2005 Tundra novice build - "The Rez"

Kpack

Adventurer
I did a little more digging on my rear-end clunk and I found the culprit.

I checked the lower shock bolts on the rear and both were torqued down. The upper bolts may be too tight though....the shocks had no instructions with them, and there are none on Icon's website for this product. When I installed them I tightened the upper nut down until it was tight and there is about 1/2" of stem thread showing. Apparently on other rear Icon shocks they recommend to tighten the nut down until it is level with the top of the stem, otherwise you will get premature bushing wear. Oops.....I'll probably have to order new bushings and do it right eventually, but that's not where the clunk is coming from anyways.

I was able to recreate the sound with a specific bounce in the bed, so I had a second person do that while I crawled underneath.

Passenger side:

Driver's side:

Tons of play in that lower shock mount on both sides. So the big question is 'why'?? The shocks were new, only have between 10-15K miles on them at most. Surely the spherical bearings can't be worn out already. The bed is almost always unloaded and it's not like I wheel every weekend. Is the stock bolt too small in diameter??
 

Sal R.

Active member
I did a little more digging on my rear-end clunk and I found the culprit.

I checked the lower shock bolts on the rear and both were torqued down. The upper bolts may be too tight though....the shocks had no instructions with them, and there are none on Icon's website for this product. When I installed them I tightened the upper nut down until it was tight and there is about 1/2" of stem thread showing. Apparently on other rear Icon shocks they recommend to tighten the nut down until it is level with the top of the stem, otherwise you will get premature bushing wear. Oops.....I'll probably have to order new bushings and do it right eventually, but that's not where the clunk is coming from anyways.

I was able to recreate the sound with a specific bounce in the bed, so I had a second person do that while I crawled underneath.

Passenger side:

Driver's side:

Tons of play in that lower shock mount on both sides. So the big question is 'why'?? The shocks were new, only have between 10-15K miles on them at most. Surely the spherical bearings can't be worn out already. The bed is almost always unloaded and it's not like I wheel every weekend. Is the stock bolt too small in diameter??
if the bolt diameter is smaller than what the spherical bearing accepts, good idea to inspect the bolt for any signs of fatigue.

For reference, the spherical bearings on my Kings are snug fit with minimal/no play. It slides right over the pin in my Sequoia.
 
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Kpack

Adventurer
if the bolt diameter is smaller than what the spherical bearing accepts, good idea to inspect the bolt for any signs of fatigue.

For reference, the spherical bearings on my Kings are snug fit with minimal/no play. It slides right over the pin in my Sequoia.
You're right, it is the bolt diameter. I pulled one of them last night to see and it's obvious that the bolt is too small. It looks like someone in the past changed the rear shocks and used non-OEM bolts.


Definitely some damage to the bolt. This thing was a bear to get out....I didn't use anti-seize when I put these in a couple years ago, but I've since learned my lesson. The bolt is a couple millimeters smaller in diameter to the mounting hole. I didn't pull the shock to measure the inside diameter of the mount though.

Am I good to just find some grade 8 or 10 bolts that are the right diameter and use those in place of OEM? Is it a problem if there are threads where the shock mounts to it?

Truck is getting aligned today so I slapped this bolt back in and will have to change it later.
 

Sal R.

Active member
You're right, it is the bolt diameter. I pulled one of them last night to see and it's obvious that the bolt is too small. It looks like someone in the past changed the rear shocks and used non-OEM bolts.


Definitely some damage to the bolt. This thing was a bear to get out....I didn't use anti-seize when I put these in a couple years ago, but I've since learned my lesson. The bolt is a couple millimeters smaller in diameter to the mounting hole. I didn't pull the shock to measure the inside diameter of the mount though.

Am I good to just find some grade 8 or 10 bolts that are the right diameter and use those in place of OEM? Is it a problem if there are threads where the shock mounts to it?

Truck is getting aligned today so I slapped this bolt back in and will have to change it later.
IIRC, the OEM bolts are class 11. A similar sized grade 8 bolt will have a lower proof/tensile threshold. Couldn't say if that difference makes a difference.

Best the check the bracket for any signs of an enlarged hole. May need an oversized bolt to compensate, but you're limited to what the spherical bearing can accept.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
IIRC, the OEM bolts are class 11. A similar sized grade 8 bolt will have a lower proof/tensile threshold. Couldn't say if that difference makes a difference.

Best the check the bracket for any signs of an enlarged hole. May need an oversized bolt to compensate, but you're limited to what the spherical bearing can accept.

The one I pulled did have an enlarged hole, but only on the top. The bolt itself wasn't moving when I tested by bouncing, but they were obviously overtorqued. I think that is what was keeping them in place for the most part. If I get the right size bolt for the spherical bearing it should hopefully be stable.

