2005 Tundra novice build - "The Rez"

zoomspeed05

New member
I have a black double cab bed for sale in florida, i could let it go for a low price if you can find a way to ship it to you.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
I have a black double cab bed for sale in florida, i could let it go for a low price if you can find a way to ship it to you.
I'd imagine that shipping for that would be atrocious. I'm not even sure how to ship something that big. I'll ask around and see what options there are, but I'm assuming it's going to be very pricey.

I haven't done anything yet to replace the bed on the truck. My time has been taken up by so many other things that the truck is just sitting there for now. I really need to get it up and going now that spring is here. I need to get out camping with the kids.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
The Rez has some new life! I have been spending all my free time on other projects for several months, with no time left for the truck except to watch the rust from the winter continue to mess with the whole back half.

I went through and cleaned off any surface rust I could find from the frame, then cleaned and painted it with two layers. I will definitely get back to the Fluid Film routine before winter. The didn't apply it the last two years, and the truck was stored outdoors all winter. It shows. This winter I finally have space for it to stay indoors. I applied Fluid Film now to the parts that are difficult to access, and will hit the rest before winter.

I then installed a dash mount from Kam Design Studios. I've been looking for something like this for a while, but nothing was available for the 1st gen Tundras/Sequoias because of the curved dash. Kam Design solved that problem with a 3D scanner and some CAD design. The mount shipped quickly and communication was excellent. The instructions were clear and straightforward. It's not an overly difficult install, but it does take some patience. It accepts RAM balls with no problem and seems to be rock solid. I'm very happy with it.
Kam Design dash mount.jpg

Dash mount overhead.jpg

And after looking for a replacement bed, and trying to get someone to weld up a flatbed for me, after 6 months I finally gave up. I figured I would try to do something with my old crushed bed. I originally was thinking of cutting the sides all the way off and using the factory floor as a flatbed. It's a pretty ghetto idea, but something is better than nothing. I'm sick of not being able to carry anything in the truck.

However instead of going full flatbed, I decided to first cut off the outer skins on the side and see what was underneath. To my surprise the inner skins on their own still seem to be plenty strong and sturdy. I have to straighten the passenger side quite a bit, but the driver's isn't bad. Once straightened I should be able to still use the factory tie down loops. I have to say the factory olive drab primer is not a bad look. I'll paint over the primer eventually to protect it (I don't expect it will stand up to the sun and elements)....but I might just paint the bedsides olive drab because I'm digging the look so much.
Besides removed angle.jpg

Besides removed.jpg

With the outer skin removed I have at least 6-8" of useable space now. I'm thinking of making some sort of a mounting rack in the future to mount whatever in that dead space....bags, Rotopax, Maxtrax, etc. Might as well use all that extra room for something.
Empty space.jpg

I will have some things to figure out. There is an awkward open space in front of the wheel wells. And I probably ought to make something to cover up open space behind the wheel also. Otherwise wheel spray is going to get everywhere.
Open space.jpg

MIssing splash guard.jpg

Thoughts on this set up? It's the best I can think of for the moment until I either find a new bed or learn how to weld up a flatbed. Otherwise, I'm curious to see if the chopped besides will actually be a functional alternative.
 

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DzlToy

Explorer
I like the "step side" bed and the idea that you would use that space for recovery mats or fuel cans. I do not care for the factory Tundra step side beds; yours is much better. Consider a two-part Aliphatic PolyUrea for the inner fender wells and a thinned bar and chain oil, as a undercoating and alternative to Fluid Film.
 
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bkg

Explorer
The Rez has some new life! I have been spending all my free time on other projects for several months, with no time left for the truck except to watch the rust from the winter continue to mess with the whole back half.

I went through and cleaned off any surface rust I could find from the frame, then cleaned and painted it with two layers. I will definitely get back to the Fluid Film routine before winter. The didn't apply it the last two years, and the truck was stored outdoors all winter. It shows. This winter I finally have space for it to stay indoors. I applied Fluid Film now to the parts that are difficult to access, and will hit the rest before winter.

I then installed a dash mount from Kam Design Studios. I've been looking for something like this for a while, but nothing was available for the 1st gen Tundras/Sequoias because of the curved dash. Kam Design solved that problem with a 3D scanner and some CAD design. The mount shipped quickly and communication was excellent. The instructions were clear and straightforward. It's not an overly difficult install, but it does take some patience. It accepts RAM balls with no problem and seems to be rock solid. I'm very happy with it.
View attachment 724120

View attachment 724121

And after looking for a replacement bed, and trying to get someone to weld up a flatbed for me, after 6 months I finally gave up. I figured I would try to do something with my old crushed bed. I originally was thinking of cutting the sides all the way off and using the factory floor as a flatbed. It's a pretty ghetto idea, but something is better than nothing. I'm sick of not being able to carry anything in the truck.

