2002 Sequoia Limited 4WD

Sal R.

Active member
Could have but I don’t want any awnings to overhang the body so much and have sun light make it between awning and body.


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I think I'm going to leave the alley lights alone. They were perfect when scouting locations off the beaten path at night, which was something I hadn't considered.

I toyed with it while at camp and, like you said, the body got in the way and it really hadn't bought me much.

That said, the alley lights really finished out the last thing "I wish I had" and I hadn't even realized that I needed it, lol.
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toyotech

Expedition Leader
I think I'm going to leave the alley lights alone. They were perfect when scouting locations off the beaten path at night, which was something I hadn't considered.

I toyed with it while at camp and, like you said, the body got in the way and it really hadn't bought me much.

That said, the alley lights really finished out the last thing "I wish I had" and I hadn't even realized that I needed it, lol.
View attachment 618934
Yup. Too many times I have gone down dark trails looking for a site to camp.

Once you get your rock lights done. You’ll have way better camp lights. The roof lights imo are to bright for camp lights.


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Sal R.

Active member
MODIFICATION: Custom Grille

GOAL:

Replace the old and busted with some new hotness.

PURPOSE:
I was tired of masking and repainting the front grille black. And the dated look. Because I like throwing the baby out with bathwater, I hacked up my front grille to update the look.

DURATION: 8 Hours

MATERIALS:
Fiberglass and resin
Bondo filler
Sandpaper
Honeycomb mesh
Painter's tape
Paint and primer
Zipties and mounts

COST: $60

HOW-TO:
There are lots of tutorials all over on working with fiberglass, so I'll stick the basic steps. I had all the materials already, sans honeycomb mesh, so I kinda dived right into it.

Fill the void spaces of the horizontal slats using painter's tape and fiberglass. I used painter's tape to create the initial contour that would represent the finished trim wall. I laid down fiberglass to create the initial structure.
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Once the initial glass layup cured, I removed the tape and laid down 5 layers of glass to stiffen up the wall.
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Once the newly formed trim wall was in place, I cut out the horizontal slats. I waited until this step to cut out the slats to make sure the grill trim stayed rigid during layup. I didn't want any sort of warping when I was laying down glass.

Look at that pitted up nastiness :sick:.
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Sand the trim flush and use bondo filler to create a smooth finish using grading sandpaper. This was the most time consuming process. Sand, fill, and repeat until you get a smooth surface you are satisfied with.

This is the most crucial step to get right. Imperfections still present at this step cannot be hidden with primer and paint. Going backwards after paint is not fun so make sure you get this part right.
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Prime, paint, and ziptie the honeycomb to the grille.

I used these ziptie mounts all around the grille trim to support the honeycomb. It's bonded in place using two part epoxy for strength.
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And finished.
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Barely clears the horn, accumulator, and power steering cooler. 👍

I'll never do this job again.

Glass.

Everywhere. :(
 
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Sal R.

Active member
MODIFICATION: Rock Lights

GOAL:

Moar illumination.

PURPOSE:
Admittedly, I bought the lights on a whim after I put in my switches and electrical framework. "What do I hook up to my switches?!"

After putting in my alley lights, I figured I might as well dust these off and make use of them in my setup to help with lighting my way.

This mod was every bit as annoying as I thought they would be, FYI.

DURATION: 4 Hours

MATERIALS:
nilight 8pc LED rock lights
Split loom
"L" brackets

COST: $16

HOW-TO:
The lights came pre-wired. Basically, mount it and set power and you're done. Even comes with double-sided tape already added to the lights. Obviously, the longest part about this whole deal was routing everything. I also spent time adding split loom to all exposed wires to help against salt and snow for the winter months.

For simplicity, I tied the lights into my aux rear lights.

I mounted the lights using "L" brackets left over from storage build and hung them just inside of my sliders, slightly recessed to prevent them from getting mangled on a rock. The brackets are basic cabinet construction materials found at Home Depot or similar. This really saved me time fab'ing up customs brackets.

I figured that the selected location was the most outboard I could mount them without having to weld plates to the sliders or have them look unsightly mounted with the wire routing.

I went with low side compliance on this job.
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Even took a bit of time to knock off the rust under there. I debated securing the wiring onto the sliders so I don't have to do extra work when I do my body mounts, but I felt better knowing they were out of the way as much as possible.
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3 chips along the slider and 1 just behind the rear wheel on each side. With my ditch lights just in front of the front wheel, I didn't feel it was necessary to add one up front. Though, because of "plug n play" makeup of the system, I do have the option to tie one in if I ever change my mind.
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It extends a good 5ft from the DS at a height of 18in off the ground.
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smokeysevin

Observer
What gauge is the wiring? I tried a couple different cheaper led spot/rock lights and always ran into issue with the tiny wires. They weren't prewired though so splicing a reasonable gauge wire to angle hair gauge wire was a mess. I gave up and threw the KC Cyclones under my truck.

Sean
 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
Question have you come across any interesting rear locking drawer systems? My dad has my old Sequoia now. If I can sort out a sliding fork mount for a bike with a locking drawer for golf clubs he would be super thrilled. He will likely be adding a intech Sol Horizon or similar trailer and doing 4-8 months on the road. I keep telling him the Sequoia would be great especially given he’s solo and would be pretty light.
 

Sal R.

Active member
What gauge is the wiring? I tried a couple different cheaper led spot/rock lights and always ran into issue with the tiny wires. They weren't prewired though so splicing a reasonable gauge wire to angle hair gauge wire was a mess. I gave up and threw the KC Cyclones under my truck.

Sean
I'd wager 18-20AWG. Having it pre-wired was a huge seller. That and it was cheap.
 

Sal R.

Active member
Question have you come across any interesting rear locking drawer systems? My dad has my old Sequoia now. If I can sort out a sliding fork mount for a bike with a locking drawer for golf clubs he would be super thrilled. He will likely be adding a intech Sol Horizon or similar trailer and doing 4-8 months on the road. I keep telling him the Sequoia would be great especially given he’s solo and would be pretty light.
You mean something that can be purchased off-the-shelf specifically for the Sequoia? I don't know of any of any drawer system like that. Nor do I know of something that could be retrofitted. All rear drawer solutions I've seen have been custom jobs.
 
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