2020 Overland Explorer CAMP-X pop-up slide-in pickup camper

Ninelitetrip

Active member
chadx, fantastic write up, with details and pictures, nice. Great to see that OEV is being responsive to suggestions and changes. Really interested to see what you decide on solar going forward.
 

Ninelitetrip

Active member
Been waiting for someone to do a thorough write up like this! It is much appreciated.

I've had my eye on these for some time now, I only have two hangups:

1. Convincing the wife we need one (currently have a 99 hallmark ute).
2. The majority of our camping will be around home (Eastern Nebraska) and it gets HOT and HUMID, so we need AC. Last I checked that wasn't an option with the Camp X.

As these migrate out of the PNW to warmer climes there certainly will be calls for some solution. jmnielsen, any thoughts on which ac unit and how to power it? Staying with the Truma family the do make an AC unit called the Aventa Comfort, however I see it is only available as a 220V system for the European market? Perhaps Truma and others like Victron will see the utility in offering their full catalog for the NA market.
 

Ninelitetrip

Active member
Just thought I would share here. You might be interested in following along.... Part 1 of my epic adventure to Bozeman, Montana to have the Overland Explorer Camp-X slide-in expedition camper installed on the new 2020 Ram 1500. Check it out by clicking the link below.

Looking forward to how the camper works for you long term. I think your visitor really liked that new look interior.
 

jmnielsen

Tinkerer
As these migrate out of the PNW to warmer climes there certainly will be calls for some solution. jmnielsen, any thoughts on which ac unit and how to power it? Staying with the Truma family the do make an AC unit called the Aventa Comfort, however I see it is only available as a 220V system for the European market? Perhaps Truma and others like Victron will see the utility in offering their full catalog for the NA market.
I honestly would be fine with a 110v unit that was only for use when on shore power. I have, however, seen some 12v mini-splits that are around 8k BTU (http://stores.12voltairconditioning.com/12-volt-ves-series-air-conditioners/) that I think would be good options for something like this, and would give people the opportunity to run them off battery power, if needed.

I'm personally not a fan of roof top units due to the added height, but that Truma does look very low profile, which I would be okay with.
 

craig333

Expedition Leader
Wow, four thousand dollars for a unit I could run for about three hours. Nearly 50amps on high. I'm betting it works though and if I were camped in the desert it might even work out. If you can afford that you could afford a half dozen lithium batts to run it I suppose :)
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
Have you thought of doing any bonding to exterior such as fuel carriers or maxtrax mounts? Wonder what they use for bonding?
I haven't a need at this point so I haven't thought about it or investigated. It seems like any weight bearing they like to attach to the extrustions rather than the walls, but not sure if that is a weight limit on the walls or a convenience thing. While one could mount to the walls via bonding or through-bolting, it would be a good idea to check in with OEV for guidance.

As for bonding, I believe it is an automotive-grade epoxy.
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
Yes it was the first full size prototype. I talked Mark into it and when I convinced a friend to buy a unit he build them. Based on our experience and input some modifications were made for the production units. Most importantly the roof is a lot lighter now and we found some other areas where weight could be reduced. The units are now about 100 lbs lighter even though they have a fridge which I didn't want. I use my chest style fridge which is a lot more efficient than the front door ones. It is not perfect but I am still convinced that it is the best quality unit available in North America.
When the Covit restrictions are more manageable I will probably get a HBE. Wife wants a washroom.
Regards Stefan
Thanks for the insight, Stefan.
We are closely watching the HBE development as well. Will be interesting to see the finished product. As mentioned, we have about 3 more years before the next truck (I keep mine 8 - 10 years) and will evaluate then.
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
Just thought I would share here. You might be interested in following along.... Part 1 of my epic adventure to Bozeman, Montana to have the Overland Explorer Camp-X slide-in expedition camper installed on the new 2020 Ram 1500.
Thanks for sharing, Scott. Glad you made it back home safe with some good adventures under your belt. Was fun to visit with you during the install (and thanks for the call-out in the video). Looking forward to your series. And, I can't wait to see that truck/camper wrap you designed.
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
I honestly would be fine with a 110v unit that was only for use when on shore power. I have, however, seen some 12v mini-splits that are around 8k BTU (http://stores.12voltairconditioning.com/12-volt-ves-series-air-conditioners/) that I think would be good options for something like this, and would give people the opportunity to run them off battery power, if needed.

