2005 Tundra novice build - "The Rez"

Kpack

Adventurer
Did you have to mod/bend your gamiviti mount at all?
I just put one on the drivers side of my access cab in the same location and the hood wont close without scraping it. When I close the hood, it pushes the mount towards the fender. Also, is the gap between the fender and hood enough room for the coax to run without it getting damaged?
Sorry it took so long, but here are the pictures:




I adjust mine for maximum positive caster (outside of spec if needed) while keeping camber near 0. This is what you tell the shop. But it also takes an alignment tech who knows what they are doing since caster and camber is adjusted together at the same time. It takes a little playing around but like I said a good alignment tech will know what you mean.

Everyone is going to get slightly different numbers especially if the numbers are going to be outside of factory spec. You may get close to what I got or maybe even more caster.

I did mine to 3.0 caster. 0 camber and 0 toe
Thanks! That gives me something to shoot for. I'll take those back to the tech and let them work on it again.
 

toyick

I build Boat Anchors
Yes more caster will add more scrub radius i believe when turning, that technically adds to wear.

However i wouldn't stress about that to much. 3-5 degrees of caster, will be fine. I usually tell them to get the OE camber and toe numbers, and leave the caster in a natural setting, as in the UCA' will add more so just accept the 3-5 degrees of caster instead of trying to get rid of it. LIke what they did i beleive before.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Got it aligned today at Les Schwab. The place that did it a week ago wanted to charge me again for it, and they couldn't get me in for another week. So Les Schwab got me in today and for the next 30 days any adjustments are free.

Before/After
Left
Caster: 2.0/3.2
Camber: 0.5/0.3
Toe: 0.16 (out of spec)/0.07

Right
Caster: 1.9/3.0
Camber: 0.0/0.3
Toe: 0.25 (out of spec)/0.08

Front
Cross camber:
0.5/0.0
Cross caster: 0.1/0.2
Total toe: 0.41 (out of spec)/0.15

Rear
Cross camber: 0.0/0.0
Total toe: -0.10/-0.08
Thrust Angle: -0.17/-0.13

The tires no longer rub the firewall at full lock during droop or compression, thank goodness (haven't checked full droop or stuff yet). Unfortunately the steering wheel isn't quite centered and it pulls to the right slightly. Good thing adjustments are free for the next 30 days!
 

xlcaferacer

Adventurer
the st maxx is surprisingly quiet and smooth and work fantastic in the snow and ice but they are heavy and quite stiff. had them on my sequoia in a 255/85r16 and they really wouldn't start to squat down till you dropped them down to 18psi . they also don't have the snowflake rating so if you travel in areas where traction tires are required that could be a issue ( never been stopped for it in my life )

ko2 just plain work well in all conditions, fantastic tire , there is a reason they are so popular

another tire to check out is the falken wildpeak atw3, buddy has them on a jk and I have been extremely impressed with where they drag that thing around , goes places a at tire shouldn't be getting traction still . also winter rated
I always laugh when people say the Cooper st max is good on the ice. I live in a ski town where it snows a lot more than most people have to deal with and these tires are truly awful in the winter, barely any better than than my BFG KM2's (which are siped) on my trail rig. We had them on my work truck that sees regular highway miles up a shadowed, icey canyon and they were scary. I was truly disappointed as I considered these tires for my personal rig.
I run both BFG AT2's and the General Grabbers AT's on my personal rigs and they both work great where I live during the winter. However, I only use the Generals as street tires do to the thinner 2ply sidewall. I use the BFG KO2's year round on my old FJ40 and the wife's 4Runner and couldn't be happier. The stronger sidewalls of the BFG's is a huge selling point to me as all rigs hit the trails on occasion.
Just my 2cents, hope it helps.
 
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Smileyshaun

Observer
I always laugh when people say the Cooper st max is good on the ice. I live in a ski town where it snows a lot more than most people have to deal with and these tires are truly awful in the winter, barely any better than than my BFG KM2's (which are siped) on my trail rig. We had them on my work truck that sees regular highway miles up a shadowed, icey canyon and they were scary. I was truly disappointed as I considered these tires for my personal rig.
I run both BFG AT2's and the General Grabbers AT's on my personal rigs and they both work great where I live during the winter. However, I only use the Generals as street tires do to the thinner 2ply sidewall. I use the BFG KO2's year round on my old FJ40 and the wife's 4Runner and couldn't be happier. The stronger sidewalls of the BFG's is a huge selling point to me as all rigs hit the trails on occasion.
Just my 2cents, hope it helps.

do you run them at full psi or air down ? I spend quite a bit of the winter in the snow and know what works and what doesn't at least where I live .
 

xlcaferacer

Adventurer
If you have to air down for traction on the highway for winter driving there are probably better tires out there your your purpose. The BFG's and the Generals both fit the bill as great all around tires. Not trying to bag on anyone for there opinion, I'm just saying that I would never put the St Max tires on my car for winter driving.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
I'm not terribly interested in a tire that isn't winter rated, which is why I'm still heavily leaning towards the BFG KO2. Winters around me can get pretty rough, with heavy snow and ice. Mountain passes around here routinely require snow-rated tires and all wheel drive. I don't plan on siping the tires for my truck because I worry about accelerated damage to tread when off road.

