2005 Tundra novice build - "The Rez"

Kpack

Adventurer
Should I be considering a carrier drop spacer at all because of the lift? I'm probably 2 inches over stock in the rear. Or does the Hendrix bearing hang lower than stock?

Also, wouldn't the polyurethane damper transfer more vibration to the chassis?
 
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Cletus26

Adventurer
For the carrier bearing have a look at inland empire and hendrix motorsports. Both are much heavier duty. The inland Empire one uses the stock toyota bearing in a big polyurethane damper while the hendrix motorsports uses a sealed ball bearing in a machined aluminum housing that attaches to the mount with rubber isolators. I have been running the Inland empire bearing since I am 2wd (for now) which does not have a slip yoke on the driveshaft but the 4wd driveshaft does which allows me to swap to the hendrix motorsports bearing.

Sean
The Hendrix does work with the 4wd driveshaft on the Tundra?
 

smokeysevin

Observer
The hendrix should work with the 4wd shaft, I can check tonight when I get home to be sure.

You will need to make a custom mount for either of them.

For the inland empire bearing I just cut the stock mount off and bolted directly to the cross member.

Sean
 

Cletus26

Adventurer
The hendrix should work with the 4wd shaft, I can check tonight when I get home to be sure.

You will need to make a custom mount for either of them.

For the inland empire bearing I just cut the stock mount off and bolted directly to the cross member.

Sean
That would be awesome. A mount should be simple to make
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Project
Ammo Can Mounting

Purpose
1st gen DC Tundras are woefully short on storage space in the cab. I have no intentions of putting a topper on the bed, and no immediate plans for a rack. I prefer to keep the bed open because my truck gets used as a truck....carrying gravel, dirt, debris, wood, etc. I need an open bed for that, plus I prefer to sleep in the bed when camping. It was painfully obvious that there was not enough storage in the cab, so I looked at different options for adding storage in the bed. Recent threads brought to mind the usefulness of ammo cans.

Cost
~$50 (40 for ammo cans, 10 for hardware)

Time
30-45 minutes

Materials
2x 60mm ammo cans
1x 50 cal ammo can
10x 3/8 x 1 1/4 bolts
10x 3/8 Nylock nuts
20x 3/8 washers
20x 3/8 rubber washers

Procedure
I chose to mount the two 60mm cans on the driver's side of the bed, and the .50 cal on the passenger side (due to having the jack in the way).

Mocked up. The tops open opposite each other.




They don't stick past the wheel well bump, and are under the lip of the bed by several inches


Mark hole locations on the bottom of the can:


Drill out with 3/8 bit:


Put the can in place on the bed and mark the location of the holes:


Holes drilled:


Assembled like this. After the first can I changed it so there was a rubber washer between the can and the bed, so it went like this: Bolt->washer->can->rubber washer->truck bed->rubber washer->washer->nylock nut.


Mounted underneath:


From the top:


Rinse and repeat for the other 60mm can. Here's a shot underneath showing that all the bolts are clear of other structures


Inside of can #2 showing that the one bolt needs to be moved towards the center due to the ridge on the bed being shorter (close to the wheel well)


All done. The .50 cal can on the other side is the same process, but I only used two bolts for that because it is so short.


These cans are solid. There is zero movement once they are bolted down. The seals are all in good condition and only minor surface scuffing/rust on the outside. Eventually I may paint them.

The rearmost can holds all my straps and recovery equipment....tree saver, tow strap, 4 ratchet straps, and cargo net. Eventually it will also contain other items like a snatch block, kinetic rope, etc. Plenty of room for all.

The other 60mm can holds all the fluids for the truck. 1 bottle engine oil, 1 bottle ATF, 1 bottle PS fluid, 1 bottle gear oil, and a full thing of red coolant. The .50 cal can holds nothing yet.

