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12V plugs and sockets that are not cigarette lighter style

Norcalfamily

New member
Did you panel mount them using these (http://www.powerwerx.com/powerpole-accessories/powerpole-outlet-cover-plate-electrical-box.html)
in one of these (http://www.powerwerx.com/powerpole-accessories/powerpoles-chassis-mount-4-sets.html)

What are they like to plug and un-plug - i.e. is there a clip you have to squeeze or something and does it require much force?

Does it feel like they'll be good for a ton of cycles without breaking?

Thanks,
-Dan

They go together like Lego pieces.
 

dwh

Tail-End Charlie
I'm thinking something like this:

View attachment 283144

I've used a million of those over the years. Not the permanent mount socket, but the male and female with wire leads. The two drawbacks are that smaller wires going into them will eventually - despite the strain relief - break, and if it overheats much at all that plastic ring at the end of the male plug will expand/melt and the male plug will get stuck in the receptacle.

Still, they are cheap and easy to find (Radio Shack) and they last for years and are easy to replace, so I keep using them.

Dunno the actual rating, but I've seen overheat with a lot less than 10a so I'd say 5a max.

Also, they don't have an internal fuse like most cig lighter plugs do.
 

cwvandy

Adventurer
Try these guys. They sell the "Hella" or BMW style plug.
I have wired a couple of motorcycles, a Tacoma and a Tundra using their plugs and sockets. Small than a cigarette lighter, stays plugged in and more durable.

http://www.powerlet.com
 

Azazruk

New member
Look into the motor cycle arena they use a two prong plug, looks like a smaller version of a trailer harness or the end of a battery tender
 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
Look into the motor cycle arena they use a two prong plug, looks like a smaller version of a trailer harness or the end of a battery tender
http://www.amazon.com/CES-Gauge-Qui...qid=1431363639&sr=1-1&keywords=CES+power+plug

The issue I have found with these is that they are very hard to find with heavier good gauge wire and they seem stupidly expensive. RV dealers stock them for PV installations and I have seen a round plate weather proof socket for this style plug but again its stupidly expensive $30 for a plastic round socket you silicone down to seal and it has a cheap flimsy plastic cap you snap into place.

I've found some auto style two prong plugs but I couldn't find any with anything heavier than 16gauge wire on them which limits what you can do with those. I'm using these little weather proof snap plug auto style plugs for my light weight 1amp LED lights, but they are too light weight for PV use or powering your ARB fridge etc. Which is a bummer. I have seen some RC car battery cables that had 10gauge wire on them some of those guys are pushing pretty big power at high rates through those plugs so I think with some more digging its probably a better chance of finding a source for plugs with decent gauge wire in the RC circles. The old style Tamiya RC battery plugs have been around for decades and are very durable and well proven but I've only seen them with around 12gauge wire on them. Not sure you could get 10gauge wire on them or not.
 

Tennmogger

Explorer
"Merit" connectors, good info. This type of connector has been around for many years but I never knew what to call them. This type connector was common in German military vehicles such as the Unimog 404 radio communications trucks from the 60's! Their usage was at 24 vdc. I use a bunch of them for 24v radios and 24 truck accessories so there's no confusion with 12v stuff. For 12v the Ham Radio ARES standard connector is the Andersen Powerpole, and they are superb. In case you have not noticed, they are ambidextrous (or whatever the right term is) and can be used for source or load with same pair arrangement, if you choose to do so. Very handy for plugging in a battery to another source, as for charging. Can't do that with any other connector I know of.

Merit connectors appear to be the same as the old German connectors, which I know are the same as the John Deere and BMW connectors.

Part numbers at your local John Deere store: (but you can buy them cheaper)
RE11344 for the plug
AL25073 for the socket

Bob
 

unseenone

Explorer
You can do the Unisex Anderson connectors for charging, or do the larger ones.

The small size ones for radios, lights, etc. The ratings for the three main ones are 15, 30 and 45 amp. Support wire up to AWG #10.

The best assortment, albeit a bit overpriced is at powerwerx. The best pricing is to buy individual components in bulk packs. See them all here

There are two crimpers, one nice one, with a jaw assortment, so you can use it on other types of connectors, It is fairly nice quality and does a good job crimping. It's a bit of a pain to change jaws. The larger crimper, is a hydraulic one, and though a different color, appears to be the same one as the yellow one sold at harbor freight for a fraction of the cost. You will need this one for any wire size from #10 and up.

I have not had any issues with heating or problems with these. You simply need to run the appropriate sized wire, and corresponding connectors.

In the years I have been using them I have not had any problems with them. If you are using the smaller ones in pairs, it is best to buy the bonded pair ends, although you can actually slide them together, glue them or put a roll pin in. Using the small "clips" to keep them from pulling apart is a plus, but if you run your wire right, there should not be any pull on the wire to begin with. The larger modular ones are a bit rediculous size wise, so I would avoid them. I have and am using all of them.

