2020 EarthCruiser?

Michelle@EarthCruiser

Supporting Sponsor
Thanks, It will be great to see some updated MPG and max range data with this new engine. Also, do you know if the axles require an extension or spacers (as near as I can tell the Dynatrac 80’s are primarily used for jeeps/narrower vehicles than a Fuso)?
The DynaTrac axles we have were specifically made for us for our application (including proprietary tone rings) and are not an off the shelf axle that has been modified. As for the mileage with fully loaded weight, Lance and I took the new EXP out for a trip a few weekends ago. In the snow, in 4wd we were still seeing ~10 mpg. Of course we will be happy to provide additional information when we have more in the field. These new V8 2020 EarthCruisers are by far and away the most capable and with our interior updates and features are real game changers. That said I am still a fan of the diesels as they have their place as well.
 

hermz

New member
I know the EXP was designed to be shipped overseas in a standard container but can the FX also be shipped overseas? Is there an XL container or other (im sure more expensive) means to moving an FX across the pond or down to SAmerica?
 
I know the EXP was designed to be shipped overseas in a standard container but can the FX also be shipped overseas? Is there an XL container or other (im sure more expensive) means to moving an FX across the pond or down to SAmerica?
hermz,
The answer to your question is yes and no. No, an FX is simply to tall to fit into even an XL container but, yes, it could be shipped overseas it would just have to be done on a "roll on roll off" vessel (known as a RORO). RORO shipping is typically much more expensive and does leave your vehicle exposed to both the elements as well as local individuals while it sits in a storage facility waiting for you to catch up to her. Etiher way you get it there, the most important thing is to get your EarthCruiser and go see the world!
 

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gdaut

Active member
Very nice. I have always wondered how easy it is to get from the cab to the cabin using the pass-thru. Like, for instance, if you are driving down the road, can a normal passenger get into the cabin to get food and beverages, or do they need to be a gymnast. It would be interesting to see a video of that maneuver.

Keep the updates coming, for those of us living vicariously.
 

geoffff

Observer
I'm having trouble finding hard numbers on exactly how tall the Earthcruiser FX is. How much taller is it than the EXP?

Perhaps this is a crazy notion, but -- if I take the wheels off an Earthcruiser FX and slide it in with some kind of dolly, is there any chance it might fit in a 106" high cube shipping container?

Edit: I now see the XL high cube shipping container door height is only 101.75" high.

I could also imagine chaining up the suspension to make the vehicle squat.
 
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Michelle@EarthCruiser

Supporting Sponsor
Very nice. I have always wondered how easy it is to get from the cab to the cabin using the pass-thru. Like, for instance, if you are driving down the road, can a normal passenger get into the cabin to get food and beverages, or do they need to be a gymnast. It would be interesting to see a video of that maneuver.
No need to be a gymnast, I do it all the time to make lunch, sleep, fill water bottles etc. Many of our customers use it. It just takes practice--in our case not to step on Goldy who sleeps on the floor under the dinette.

'm having trouble finding hard numbers on exactly how tall the Earthcruiser FX is. How much taller is it than the EXP?

Perhaps this is a crazy notion, but -- if I take the wheels off an Earthcruiser FX and slide it in with some kind of dolly, is there any chance it might fit in a 106" high cube shipping container?
The FX is 10'3" when we measured it the other day. We think it may be possible if you put on slave wheels, crush the suspension and then forklift it in that it may fit. However, we have not tested this theory. The other issue is on the other end--does that port have the capacity to extract it and do you want them to???
 
EC has a slightly used 2020 FX for sale on their site for 380K with 5K miles. Such well designed vehicles, but the price now is just out of this stratosphere. They used to be priced at the base of 175K and an optioned one at 250k-ish. That seems about the right value.

I understand the amount of engineering that goes in one, but we’re talking close to half a million dollars now for a new one after all is said and done.

Envious to those who are getting one. The dual cab is rad!
 

Howard70

Adventurer
I think it all depends on what someone is looking for. The 2020 EarthCruisers have considerably more features than the 2014 that one might have purchased new at $250,000. If one wants those features and wishes to drive away in a completed truck then the price of the 2020's is what it costs to get them. On the other hand, if one doesn't want those additional features then there are used EarthCruisers available for under $200,000. Finally, if you want the features and feel that you can build out your own house then a CORE truck is about $140,000 which includes most running gear features of the new 2020. I think the EC crew is doing a good job of covering the needs of a broad base, but that doesn't mean all of us can afford what we want!

Howard
 

DzlToy

Explorer
While the CORE truck isn't a bargain at $140,000, in my opinion, that isn't an unreasonable price. It isn't what I would build for myself, but when you consider labour and materials cost on top of the price of a new truck, the numbers add up quickly.

We all know that you can build a truck for less than 140k and certainly less than 380k, just as you can buy a used LS430 for 20 grand or a new Rolls Royce for $500,000. If you were to buy your own FE140 (about $40 grand) and add quality axles, leaf springs, transfer case, air bags, seats, bumpers, winches and a flat bed, you could easily spend $50k in parts. If you have your own fab shop, you have a nice truck for under $100k. If you are paying someone to do all of the engineering and construction, you are looking at $125k - $150k in total cost.

I do not see where fitting out a composite camper shell on the truck costs another 250 - 300k, which is the price of the average 3 BR/2BA home in the US, and that is one of the reasons that I am not an EC customer. A 3,000 SF house in suburbia or a 7' x 12' box? Hmmmmmm :D
 

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Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
While the CORE truck isn't a bargain at $140,000, in my opinion, that isn't an unreasonable price. It isn't what I would build for myself, but when you consider labour and materials cost on top of the price of a new truck, the numbers add up quickly.

We all know that you can build a truck for less than 140k and certainly less than 380k, just as you can buy a used LS430 for 20 grand or a new Rolls Royce for $500,000. If you were to buy your own FE140 (about $40 grand) and add quality axles, leaf springs, transfer case, air bags, seats, bumpers, winches and a flat bed, you could easily spend $50k in parts. If you have your own fab shop, you have a nice truck for under $100k. If you are paying someone to do all of the engineering and construction, you are looking at $125k - $150k in total cost.

I do not see where fitting out a composite camper shell on the truck costs another 250 - 300k, which is the price of the average 3 BR/2BA home in the US, and that is one of the reasons that I am not an EC customer. A 3,000 SF house in suburbia or a 7' x 12' box? Hmmmmmm :D

Agreed, some Expo offerings are way out of our budget also. But you have to remember that any manufacturer offering Expedition trucks needs to hire (and pay!) highly qualified staff. Those vehicles are super complex and require a lot of knowledge. That knowledge is hard to find and costs money! When I was at Unicat, the starting wage was around US$30/hour. Now multiply that per hour and 40 staff... Those numbers will end up blowing you away if you only built 5 vehicles a year. Then there is the customer service/warranty you need to calculate for as a manufacturer. The great benefit of purchasing from a company like Earth Cruiser VS 100% home built is the fact that a home built needs to be financed pretty much with cash money only. Going through Earth Cruiser or any other outfitter lets you get financing and less hassle when you are looking for insurance.
I personally like to outfit my own vehicles as I'm 100% in charge of the components and quality. This allows me to trouble shoot possible issues on the road easier as I know the truck in and out.
 
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