2001 Fuso 4x4 Automatic with camper

#1
FS: 2001 Mitsubishi Fuso FG639 4x4 flatbed with composite camper

I’ve traveled with the truck full time for the last several years. It’s made multiple trips cross country as well as to Alaska and back. It’s always been reliable and has never let me down. I’m now settled down with a house and a workshop. The Fuso is spending more time parked than on the road, so it’s time to pass it on to someone else.
  • 3.9 liter turbo diesel.
  • Aisen automatic transmission with overdrive. Locking torque converter. Transmission cooler with its own fan.
  • Dual range transfer case with 2 high, 4 high, and 4 low. Manual transfer case shift lever.
  • Limited slip rear differential. Open front differential.
  • Locking hubs.
  • 175k miles. Transmission and high-pressure fuel system rebuilt at 150k miles. I have the documentation from the Fuso shop that did the work.
The truck is originally from Georgia. It’s never seen salt or a winter. Unlike most used 4x4 Fusos, it has zero rust issues. The 4x4 works well and is great for getting to the hard to reach campsites. The hubs turn easily by hand and the transfer shifts smoothly. The all-terrain tires have about 15k miles on them. The unmounted spare has about 200 miles on it. The power windows and locks all work. The original radio has been replaced with a basic Kenwood radio/cd/USB/Bluetooth unit. The truck has factory A/C but it doesn’t work. I broke the switch on the dash and never have bothered to replace it.

If you’re looking to do 85mph on the interstate, this isn’t the truck for you. It isn’t the fastest but it will never fail to get you where you are going. It will cruise all day at 55 mph and maxes out around 65 mph. It usually gets around 13 miles per gallon with the camper. I’ve gotten as high as 18 over flat stretches with the truck empty. The cab floor and rear wall have a layer of heavy automotive insulation. While it’s not as quiet as a new American pickup, it’s much quieter than a stock Fuso.

The camper was built in Alaska with the intention of being sold to oil field workers. Individual panels were constructed of mahogany facing over structural foam. The panels were then used to make the cube shape of the camper. The mahogany was sealed with a clear marine varnish, followed by a heavy marine coating. The interior cabinets are sealed to and are structural to the body of the camper. There is a ventilation fan in the wall but there are no windows. I never added any because of the constant sunlight during Alaska summers. The interior height is 6’1”.
  • 250 Amp Hours of AGM batteries
  • Trimetric battery monitor panel
  • Xantrex 40 Amp multi-bank charger
  • Xantrex 1000 Watt inverter
  • Smev 2 burner propane stove
  • Sink with hand pump
  • Dometic 35 liter compressor fridge/freezer
  • Thetford cassette toilet
  • Vented propane heater
The flatbed is 8’ x 14’. The camper takes up the front 6’6”. I used the rear of the flatbed to carry motorcycles and toolboxes. It has a frame that a tarp can be pulled over to keep cargo out of the weather.

I’m asking $18k for the truck and camper. It isn’t perfect, but you could drive it anywhere today. I’m located in Georgia. 30 minutes south of the Atlanta airport.

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#2
FS: 2001 Mitsubishi Fuso FG639 4x4 flatbed with composite camper

I’ve traveled with the truck full time for the last several years. It’s made multiple trips cross country as well as to Alaska and back. It’s always been reliable and has never let me down. I’m now settled down with a house and a workshop. The Fuso is spending more time parked than on the road, so it’s time to pass it on to someone else.
  • 3.9 liter turbo diesel.
  • Aisen automatic transmission with overdrive. Locking torque converter. Transmission cooler with its own fan.
  • Dual range transfer case with 2 high, 4 high, and 4 low. Manual transfer case shift lever.
  • Limited slip rear differential. Open front differential.
  • Locking hubs.
The truck is originally from Georgia. It’s never seen salt or a winter. Unlike most used 4x4 Fusos, it has zero rust issues. The 4x4 works well and is great for getting to the hard to reach campsites. The hubs turn easily by hand and the transfer shifts smoothly. The all-terrain tires have about 15k miles on them. The unmounted spare has about 200 miles on it. The power windows and locks all work. The original radio has been replaced with a basic Kenwood radio/cd/USB/Bluetooth unit. The truck has factory A/C but it doesn’t work. I broke the switch on the dash and never have bothered to replace it.

If you’re looking to do 85mph on the interstate, this isn’t the truck for you. It isn’t the fastest but it will never fail to get you where you are going. It will cruise all day at 55 mph and maxes out around 65 mph. It usually gets around 13 miles per gallon with the camper. I’ve gotten as high as 18 over flat stretches with the truck empty. The cab floor and rear wall have a layer of heavy automotive insulation. While it’s not as quiet as a new American pickup, it’s much quieter than a stock Fuso.

The camper was built in Alaska with the intention of being sold to oil field workers. Individual panels were constructed of mahogany facing over structural foam. The panels were then used to make the cube shape of the camper. The mahogany was sealed with a clear marine varnish, followed by a heavy marine coating. The interior cabinets are sealed to and are structural to the body of the camper. There is a ventilation fan in the wall but there are no windows. I never added any because of the constant sunlight during Alaska summers. The interior height is 6’1”.
  • 250 Amp Hours of AGM batteries
  • Trimetric battery monitor panel
  • Xantrex 40 Amp multi-bank charger
  • Xantrex 1000 Watt inverter
  • Smev 2 burner propane stove
  • Sink with hand pump
  • Dometic 35 liter compressor fridge/freezer
  • Thetford cassette toilet
  • Vented propane heater
The flatbed is 8’ x 14’. The camper takes up the front 6’6”. I used the rear of the flatbed to carry motorcycles and toolboxes. It has a frame that a tarp can be pulled over to keep cargo out of the weather.

I’m asking $22k for the truck and camper. It isn’t perfect, but you could drive it anywhere today. I’m located 30 minutes south of the Atlanta airport.

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#3
Hello,
I am interested in the fuso. How many miles? Do you know if I can get it registered and smogged in California? I am looking forward to your answer. Best, Hans
 
#4
Hello,
I am interested in the fuso. How many miles? Do you know if I can get it registered and smogged in California? I am looking forward to your answer. Best, Hans
Hi Hans,
The truck has 175k miles. The transmission and high-pressure fuel system were rebuilt at 150k miles. I have the documentation from the Fuso shop that did the work.

I'm not familiar with California registration. You would have to call your local registration office to be sure. My state doesn't do smog testing for diesel trucks. My registration only lists it as, "passenger vehicle, other".
 
#14
What holds the camper to the flatbed? I saw a ratchet strap, around both on the passenger side- which sparked the question.
The camper box has tie down/lift points on each corner. Some short ratchet straps hold it to the rails of the flatbed. I also have a lifting sling that goes with it.
 
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