1992 f150 daily driver and adventure rig.

underdrive

jackwagon
Oops just reread the last sentence of your post. So a semi-floating 10.25 is missing that awesome giant hub, eh?

Mine was possibly a 10.25....hmm..

How much would a full floater increase the payload by?
The term semi-float isn't quite correct for the light-duty Sterling, as it usually refers to the 9"-type axles with the pressed-on bearings, which the LD 10.25 lacks. Instead, the LD Sterling is set up exactly the same way as a 8.8 (only everything is obviously much larger) - it uses C-clips to hold the shafts in, and roller bearings on the wheel side that use the axle shafts as an inner race. Interesting thing is the center section is exactly the same as that of a full-float Sterling, so any differential that fits the full-float will fit the LD as well - as evidenceed by someone we know currently running the old Trac-Lok out of our dually in their F250 with the LD Sterling. But, again, it is NOT an 8-lug 8.8 axle, such a thing does not exist - it may look like it, but it's a 10.25" Sterling, 1.5" 35-spline shafts and all.

As to how much payload the full-float hubs add - well, about 1000 lbs. A typical full-float 3/4-ton 10.25 Sterling will have GAWR of up to 5300 lbs (as per the owner's manual for both bricknose and OBS trucks), whereas the LD Sterling without full-float hubs has GAWR of slightly over 4000 lbs (actual off the ID tag in the cab). Bear in mind the axle codes are somewhat generic, they list the model of axle (8.8 or Sterling or Dana) and the type of differential (open or limited-slip) and the gear ratios, but they do not differentiate between a LD 3/4-ton Sterling and a the full-float 3/4-ton Sterling - both axles will get the same first character ("2" for open diff and "B" for LSD). Same applies to the owner's manual actually, the table in its towing section is only for reference as it lumps both 3/4-ton Sterling axles together. Also the GAWR is not determined solely by the axle type, the springs also come into play - for example a 1-ton SRW Sterling will have a GAWR of up to 6250 lns (as per owner's manual, which is full of sh*t as the wheels and tires are only rated at 3042 lbs each so 6084 total, and that is exactly what the cab tag will show as well), yet the exact same axle assembly when rolled under a 3/4-ton truck loses almost 1000 lbs in GAWR - those 1000 lbs come not from the axle (or wheels and tire size), but the springs. So your general pattern for SRW Sterling GAWRs is as follows: 4k for the LD 3/4-ton axle (hubs-limited), 5k for the full-float 3/4-ton axle (springs-limited), and 6k for the full-float 1-ton version (limited by the housing & wheels /tires).
 

underdrive

jackwagon
I had an 83 f250 with a 6 cyl. np435 and an 8.8 semi float rear end. When I was looking at it I was shocked to see an 8.8, I figured if it ever went out I would upgrade.
That wasn't a 8.8 rear, it was a "semi-float" D60, and that saw action till the Sterling came about in '85-'86. The 8.8 was never used in any shape or form in 3/4-ton trucks, it's barely adequate for halftons to begin with. Besides, back then even the halfton axle was the 9", the 8.8 was a passenger-car thing.
 

underdrive

jackwagon
On a side note, the truck is running a bit warm when climbing hills in 1st and 2nd gear. Pretty sure the fan clutch is the culprit. Any reason I should or should not get the severe duty clutch? Also while I am in there I am going to put in a fan shroud as the truck has none. It has a dual core radiator that I don't believe is stock and I think the previous owner just left the shroud off when it didnt work with the 2row. I think I have found the correct part as it fits f150 thru f350. I am assuming the 350's got the heavy duty cooling system standard, while it was optional on the 150. That being said, any of you guys with a 300_6 mind checking your part numbers for me, and let me know whether or not it is auto/manual and single or double core?
The lack of fan shroud is definitely the major contributing factor for running on the warm side - the fan is too far away from the radiator to not pull air from behind it, thus effectively severely reducing the airflow thru the rad. At higher speed air is forced thru coing in from the grille, but at low speed you're relying on the fan top pull it thru, and in your case that ain't happening very well, regardless of clutch fan condition.