The set up now as it currently looks. The spare tire is temporary until I get a rear bumper made by Brute Force. The Scepter water can I bought from the same guy for $30. I'm going to pick up one or two more.....I'll mount two on the bumper when I get it.
 

jswift716

Adventurer
Project
Ammo Can Mounting

Purpose
1st gen DC Tundras are woefully short on storage space in the cab. I have no intentions of putting a topper on the bed, and no immediate plans for a rack. I prefer to keep the bed open because my truck gets used as a truck....carrying gravel, dirt, debris, wood, etc. I need an open bed for that, plus I prefer to sleep in the bed when camping. It was painfully obvious that there was not enough storage in the cab, so I looked at different options for adding storage in the bed. Recent threads brought to mind the usefulness of ammo cans.

Cost
~$50 (40 for ammo cans, 10 for hardware)

Time
30-45 minutes

Materials
2x 60mm ammo cans
1x 50 cal ammo can
10x 3/8 x 1 1/4 bolts
10x 3/8 Nylock nuts
20x 3/8 washers
20x 3/8 rubber washers

Procedure
I chose to mount the two 60mm cans on the driver's side of the bed, and the .50 cal on the passenger side (due to having the jack in the way).

Mocked up. The tops open opposite each other.




They don't stick past the wheel well bump, and are under the lip of the bed by several inches


Mark hole locations on the bottom of the can:


Drill out with 3/8 bit:


Put the can in place on the bed and mark the location of the holes:


Holes drilled:


Assembled like this. After the first can I changed it so there was a rubber washer between the can and the bed, so it went like this: Bolt->washer->can->rubber washer->truck bed->rubber washer->washer->nylock nut.


Mounted underneath:


From the top:


Rinse and repeat for the other 60mm can. Here's a shot underneath showing that all the bolts are clear of other structures


Inside of can #2 showing that the one bolt needs to be moved towards the center due to the ridge on the bed being shorter (close to the wheel well)


All done. The .50 cal can on the other side is the same process, but I only used two bolts for that because it is so short.


These cans are solid. There is zero movement once they are bolted down. The seals are all in good condition and only minor surface scuffing/rust on the outside. Eventually I may paint them.

The rearmost can holds all my straps and recovery equipment....tree saver, tow strap, 4 ratchet straps, and cargo net. Eventually it will also contain other items like a snatch block, kinetic rope, etc. Plenty of room for all.

The other 60mm can holds all the fluids for the truck. 1 bottle engine oil, 1 bottle ATF, 1 bottle PS fluid, 1 bottle gear oil, and a full thing of red coolant. The .50 cal can holds nothing yet.

The set up now as it currently looks. The spare tire is temporary until I get a rear bumper made by Brute Force. The Scepter water can I bought from the same guy for $30. I'm going to pick up one or two more.....I'll mount two on the bumper when I get it.
Did you paint or seal the raw metal anyway? If not that's gonna be your first source of rust and Rot on both the bed and the cans..

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Did you paint or seal the raw metal anyway? If not that's gonna be your first source of rust and Rot on both the bed and the cans..

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
That's what the rubber washers are for. They squeezed out nice and evenly on all bolts so they should be well-sealed. I may be totally wrong on this, but I would think the rubber washers would seal out water and moisture very well.

When they build pole barns around here they drill right through the painted metal sheathing with a screw and rubber washer. The rubber washer is the only thing that keeps moisture from rusting the metal and rotting the wood underneath. If it's good enough for that application, wouldn't the same be true here?
 

jswift716

Adventurer
Sort of, most metal roofing I've worked with was also painted over galvanized sheets. Plus a little extra rattle can paint is cheap insurance, I usually paint and rtv anything like that but I'm in ny and have salt everywhere 5 months a year
Did you paint or seal the raw metal anyway? If not that's gonna be your first source of rust and Rot on both the bed and the cans..

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
That's what the rubber washers are for. They squeezed out nice and evenly on all bolts so they should be well-sealed. I may be totally wrong on this, but I would think the rubber washers would seal out water and moisture very well.

