already rambling, I'll share that, since we prefer to keep all things down-filled clean in the first place rather than launder, we also always wear long sleeved tops and bottoms when we sleep such as light/silk weight or heavy weight long underwear depending on temps. Really any long sleeve/leg pajamas do the same thing; keep skin oils off of the down topquilt. It's much easier to launder clothing that down quilts and doing this extends the laundering frequency. What is everyone else doing for mattress and bedding in the CAMP-X?

Once you put the camper off and on a couple times, you'll be a pro. I leave ours on all summer and so always have the Rieco jacks removed and stored. We go on trails that would surely result in catching a jack and the associated damage. If one is mounting the camper for only a weekend trip and/or going to a campground and mild terrain drives, one could always leave on the jacks attached after loading which will greatly speed up the loading and unloading process. Just note that each jack is around 25lbs so you'll have an extra 100lbs by leaving all four on. And I've seen owners hook a jack and do a lot of damage even in campgrounds or around town, so we choose to spend the extra time to unbolt (3 bolts each jack) and store.

A small 5x8 cargo trailer works great as a camper dolly. See post #2 in this very thread for my setup, but I use that little trailer because I already had it.
https://expeditionportal.com/forum/...p-slide-in-pickup-camper.214329/#post-2766736
Any little econotrailer will work and can be found new or used for not much more than the cost of building a dedicated garage dolly and, in my opinion, the trailer works better (provided it sits low enough to allow you in and out of your garage). The big tires allow it to roll easily over gravel and other objects that a hard-wheeled dolly wheel wouldn't. And a trailer can be used for other errands (which you may find you'll use when your pickup bed is unusable for cargo due to the camper being loaded). And if you only use it as a dolly, then you don't need to register/plate it if it will never be off your property. Guess there are quite a few threads dedicated to that topic and options, so I'll defer to those threads.

Hope my looooong replies are OK with everyone. I've never been accused of providing too few details or opinions. Ha. Glad I can type fast!
 
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PaulPritchard

ArizonaPaul
CHADX - Thanks for the information. I looked for the REDARC charger and could not find it behind any latched access panels. Could it be behind a screwed-in panel? I will keep searching and reviewing all the documentation I got from Big Sky.

This is a shot underneath the access panel next to the fridge if it helps. Let me know if anyone needs to see more/better pictures of this 2021 OEV layout.
IMG_0334.jpeg
 

BeaverMan

New member
The RedArc should be in the raised box to the right of sink and to the left of the refrig. The access is lifting the small raised countertop off. You need to un-extend your bed to access the lid.
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
Thanks, BV. And that is on a CAMP-X with built in fridge, correct? I suspected the REDARC would be located there the same as fridge delete models but had yet to see confirmation. Seems like a reasonable spot now that they have room there now that the propane tank is a 20lb horizontal rather than 11lb vertical. And easy to get to that REDARC location compared to mine which is tucked way down with the water tank and former battery box.

Paul or BV, can one of you throw a tape measure on the water tank (height x w x L)? I'd like to understand the dimensions of the new 20 gallon. Thanks.
 
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