The severe-duty clutch, I'd run one in a truck that sees lots of crawling at low speed (so trail driving). Downside will be it will stay locked more often, and thus it may pull your MPG down a bit. If that is a concern you can always add a pusher e-fan on the front of the A/C condenser, heck yiu can even wire it up with the A/C compressor so it kicks in when you're running the A/C for better A/C performance.

Also on your dilemma of 3.55s with 32s, the NP435 has such a low 1st gear that you'll be just fine with those gears and tires. That is exactly what our diesel had at one point, engine speed was always nice and low in 1st gear practically idling down the trail - your 300 may not be a diesel, but in that regard it's darn close :D
 

Seabass

Idiot
Well.....like I was saying, someone at the forum will have more knowledge than me. Thanks for the specific side of things Underdrive. It's been a lot of years since I had that light duty. Hard to remember all the details. I just remember that I rarely worked on it, and that the gearing and small motor left a lot to be desired for a 3/4 ton truck. I can remember trying to pull some 15,000 lb loads of cattle and actually taking off down the road with the hubs unlocked and the t-case in low. I'd run through about third gear and reach down and shove the shifter back in high and put it back in first gear and keep on goin! Had to be horrible on that case. But, no telling just how many times I did that. Probably hundreds. That truck convinced me of Ford toughness. Yes it was gutless, and being a brick nose I thought pretty ugly (at the time), but I ran the crap out of it and it never laid down in 100k of abuse.
 

underdrive

jackwagon
Yeah I kinda have no choice but to remember these things, as 'round our parts there are still lotsa folks who run them old trucks, and many of said folks come up with all sorts of "creative" ideas regarding said trucks on fairly regular basis...

Oh and btw the shift sequence is (IIRC, been a while since I've done it) trans in neutral -> t-case in neutral -> trans in low gear -> t-case in high range :D And you gotta be pretty quick about it, unless it's a slight downhill, then you can take your sweet time matching shaft speeds.
 

underdrive

jackwagon
Yes the 300 was an option for the cab-chassis F350 trucks till IIRC '97, and this truck is a cab-chassis (left the assembly line as an incomplete vehicle). The E4OD is an electronic transmission, so the PCM has to control both it and obviously the engine - the only way for that to happen correctly is if the 4.9 + E4OD was a factory setup. Well you could do an ECM from a 4.9 stickshift vehicle and a TECA from an E4OD diesel and end up with a separate computer for each, but why even bother when the E4 wasn't (at least in its factory form, especially the rarly models) all that great of a transmission to begin with? So I'd say yes, most likely it was ordered like that.
 

UHAULER

Explorer
That wasn't a 8.8 rear, it was a "semi-float" D60, and that saw action till the Sterling came about in '85-'86. The 8.8 was never used in any shape or form in 3/4-ton trucks, it's barely adequate for halftons to begin with. Besides, back then even the halfton axle was the 9", the 8.8 was a passenger-car thing.
Sorry to burst your bubble, but ford did put an 8.8 semi float in an f250. I had one.
 

UHAULER

Explorer

underdrive

jackwagon
You might learn something
Nah, not really - all you just did was confirm that Ford had about as little common sense back then as they still do now, which is something I was already fully aware of :D

Joke aside, yeah, that's news to me, as every pre-Sterling LD 3/4-ton I've ran into has been a Dana axle, and everyone I know who's messed with one had the same experience. Add the fact that tons of the people on the internet don't have a freakin clue as what exactly their own truck is equipped with, and you can see why I doubted your statement... I do stand corrected tho, so you win this one! LOL
 

UHAULER

Explorer
Nah, not really - all you just did was confirm that Ford had about as little common sense back then as they still do now, which is something I was already fully aware of :D