By class 11, do you mean grade 11? I'm unfamiliar with that term.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Class 11 is a metric standard for bolts (vs. Grade for Imperial.)
Thanks! I'm a rookie at this.


Just got off the phone with Icon....have some information that may be helpful to others.

-Lower spherical bearing rides on spacers
-Interior diameter of the spacers is 1/2"
-OEM bolts are usually around 12mm
-1.25" between mounting tabs
-The guy I talked to said he went with 1/2" diameter grade 8 bolts on his truck, nylock nut, and two washers. He did not have to drill out the holes on the mounting tabs (Tacoma). Been 10 years for him without problems.

I'll head to the hardware store today to see what I can find.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
I picked up two 1/2" x 3" grade 8 bolts from a local hardware store, along with two washers for each, and Nylock nuts for each. Total was around $10. I jacked up the rear of the truck so the rear suspension could hang close to full droop. Removed the old lower mounting bolts, cleaned up the mounting area from all the corrosion, and confirmed that the bolts were the correct diameter.

New bolts versus old


Everything buttoned up (with anti-seize this time) and torqued to 64ft lbs.


All noise and play appears to be gone.

A quick test drive was very encouraging. I can't remember the last time the truck felt so smooth. With a new alignment and the rear suspension actually working like it is supposed to, it almost felt like a new truck. No more jarring feedback from the rear end over bumps, and totally silent. Best $10 I've spent recently.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
I wish more fixes could be like that!
I know, right??

I'm just kicking myself that I didn't find the source of the problem earlier. I had assumed that it couldn't be the lower shock bolts because they "must be OEM". Proper testing and diagnosis makes all the difference, and I failed for a long time on this problem until just a few days ago.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Having run both duratracs and ko2s in the snow which do you like better?
I'm glad you mentioned this. Here are my thoughts between the two:

Snow: Duratrac's were excellent. I used them through a couple of rough winters and they were solid. This year we've had almost no snow, so I really haven't tested the KO2's besides maybe an inch or two at the most. I didn't have any problems with them in those situations. I'll report back when I get a chance to use them in more snow.

Rain: No problems with either one. Never had any traction issues with wet roads.

Ice: Obviously they will slide, but both tires were confident on ice. Drive carefully and they have done fine for me.

Off-road: Both have been great off road. I like the larger lugs on the sidewalls of the Duratrac's better. The KO2's seemed to gather more mud, but that may have just been different conditions that day. Both air down fine and I have not had issues with traction. Both seem to have strong sidewalls, as I've had both of them take direct hits from sharp rocks directly to the sidewalls.

On-road: KO2's hand's down. They are planted and secure on the road. The Duratrac's would "grab" and pull the truck to one side or the other on uneven roads (rutted freeways from too much traffic, crowned roads, patches, etc). It was a little wild sometimes, and did not inspire confidence when on certain roads....sway bar connected or disconnected.

Noise: About the same. Maybe the Duratracs were noisier, but honestly neither one has bothered me.

Look: I like the aggressive look of the Duratrac's more. The sidewall lugs were actually useful on some of the trails I've been on. At first the look of the KO2's bothered me, but they've grown on me. I think they fit the truck now.

Wheel protection: Duratrac's by far. I love how they have the heavy wheel bead that sticks out past the wheel. It's a great look, and kept the wheel safe on the trails. The KO2's offer no such protection. In my first time on the trails with the new KO2's I picked up some rock rash on two of the wheels. A little disappointing.






Overall I like both tires, and even toyed with the idea of putting the DT's back on. However, I like the road manners of the KO2's better and since that's where I spend the majority of my driving time I figured it made more sense to leave it. The KO2's so far have been perfectly adequate for the off roading and trail wheeling I've been doing so I don't feel the need to go back. The DT's are sitting in a stack waiting for me to decide what to do with them. I was going to sell them on Craigslist but I might just hang on to them in case I find a nice Sequoia to build....
 

Loubaru

Adventurer
Thanks for the review. Great timing too because I just bought a set of 265/70/17 D rated KO2s an hour ago. Went a little smaller and D because 99% of my driving is on road. Current tires are shot and need to be able to use truck for the passes/going snow showing so these should work out well. I had the DuraTracs on my old 4Runner and loved them, especially in the snow but they were overkill for me.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Just took at look at a well-maintained 2006 Sequoia SR5. 140K miles, maintenance up to date (timing belt done 30k ago), underside has very minimal corrosion. ~$9k which is a little high I think. Doesn't have leather seats or entertainment system, which would be great with 5 kids. So tempting though......

I need to find a nice Sequoia to allow us to head out camping as a family, and to allow us to all be in the same vehicle while towing a boat, etc.

I'm not getting rid of the Tundra....that will be my trail rig and I need the open bed for work around the property. The Sequoia will mostly be my wife's rig for when she needs it, though most of her driving will be in her Odyssey. Easier for the kids with the van.

What's a fair price on Sequoias?
 

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