2020 Defender Spy Shots....

I'm all about functional lifts for clearance, larger diameter tires, etc. However, at one point I thought I wanted to be able to life my LR3 for more clearance but I find my sweet spot is actually just under or in between "Normal" and "Off-Road" height and that's where I keep it for compression and extension when off-road with my GAP.

Ideally, an adjustable coil-over would help this for weight configurations to compensate for overland and daily weight delta's but IMO, lifting anything higher or running in off-road heights 24/7 is just too much strain on the driveline components to be worth it.

The more I consider my coil-over dream mod, the more I'm struggling with just putting new struts and bags in and getting another 100k of reliable OEM suspension that works!

I'm all about the bags baby! lol
 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
Amusing - lifting trucks to the sun. Ran many of the most difficult trails in Colorado with a Scout II, no lift and 31/10.50-15 tires. Hummers were too wide for the trails. Best off road performance we saw were a mildly lifted Jeep and Toyota with knobby/paddle tires climbing Widowmaker on the other side of Northrup Gulch, now closed for too much partying.
 
If the Defender manages to reach even a fraction of Jeep popularity, there will aftermarket kits available for almost everything, suspension included.

The ideal for guys who are worried about airbag failures but want to keep the ride and adjustments would be rebuilding the factory airbag struts with a nitrogen charged air shock inside it instead.


These will fully support the weight of a vehicle and have no lines, pumps, etc. Using this to hold the vehicle at “standard height” would make the airbags unnecessary in the event of a failure. If the bags and other sensors remained, you could still get “off road” height, load leveling/carrying capacity, etc. Loing “access height” wouldn’t be a big deal for most that wanted the advantages of this setup.
 
Amusing - lifting trucks to the sun. Ran many of the most difficult trails in Colorado with a Scout II, no lift and 31/10.50-15 tires. Hummers were too wide for the trails. Best off road performance we saw were a mildly lifted Jeep and Toyota with knobby/paddle tires climbing Widowmaker on the other side of Northrup Gulch, now closed for too much partying.

You only have to lift some vehicles "to the sun" in order to get a modicum of clearance. A Jeep Wrangler will fit 35s from the factory and comes with 33s! Lifting creates extra ground clearance; you don't drag your bottom across obstacles lopping off rocks, tearing up the ground- Lifting a vehicle is consistent with principles of tread lightly! It also provides room for the tires to articulate; making the ride more comfortable, more stable and greater traction as the tires maintain contact with the ground. These are objective facts. On the more subjective side I also think lift kits, within reason, make a vehicle look so much better. Take any standard off-roader and put 2-3 inch"s of lift under it and some larger tires and I'd bet the majority of any cross-section of people would say that it looks better. A few posts back when the "spy shot" of the Defender was posted of the animated version from the dash display- immediately someone created a version with a lift- Why?...because it looks better! When Lexus built the GX OF which is currently on the front page of this website what did they do -they lifted it!

The heart of off-roading for many people is the passion and individuality they get to display in their vehicles- making them unique to their own personality. A massive part of this for the entire off-road market is lifting the vehicle. Land Rover forgot that a long time ago and their sales in the US reflect it. Jeep averages 20,000 Wranglers a month; never mind the Patriot, Cherokee, or Grand Cherokee- Land Rover does half that across it's entire range. I think people vote with their $'s in capitalism and the desire to have aftermarket support and the ability to customize is paramount to the average everyday off-roader. I certainly hope LR remembers this- they will need to if they have any hope of making the Defender the volume vehicle they say it will need to be to justify it's existence.
 

blackangie

Active member
How many people plan to lift their Defender, either as a coil spring version or else with something like "Johnson Rods" if it has air bags?
If needed to fit 34s, ill be using johnson rods, electronic module or J Austin Fab lift when avail.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
........On the more subjective side I also think lift kits, within reason, make a vehicle look so much better. .........
And we have the real reason for lift kits.

If the driver knew how to "pick-a-line" most lift kits would only serve the "make-me-look-better".

Same as 20" wheels on vehicles marketed as "off-road/4wd".
 