Joke aside, yeah, that's news to me, as every pre-Sterling LD 3/4-ton I've ran into has been a Dana axle, and everyone I know who's messed with one had the same experience. Add the fact that tons of the people on the internet don't have a freakin clue as what exactly their own truck is equipped with, and you can see why I doubted your statement... I do stand corrected tho, so you win this one! LOL
It's all good . I won't call you a jackwagon :sombrero:
 

greengreer

Adventurer
I am on the fence about the hd fan clutch. Not too worried about mpgs at this point, got a big tank and fuel is cheap right now.

As far as gearing, I wish I had 3.55s. I think that would be a good number for me. Right now I am on 33's with 3.08. I'm sort of used to it at this point but I would add a few hundred rpms on the highway for a little less clutch action on takeoff.
 

Rustlin'

New member
That's a lot of work for a somewhat minimal change but I understand completely. Id maybe go down to a 3.73 or 4.10 to justify it. 35s wouldn't hurt either ;-).

My 2wd 2.73 gears are atrocious. I had the opportunity to wring it out last year..

I was pulling at least 5,500 lbs with maybe 2,000 lbs in the bed (I know, I know). Obviously the lack of granny gear sucked and so did the gearing but it got to 55 and wouldn't go any faster lol. Then my front brake lines ruptured and I put a stop to that. Stock tires.


So in summary, that further cemented my love for the straight 6. I probably won't go diesel because highway speed would most likely be similar (7.3 idi), maybe 5mph faster. They'll both pull.
 

greengreer

Adventurer
I understand most people wouldn't bother going to 3.55 but it will basically be the same as stock. 3.08's and 29" tires are basically equal to 3.55 and 33" tires. Granted this doesn't make up for the heavier tire.
By switching to a stock ratio I could switch rear axles for one with trakloc and just swap out the 3rd member up front, saving me a ton of money install.
If I go this route I will probably have the rear gears changed and add a truetrac, and just do the 3rd member swap up front. Theoretically this could be done with 4.10's too, as you can use a D50 ttb 3rd member in the d44.

Had some time today to track down an exhaust leak that has become apparent recently. It's the AIR tube, which is pretty common. Being in a county that doesn't do emissions testing, and already not having a catalytic converter, I decided to remove the AIR pump and all it's bits and pieces. The pump itself was fine but I went ahead and got rid of it as its been useless since I bought the truck. I am yet to remove the actual problem child, the AIR tube, as I need to source the correct bolts to plug the holes in the head. Looks like I'll have to order them as they've proven difficult to find locally. 9/16x2.5" 18tpi is what I have read works on the 300's. Also, just to post this info. If anyone is interested in deleting the smog pump the belt you will need is 6 rib and 79-80". Almost everything I read recommend 800k6 but I couldn't get one locally today so I got 795k6. It fit easily and if I was super picky I would go 790k6 as I think it would be a perfect fit for my application.
 

underdrive

jackwagon
The Grimmjeeper calculator says you'll be around 2300 at 65 with the 3.55s and 35s, so that should be fairly decent for both torque and acceptable fuel economy. A friend of ours has a halfton with the ZF and 3.55s and a 4.9 engine like yours and factory-sized tires, the calculator says he's turning a few hundred RPMs below where you'd be at and he's in the high teens consistently in MPG. Certainly doesn't feel like he's lacking torque to get things moving either, you'll lose some of that with the 35" tires but you'll gain it back from the NP435 creeper gear, so I'd think overall you'd be happy with the new gears.

Wouldn't do 4.10s on a truck without OD transmission, may be ok for a 302 that likes to revv u higher, but for an essentially industrial engine like the 300 keeping egine speed down seems to work out better.

The belt thing, do factor in the fact that not all reman alternators come with the same size pulley, slight variance there would easily account for the differences in legth for the best-fitting belt.
 
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