2015 to 2017 GM 2500 HD

Just passing on some observations on durability. My company uses these trucks, mostly con figured as double cab, short bed, diesel 4x4. All spend a lot of time with 20 foot trailers behind them, typically at about 7k, some at 10k. Depends on the user. As we hit 150 160k I have seen 2 egr cooler failures, 1 high pressure fuel pump. Some of the trucks have made it to 150k on the original brakes. A couple def tank failures, and that's about it. Fleet is 22 trucks, 7 are over 145k. We change all fluids and filters every 50k. Oil changed every 10k.

Granted were not working these trucks too hard, but we tried it with gas 3/4 and 1/2 ton trucks, the results were expensive. For what we are using them for its been a fantastic combo. Just food for thought.
 

McCarthy

Observer
10k miles is pretty long intervals for a fleet truck towing all the time. That would be typical for a weekend warrior that drives the truck unloaded on the highway 90% of the time. Most of the fleet guys I talk to run 10,000km (6000 miles) intervals when they're being used to tow all the time.
 
10k pretty well correlates to the oil change algorithm that gm uses. For what the truck is were really underworking them.
 

TexasSixSeven

Observer
I drive a 17’ F-350 with the 6.7 and tow roughly 70% of the time. I change my oil at 10k intervals as well, and send in a sample at 5k and 10k to Blackstone for analysis. Every time they tell my I can run longer intervals without issue. I’ll stick to 10k miles though.

OP I’ve ran numerous 2500 Chevys both 6.0 and 6.6. They’ve all been fantastic as far as longevity and durability. The electrical gremlins can suck, but they’re just minor annoyances. Overall I’ve been really pleased with them, and they always came out the cheapest trucks for our fleets to operate.
 

Klutch7

Member
Nice data point. I'm impressed by the service intervals as well. I know guys who change fuel filters every oil change... always seemed a bit excessive...
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
10k miles is pretty long intervals for a fleet truck towing all the time. That would be typical for a weekend warrior that drives the truck unloaded on the highway 90% of the time. Most of the fleet guys I talk to run 10,000km (6000 miles) intervals when they're being used to tow all the time.

Work trucks get 45-50 hours of use every week. Run and idle for the entire time. This can actually be good for them, and the oil. There's no worries of moisture or acidity with working trucks. You're kinda burning the oil clean.

In fact,I think that most work trucks will last longer (in miles) with far better reliability than civvy trucks. Use it or lose it.

Sadly, some fleets can't idle their diesels as much as needed. I don't think it's been a problem in my fleet yet. Not sure if any of them use an exhaust brake under idle to increase temp and pressure in the cylinder?
 

Explorerinil

Observer
Just passing on some observations on durability. My company uses these trucks, mostly con figured as double cab, short bed, diesel 4x4. All spend a lot of time with 20 foot trailers behind them, typically at about 7k, some at 10k. Depends on the user. As we hit 150 160k I have seen 2 egr cooler failures, 1 high pressure fuel pump. Some of the trucks have made it to 150k on the original brakes. A couple def tank failures, and that's about it. Fleet is 22 trucks, 7 are over 145k. We change all fluids and filters every 50k. Oil changed every 10k.

Granted were not working these trucks too hard, but we tried it with gas 3/4 and 1/2 ton trucks, the results were expensive. For what we are using them for its been a fantastic combo. Just food for thought.
That’s good to hear, I know the gm heavy duty trucks are very reliable, for me, I just don’t like IFS. I had a new gmc Denali 2500 with the duramax, the truck did well pulling and was a good truck, it towed great. Off-road it was horrible and I got rid of it after 6 months due to an incurable electrical problem that gm couldn’t figure out, in the shop 9 times in 6 months, left me stranded pulling the boat with the family. I believe the failure was all the crap on the Denali package, I will say gm and a local dealer were horrible to deal with.
 

Dalko43

Explorer
Sadly, some fleets can't idle their diesels as much as needed. I don't think it's been a problem in my fleet yet. Not sure if any of them use an exhaust brake under idle to increase temp and pressure in the cylinder?
Don't most of the 3/4 and 1 tons have high idle and operator-command DPF cleaning to deal with those scenarios?

I'm pretty sure the big 3 expect these trucks to see some amount of idling in fleet applications.
 

Mo4130

Adventurer
Some Semi guys run a product called the OPS. It’s a hard core filtration system. Some guys have 500k on their oil. Oils don’t break down, the become contaminated. Filtration is the key.


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Mo4130

Adventurer
Oils dont break down? How do you explain shearing then?
Introduction of contaminants. If you filter our particulates and water and keep it below temps. Under 200 or so oil is good for 100 200 even 300k miles and beyond. Check it out. Big rigs are running the same oil for years. Add a gallon a couple of quarts every so often to top off the adage packages and the base and you’re good a go. Get a good oil sampling program up and running and you’ll see
 

Mo4130

Adventurer
Ill have to read up on that, sounds interesting but makes sense I guess.
Yea when I first read about it as well I was like bs. But the more I read on it I changed my mind on it. Crazy interesting stuff. I know a lot of big riggers use shell rotella


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Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
I've never seen Shell Rotella in bulk around here.

My oil comes in a 300 gallon jug. Lol. I think we're rocking Gulf 15w40 right now. 15w40resists shearing well, and little semi truck engines are easy on oil. Many drink it quicker than it wears out. So, that's kind of a weird oil change.

Changing the oil might actually be cheaper than the fancy aux filter kits though.
 
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