The stronger sidewall of the KO2 is necessary for the trails I run around here. Lots of sharp rocks and big tree roots. I've also heard the KO2's have good manners on the road, which isn't quite true of my current Duratracs. Mine tend to grab and pull when driving in lanes that have tracks worn into the pavement....makes for a white knuckle ride.
 

trailscape

Explorer
Got it aligned today at Les Schwab. The place that did it a week ago wanted to charge me again for it, and they couldn't get me in for another week. So Les Schwab got me in today and for the next 30 days any adjustments are free.

Don't know if you have Firestone Auto centers or Brakes Plus locally, but I went with their "Lifetime" alignment plan. Nice to be able to have it checked again after some rough terrain or before a trip.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Unfortunately I don't have anything around me that offers any sort of lifetime plan. I get to pay every time I go in. The closest place that would offer a lifetime plan would be at least 45 minutes away, and I don't drive down that way very often.
 

Smileyshaun

Observer
doing a little research for tires on my subi I came across the geolander at g015. looks to be a little less aggressive then a bfg really good road behavior but is snow rated and seems to have good reviews . DSC_0518-2-57055ae73df78c7d9e90ff2d.jpg
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Thanks for all the suggestions for tires. Made my decision today and went with BFG KO2, 285/75-16. Costco made the decision easy.....$1085 for 5 (yes, five) tires mounted and balanced. That's a full $500 cheaper than any tire store near me. And now I finally get a full-size spare. They should hopefully have them in stock this week and installed by the weekend.

Now time for some work on the truck:

Project: Power Steering Fluid Flush

Purpose: The power steering pump was whining like crazy on my last trail running trip even though it was full. My guess is that it was overheating from all the turning going very slow. Time for a fluid change!

Cost: $25

Duration: 30 minutes

Materials:
-ATF Dextron type II or III (2-3 quarts)
-3/8" tubing
-5/16" clear tubing (6 feet)
-Turkey baster or large syringe
-oil catch pan

This is how it looked when it came out. Pretty dark.


Procedure
-Use a baster or syringe to remove as much of the fluid in the reservoir as possible.
-Remove the reservoir from the bracket by pulling up (so fluid doesn't come out when you remove the return line)
-Remove the upper (smaller) line from the reservoir
-Attach a piece of 3/8" tubing to the reservoir in its stead. Cap off this line (stuff a bolt in it)
-Reattach reservoir
-Use a slightly smaller diameter tube and insert it into the 3/8" PS hose that you just removed. Run the other end of this hose out of the truck and into your catch tray. 6 feet should be more than enough.
-Lift the front tires off the ground.
-Fill the reservoir with new fluid (1st Gen Tundras use Dexron type ATF, not PS fluid)
-Turn key on, do NOT start the engine
-Turn wheels full lock side to side, check reservoir to be sure it does not empty and introduce air into the system
-Add more fluid and repeat until fluid coming out of return line is clean (I used two quarts)
-Reattach return line to the reservoir
-Add fluid to full markings and turn wheels several more times to release any other air bubbles
-Cap reservoir and test drive



Old (brown) vs. new (pink) on the paper towels. I'll probably need to add a larger PS cooler in the future.
 

smokeysevin

Observer
Its interesting that you had a poor experience with the duratracs, I love mine. I ran nitto dune grapplers and the old BFG KO2 ATs and I wasnt impressed with the BFG's. I will say that my truck "hunted" on the road but that was due to clapped out bushings in the upper control arms and worn inner tie rod ends.

I really need to flush my PS fluid and Brake Fluid out. Its good to hear it was pretty straightforward.

Sean
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Its interesting that you had a poor experience with the duratracs, I love mine. I ran nitto dune grapplers and the old BFG KO2 ATs and I wasnt impressed with the BFG's. I will say that my truck "hunted" on the road but that was due to clapped out bushings in the upper control arms and worn inner tie rod ends.

I really need to flush my PS fluid and Brake Fluid out. Its good to hear it was pretty straightforward.

Sean
I would love my Duratrac's if they didn't shake the truck. I don't think that it's necessarily a problem with the design of the tires per se....it very well could have been my fault with lack of rotations, possible poor alignment, and one time that my lug nuts loosened while driving and the tire was wobbling. Traction is great with these, especially in the snow, and they have done very well off road.

That being said, they are kind of loud and the shaking is getting worse. I've pretty well narrowed it down to the tires and not something else. KO2's are everywhere and people really seem to like them so I'm more than willing to give them a try.

And yes, the PS flush is very easy. If I can do it anyone can. Only I would hope they make less of a mess on the driveway than I did.
 

Kpack

Adventurer
Project: Tailpipe delete

Purpose: I got tired of seeing my factory tailpipe lamely hanging behind my passenger rear tire. With how far it sticks down it's only a matter of time before it gets caught on a rock or crushed. So time to trim. I'm not sure exactly how much I can trim off, so I went conservative. This is in preparation for future plans of a Brute Force Fab high clearance rear bumper, and upgraded springs (trying to decide between Deaver G57's or Archive Garage Deaver overland springs).

Time: 5 minutes

Cost: $0

Procedure: Wear eye and ear protection. Use an angle grinder with a cut-off disk and trim the tailpipe. I cut mine right where it curves out to the side of the truck, leaving enough room for the leaf springs to drop and not hit it (I'm pretending my stock springs droop that much....they don't).

Before:


After


My cut is ugly, I know. The cut off wheel exploded before I cut straighten it all up. I'll make it look pretty later.


There is no discernible difference in sound. I'll run with it this way until I get that rear bumper. Then I may need to trim it further forward.
 
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