When they build pole barns around here they drill right through the painted metal sheathing with a screw and rubber washer. The rubber washer is the only thing that keeps moisture from rusting the metal and rotting the wood underneath. If it's good enough for that application, wouldn't the same be true here?
Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

smokeysevin

Observer
Looks good, I have 2 40mm cans on my tire rack, the only down side is that the 40mm cans are not hinged, the lids come totally off so you need to secure one side if you want to be able to lock them. I wish the access cab bed was deep enough for the 60mm cans.

Sean
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Sort of, most metal roofing I've worked with was also painted over galvanized sheets. Plus a little extra rattle can paint is cheap insurance, I usually paint and rtv anything like that but I'm in ny and have salt everywhere 5 months a year
Good point, and yes painting is cheap insurance. We don't have it as bad here in WA as you do in New York, but it's not ideal either. They're easy to remove, so I may end up pulling them off, applying a bit of paint, then putting them back on.

Looks good, I have 2 40mm cans on my tire rack, the only down side is that the 40mm cans are not hinged, the lids come totally off so you need to secure one side if you want to be able to lock them. I wish the access cab bed was deep enough for the 60mm cans.

Sean
I had forgotten about the depth difference between DC and AC Tundra's. The 60mm cans are nice....lids are hinged, and the amount of storage inside is awesome. As far as putting locks on these, I'm not sure if I will or not. On one hand it would be nice to have them secure, but on the other hand I don't like the idea of listening to locks bouncing all over the place on the trails. Plus if anyone decided to open them they would find there is nothing in there of great value.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
I'm east side of the mountains, between Yakima and Cle Elum. It's not too far of a drive for you....we ought to meet up and hit some trails. There are three major trail systems around me: Liberty, Naches, and Manastash. I haven't done the first two, but have explored a few of the trails in Manastash, and they are tons of fun.

There are a few other 1st gen Tundra guys here in Washington. I'm all for getting together for a 1G Tundra trail run.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Trip Report

Buck Meadows Jeep Trail, Manastash WA

My friend and I hit up a local Jeep trail today for a morning run. We did the same trail last year, but it's still fun. It's a little over 6 miles in length and varies between open areas and many extremely tight spots. It's a tight fit in some areas for even a smaller Jeep, so my truck is a bit of a challenge. To be honest, I'm not sure how I did this trail last year without sliders. They are an absolute must if you're running anything longer than a Jeep. Also having a spotter is necessary with a larger vehicle.

About 1/3rd through the trail you encounter this fairly steep drop-off and tight corner. Having done this last year I was more confident and smoother this time:

The last 1/3rd of the trail is in thick trees and very tight. There was a fun rock obstacle that I'm glad I had sliders for.

This last video unfortunately didn't record one of the slicker, steep, and tighter sections. The screen capture at the beginning shows the view from the top of the hill, but after that there was no video. The second two shots are sections after the first that are somewhat steep and tight, though not as interesting as the non-recorded section. The popping you hear is from a Samurai that was also part of our group.

Lessons learned:
-Sliders are a must. Cheap insurance and also super helpful with a long-wheelbase vehicle like mine. They were great at pivoting me around some very tight tree trunks.
-Popping noise coming from the front suspension. I will need to go through and evaluate/re-torque everything.
-Rear suspension is terrible.
-Overall suspension needs improvement. Good enough articulation for what I need, but absolutely terrible on washboard. Like really, really bad. Even with tires down to 15 psi the washboard was almost undriveable. I need ideas on how to fix this!! I have to drive at least a dozen miles on washboard before I get to any trails!
 

idriveabox

Member
Following this. Also drive a DC and looking to redo the rear. At least you have sliders! Looks like they saved you on those sections.

Is your front sway bar installed? Could be source of popping. I threw some new end links on and mine is making noise on the trails already.
 
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