I'm personally not a fan of roof top units due to the added height, but that Truma does look very low profile, which I would be okay with.
I agree that a 12v minisplit would be an ideal solution, though you pay for it. It wouldn't take much to keep the small space, of a slide-in camper, cool and the bonus is the insulation factor in these. Cut the direct sun with an awning or tarp and it shouldn't take much. And having the ability to run off battery power rather than only shore power, if one was in the position to buy enough battery capacity and solar, would be very neat setup.
 

john61ct

Adventurer
I would be very suspect of a 12V aircon.

Designed for marine use at 48V more likely to be durable, have decent longevity.

There are some, super efficient, but still that's a lot of juice even at only 8000 btu.

Completely impractical to run off stored energy for more than a couple hours, better to just have a couple quiet Hondas purring away, use a big LFP bank and 5kW of panels just to cut down on runtime & fuel usage.

Best of all, go where it's cooler, why we're mobile follow the 60's and park in the shade :cool:
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
There are some, super efficient, but still that's a lot of juice even at only 8000 btu.
Completely impractical to run off stored energy for more than a couple hours, better to just have a couple quiet Hondas purring away, use a big LFP bank and 5kW of panels just to cut down on runtime & fuel usage.
Did some quick math to see how practical/impractical this would be. The specs said 45 amps for the 12v minisplits. So 600w - 800watts of 12v solar panels (which are typically about 18v), a MPPT controller that would convert and handle that much, and you'd break even (while the sun is up). I agree. That is a LOT of solar for the small surface area of a slide-in. Using 24v panels would help the footprint, but still, if one needs to run the AC after the sun goes down, you are looking at an impractically sized battery bank. So realistically, in rigs our size, one would need a generator or shorepower whether you are using a 12v or 120v AC unit.
 

john61ct

Adventurer
800W (theoretical rating only) of panels **might** give you 250-300Ah in a day of perfect conditions, just cleaned no partial shading.

Depending on latitude, temperature etc

Quite a bit more if kept angled 90° to the sun all day.

And the top power level is 4-6hrs at most in any case.

Going to a high voltage only saves SC money, bit on wiring.
 

chadx

♫ Off the road again. Just can't wait to get...
The details of solar are probably better left to another thread, but my calculations were based on a 45amp requirement at 13v = 585 watts. 100watt panel will typically produce 5.5 amps at 18v in good conditions (hence 100 watts). With MPPT controller, in ideal conditions, around 600watts of panels would produce the needed 45amps at 13v. I noted 600 to 800 watts of panels to give a 200 watt (25% leeway) for various inefficiencies. It's still a lot no matter what.
 

john61ct

Adventurer
I was just pointing out that rather than using instantaneous amps

which will vary greatly throughout the day. and even minute to minute

better to use Ah, since whatever bank capacity will provide a buffer to average things out as the compressor's duty cycle is also varying many times per hour (hopefully).

And that most people grossly overestimate the daily Ah production from their array even in rare "perfect" conditions.
 

4xpedition

Member
Part 2 of my Overland trip to Bozeman to install the Camp-X is now live! I had a remarkable opportunity to spend an entire day (almost) completely ALONE in YELLOWSTONE National Park. Nobody was there as the doors reopened to the public after pandemic closures. This episode has several stunning sequences. I think this one will get your adventure self eager to venture out! Check it out. Stats: over 1000 video clips were used, took about 30 hours of editing.

 
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