However instead of going full flatbed, I decided to first cut off the outer skins on the side and see what was underneath. To my surprise the inner skins on their own still seem to be plenty strong and sturdy. I have to straighten the passenger side quite a bit, but the driver's isn't bad. Once straightened I should be able to still use the factory tie down loops. I have to say the factory olive drab primer is not a bad look. I'll paint over the primer eventually to protect it (I don't expect it will stand up to the sun and elements)....but I might just paint the bedsides olive drab because I'm digging the look so much.
View attachment 724126

View attachment 724127

With the outer skin removed I have at least 6-8" of useable space now. I'm thinking of making some sort of a mounting rack in the future to mount whatever in that dead space....bags, Rotopax, Maxtrax, etc. Might as well use all that extra room for something.
View attachment 724128

I will have some things to figure out. There is an awkward open space in front of the wheel wells. And I probably ought to make something to cover up open space behind the wheel also. Otherwise wheel spray is going to get everywhere.
View attachment 724129

View attachment 724130

Thoughts on this set up? It's the best I can think of for the moment until I either find a new bed or learn how to weld up a flatbed. Otherwise, I'm curious to see if the chopped besides will actually be a functional alternative.
I’m either incredibly impressed… or confused…

And I’m not sure I care which one at this point, because I kind of dig it.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
I like the "step side" bed and the idea that you would use that space for recovery mats or fuel cans. I do not care for the factory Tundra step side beds; yours is much better. Consider a two-part Aliphatic PolyUrea for the inner fender wells and a thinned bar and chain oil, as a undercoating and alternative to Fluid Film.
Like you, I don't care for the Toyota step side beds. That's not what I was going for here, but I guess you're right....it does have that look. Good advice on the chain oil as well. I haven't heard of that trick before. The Fluid Film works great, but man is it stinky.

I’m either incredibly impressed… or confused…

And I’m not sure I care which one at this point, because I kind of dig it.
My thoughts exactly.....the look is growing on me. What I did here was out of pure necessity. I would never cut up good sheet metal. But both sides of my bed were crushed beyond saving, the passenger side so bad that it pushed the inner bed metal a good 4-5" in. It will take some work to straighten that out. It was either try and save the inner bed metal, or cut the sides all the way off and use the factory bed floor as a flat bed. In the end, I really wanted to try and see if I could salvage the inner part of the bed and be able to still throw things in the back. I use my truck as a truck and often have to haul quite a bit in the bed, in addition to wheeling, camping, etc. A flat bed would make it tough to haul things as it would have to be tied down all the time.

This whole thing is a bit of an experiment and a proof-of-concept. If it works and is somewhat practical, then maybe it's an option for others who find themselves with significant body damage? I guess we'll see. I'm open to suggestions on next steps.
 

WVI

Adventurer
I like the look.
Maybe just do something with the open spaces and bolt stuff to the sides if needed.
I'm wondering of you may need to do something to keep the top portion from spreading?
What did you use to cut the sheet metal?
 

Kpack

Adventurer
I like the look.
Maybe just do something with the open spaces and bolt stuff to the sides if needed.
I'm wondering of you may need to do something to keep the top portion from spreading?
What did you use to cut the sheet metal?
I will definitely be bolting things to the side. No sense in wasting space, and I'd like to keep the inside of the bed as open as possible. Both to haul things, and that's where I sleep when camping.

I'm also wondering about the top rail spreading. The metal on the inner bed is much thicker and more stout than I expected. Even without the outer skin, the bedsides don't flex at all. The out skins were only really attached at the wheel wells and at the tail light area. I'm sure they provided some structural strength, but how much I don't know. I'm considering doing some sort of bed stiffener like the Tacos end up getting. I have to straighten out the rear of the bed before I do those.

I just used an angle grinder with cut off discs to cut the metal. They did a great job and made pretty quick work of it. I cleaned up the cuts with some flap discs. I painted the bare edges to prevent flash rusting. I'll probably put some automotive edging rubber on the edges to both protect from the elements, and also to create a soft edge.



I vote Utility Bed or glass fenders.


Sean
Utility beds would be nice for the storage, but they are impractical for what I need the truck for. They would be too heavy and too wide. Pacific Northwest trails are tight. Anything that hangs out past the cab is asking for trouble.

I definitely considered fiberglass early on. But I would need to do front and back, because just rear would look stupid. And flared fiberglass fenders without going full long travel also looks dumb IMO. As much as I would love to do long travel, I really don't feel like spending $7K on that right now. Too many other more important things that take priority.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
A friend helped me over the weekend, and we were able to get the passenger side of the bed straightened out. I still have a bit of work to do around where the taillights used to be, but I need to get some different tools to do that. But it's nice to have the bed straight again. There's no way that it could have been done with the side skins still on. It took a lot of force and a lot of hammering.

With the bed straight again, I reinstalled all the things that I previously had on the bed: hi-lift mounts and jack, two 60mm mortar cans (one for recovery gear and one for fluids), and my chase light. I'm toying with different options for storage on the outside of the bed. There was 6-8" of wasted depth with the sheet metal there. Might have enough room to throw a couple of recovery boards on the side. Maybe another jerry can for water as well. If I can find the right box I might throw some tools out there also. I want to keep the inside of the bed mostly free since I sleep there when camping. And I want to not have the inside of the cab full of stuff either.

Bed straightened.jpg

Putting it back together.jpg
 

Kpack

Adventurer
My original muffler was disintegrating....I would say probably 1/5 of it was just missing. Way too much corrosive stuff on the roads here in winter. Around town it wasn't terrible, but the drone on the freeway was deafening. With so many other projects going on I just left it alone, but finally had some time to get it dealt with.

Local place cut the old one off, and replaced with a different style muffler and new tailpipe. I didn't really care what brand the muffler was.....just needed something durable and quiet. We carried the tailpipe up high and tight, and dumped it right behind the rear bumper. I love the new placement because it can't be seen at all, and will not be in any danger of getting hit on the trails. Truck is super quiet now, which I love. I'd had enough with the loud and annoying.

New muffler.jpg

New tailpipe.jpg
 
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