The larger ones in the same style go up to 50, 75, 120 and 180 amps, and support wire up to AWG 1/0, 1, 2, 4 and 6. If you are going that big I prefer the combinations ones, they are more compact.

The pair Anderson connectors, which Warn uses for example come in 50, 125, 175 and 350 amps. AWG 6-8-10 through 1/0, 2/0, 3/0 and 4/0 respectively.

ARRL chose this as a standard for interoperability which is why I got started with them. Despite not really being involved with a single other Ham operator in my area or elsewhere. That is sort of the point, if everyone standardizes, it does not matter, strange people and their gear will plug and play and everyone knows how it works.

I hope this provides a reasonable overview for folks.
 

robgendreau

Explorer
I think the Anderson power poles are best, but I'm kinda tired of all the adapters I need.

And although we hate cig lighter plugs, do take care before replacing them. Sometimes they have stuff inside, often a fuse, and sometimes even voltage or current limiters. And sometimes they aren't marked. Replace something that is supposed to be 10v with 12v and ouch. And you may need fuses.

I've been doing more lately with DC plugs/receptacles; the 2.1mm/5.5mm variety seem the most ubiquitous and are popping up on more and more items of equipment. So there are lots of adapters, converters, gender changers, etc out there for so cheap it isn't even worth the time to solder up my own. Not good for heavier wire, of course, but for the small stuff I now use them instead of the power poles because they are a bit tidier, and cheaper.
 

Pilat

Tossing ewoks on Titan
I've been doing more lately with DC plugs/receptacles; the 2.1mm/5.5mm variety seem the most ubiquitous
[strike]Which are those? How do they look?[/strike]

Nvm, I figured it out. Personally, I find that more and more items are USB powered, or rather, making use of the USB form factor to provide power. 12V items tend to use a variety of plugs, depending on the item.
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
Hi All,

I'm bumping this thread because I'm designing my next expedition vehicle, and I want to re-visit this topic.

For my Africa Jeep I wound up using these connectors:



They're "5.5mm x 2.1mm barrell connectors"

They worked quite well for most things, and I still use them to this day and I'm mostly happy with them - the only problem is they're only rated to 5Amps.

For my laptop and my soldering iron, which both draw closer to 10Amps, the connectors and the wiring get HOT, to the point the plastic feels like it might melt.

So I'm wondering if anyone has a similar kind of connector, but maybe one that's rated for 10Amps?
I know PC laptops use something like this that can pull a lot of current, so something must exist.

Cheers,
-Dan
 
Hi All,

I'm bumping this thread because I'm designing my next expedition vehicle, and I want to re-visit this topic.

For my Africa Jeep I wound up using these connectors:



They're "5.5mm x 2.1mm barrell connectors"

They worked quite well for most things, and I still use them to this day and I'm mostly happy with them - the only problem is they're only rated to 5Amps.

For my laptop and my soldering iron, which both draw closer to 10Amps, the connectors and the wiring get HOT, to the point the plastic feels like it might melt.

So I'm wondering if anyone has a similar kind of connector, but maybe one that's rated for 10Amps?
I know PC laptops use something like this that can pull a lot of current, so something must exist.

Cheers,
-Dan
Have you looked at Anderson connectors? I use them quite a bit for my higher current or dedicated 12v item and they make very clean round hole sockets/connectors.

In many cases, I’ve cut off the cigarette lighter plug and replaced it with Anderson connectors (for instance the charger for my cordless tools) or make a short pig tail adapter from Anderson to a traditional cigarette lighter socket so I can use things that I didn’t adapt (a camera battery charger) or in case someone needs to plug in one of their items.

Highly recommend them!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
OK, to answer my own question, it seems like the SAE plugs can work really well for what I want.


So I'll cut that wire in in the middle, wire the receptacle into my vehicle in a convenient spot, and then wire my laptop charger to the plug end.
This one comes with 10AWG wire.


If you go with 12AWG you can get a two pack for the same price...


-Dan
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
Have you looked at Anderson connectors? I use them quite a bit for my higher current or dedicated 12v item and they make very clean round hole sockets/connectors.

In many cases, I’ve cut off the cigarette lighter plug and replaced it with Anderson connectors (for instance the charger for my cordless tools) or make a short pig tail adapter from Anderson to a traditional cigarette lighter socket so I can use things that I didn’t adapt (a camera battery charger) or in case someone needs to plug in one of their items.

Highly recommend them!

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Anderson connectors are great, I just find them WAY to big and bulky for what I want.
Part of the reason I don't want traditional 12v cig lighter sockets/plugs is because of how bulky they are!

-Dan
 

kootenay

Intergalacticsuperintendent
Hey Dan, not sure what amperage you are planning, but have you seen these before? They come in 30amp 60 amp and 90 amp versions.
 
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