2020 Defender Spy Shots....

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naks

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New Land Rover Defender retains 32-inch tyres, testing moves to UAE | PerformanceDrive


"Rogers confirms the new Defender will be available with tyre sizes of up to 32 inches, like the predecessor. These large tyres provide a desirable contract patch, making it perfect for serious off-roading. Also, with large tyres available as standard, the legal upgrade possibilities should be appealing for hardcore enthusiasts. The new model will also come with Land Rover’s advanced stability and traction management system, likely an evolution of the current Terrain Response program. Rogers said:

“It sits on tyres with an overall diameter of up to 815mm, resulting in a very large contact patch. Coupled with our bespoke traction control system, which monitors and adjusts for a large variety of terrains, this makes the new Defender fantastic on sand and incredibly smooth on road as well.”"

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JeepColorado

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Curious about the forum's thoughts on waiting until the 2nd year of a new model to purchase. Is there real value in not buying the 1st year or has this Defender been tested and tried so much that any kinks will be well worked out prior to the first iteration? Any other reasons to wait such as more options being available?
 

blackangie

Well-known member
Curious about the forum's thoughts on waiting until the 2nd year of a new model to purchase. Is there real value in not buying the 1st year or has this Defender been tested and tried so much that any kinks will be well worked out prior to the first iteration? Any other reasons to wait such as more options being available?
I think there is good points there, it all comes down to patience imo.
For me I'm happy with the testing they have performed and excited about having one of the first year models which usually have extras, if there is a better model down the track, then ill deal with that call at the time.
I expect there to be small infotainment issues or something similar, that will be fixed over the air, all the big stuff all the engineering tests would have sorted imo.

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Christian P.

Expedition Leader
Staff member
Curious about the forum's thoughts on waiting until the 2nd year of a new model to purchase. Is there real value in not buying the 1st year or has this Defender been tested and tried so much that any kinks will be well worked out prior to the first iteration? Any other reasons to wait such as more options being available?
I think this is less and less true. Cars are very well tested now, and they rarely design something 100% new. By now the build processes are well know, and we are just talking about subtle refinements, even with a new model like the Defender. I am certain a lot of components are derived from existing models. We bought a first year (2016) F32 BMW 340i M-Sport and have zero issues so far (44000 miles).
 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
Curious about the forum's thoughts on waiting until the 2nd year of a new model to purchase. Is there real value in not buying the 1st year or has this Defender been tested and tried so much that any kinks will be well worked out prior to the first iteration? Any other reasons to wait such as more options being available?
General rule of thumb is don't be the manufacturers beta tester. While the manufacturer tries to replicate real world conditions and put as many miles as is financially feasible on a new platform, the reality is that they simply can't. Laws of physics and time. That said, much of the design is leveraged from another vehicle so even 'new' is an evolution of previous models. The new Defender is an extension of the LR3/4 lineage. The power train from other models. But, there will be issues that even SOTA can't fix. I would not buy the year that transitions to BMW designed powertrains. Not a knock on BMW. Just that there is too much new that year.

In addition as the product line matures there will be features added to the option list.
 

blackangie

Well-known member
I think this is less and less true. Cars are very well tested now, and they rarely design something 100% new. By now the build processes are well know, and we are just talking about subtle refinements, even with a new model like the Defender. I am certain a lot of components are derived from existing models. We bought a first year (2016) F32 BMW 340i M-Sport and have zero issues so far (44000 miles).
I agree, the testing JLR do on components in the factory and real world seems to be very good these days, JD power seems to back that up, they are improving, but issues are mainly infotainment related, imo with Android Auto and Apple carplay + SOTA & FOTA, future issues will continue to drop.

Cars will become like phones, when manufactures are aware of a software related issue they issue an update, which you activate at home on wifi or with the cars wifi hotspot.
They will also drop new features that improve experience to keep customers happy.



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NYCRover

Observer
Honestly- the more I see this, the more I think it will be a great truck. Will it be as charming and utilitarian as the old defender? no. But it will likely be modern, comfortable and capable. I love my LR4. If the new defender is just as comfortable but more capable (diesel in NA will be a big win) and modification friendly, this is a win for JLR and will likely be my new truck in a couple years.

Since the D5 came out, I was thinking the LR4 would be my last Land Rover. Here's to hoping the new defender changes my mind.
 

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