You got to be kidding me!
Thats a glorified goat pasture, my CRV could handle that terrain.

I just don't understand LR marketing. Pictures like these with wording about "extreme off-road" and "testing the abilities of the vehicle" are comical. The truly sad part is that you know it's capable of more- I just don't think LR Marketing is doing the vehicle any favors with this. Who is this ad really supposed to appeal to- the stock trader who on occasion needs to run down a wet gravel road to get to their horse stables?
 
And we have the real reason for lift kits.

If the driver knew how to "pick-a-line" most lift kits would only serve the "make-me-look-better".

Same as 20" wheels on vehicles marketed as "off-road/4wd".

I'm not sure how enjoying the aesthetics of a lifted vehicle equates to someone not knowing how to pick a line. Ground clearance is one of the most significant improvements to capability you can make to an off-road vehicle. When a vehicle has springs or coils and solid axles it's also one of the most affordable and cost-effective.
 
Agreed! I stay with moderate lifts; had a 2001 Diesel Excursion I lifted to the sun on 37", lost just about every true capability other than looks. I did a remod and dropped it 4" lift with 35" (closer to 34") and the performance with towing and moderate off-road was perfect for what it could be.

Couldn't agree more with @REDROVER on the H1; true IFS built for purpose, unfortunately our LR3/4 IFS need longer control arms and axles to get the full function/performance out of a lift anything higher than Normal/Off-road height due to driveline angles and ball joint geometry.

I'm on 32" and some change with BFG KM2 (17") and I will say its damn near perfect off-road. The wheels tuck in the wells at full compression, full steering lock to lock with zero rub and zero modifications outside of the brakes to make them fit and the braking force reduction is null due to driver awareness. I can go on an on with this mod and believe it is how the Disco 3/4 should have come and also any other modern Rover!

17" wheel or less is optimum for any, I mean any configuration for a true SUV because ultimately, the rubber that meets the terrafirma is the limitation with most modern traction controls! Jeep and Toyota have always stayed inside this window for tire options because they too understand where traction control and tire selection work in unison.

Still liking the Defender but just seeing the price tag slowly moving up and up on this thing with the marketing for true off-road going south. This thing is probably a beast off-road and they have yet to show it or them willing to take some significant trail rash and keep plugging along! Even the wives of the men who are drooling over the Defender for their next soccer club meeting can appreciate that when they pick up Johnny and Susie and their four friends for Chucky Cheese runs!

Off my soapbox!
 

Blaise

Active member
Amusing - lifting trucks to the sun. Ran many of the most difficult trails in Colorado with a Scout II, no lift and 31/10.50-15 tires. Hummers were too wide for the trails. Best off road performance we saw were a mildly lifted Jeep and Toyota with knobby/paddle tires climbing Widowmaker on the other side of Northrup Gulch, now closed for too much partying.
Yep, you're right. I've got no idea why everybody's first inclination is to lift and stuff the largest possible tires under their truck. I spent 6 months camping around the western US, looking for difficult trails on which I'd really need my lift/sliders/tires for (was in an Xterra at the time). I didn't mod the truck myself but I figured surely it'd come in handy.

Realized that 99.999% of 'overland driving' is easily doable in a stock LR3, which is what I drive now, without the compromises of a lift or enormous tires, etc the rest of the time.

If you're in the US, you're in the US. Not the Congo.
 
Yep, you're right. I've got no idea why everybody's first inclination is to lift and stuff the largest possible tires under their truck. I spent 6 months camping around the western US, looking for difficult trails on which I'd really need my lift/sliders/tires for (was in an Xterra at the time). I didn't mod the truck myself but I figured surely it'd come in handy.

Realized that 99.999% of 'overland driving' is easily doable in a stock LR3, which is what I drive now, without the compromises of a lift or enormous tires, etc the rest of the time.

If you're in the US, you're in the US. Not the Congo.

I can't imagine why anyone would ever lift an off-road vehicle....other than to increase their off-road capability and have a better looking vehicle! Other than that, I can't think of a reason :)
 
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