110 ExMOD Defender

Scott Brady

Founder
The security is the appeal for me as well.

Use a simple window curtain in the back and in the front windows and no one will mess with it. Out of sight really works the best, especially with a simple vehicle like the MOD. One of our trucks had the smash and grab in Nicaragua.

I also think every truck used for international travel should be able to sleep the occupants inside. Only in a pinch, but there are times when you must stealth park and a roof tent or ground tent just will not do.
 

Chucaro

Adventurer
The security is the appeal for me as well.

Use a simple window curtain in the back and in the front windows and no one will mess with it. Out of sight really works the best, especially with a simple vehicle like the MOD. One of our trucks had the smash and grab in Nicaragua.

I also think every truck used for international travel should be able to sleep the occupants inside. Only in a pinch, but there are times when you must stealth park and a roof tent or ground tent just will not do.
I can telling you that here in Australia couple of times I was glad that I have a hard roof above my head.
So security it is not only an importan consideration for touring in South America, I like to have it in Australia, USA and any other country.
 

kellymoe

Expedition Leader
I hear you on that. My trucks security system is a curtain over the back window and a relatively clean cab with a locking Tuffy Box. Although my doors lock they can be jimmied in seconds so I dont even bother locking them anymore. I have a plug in LED light in the 12v outlet that gives off a red light that shows it's charging, I cant tell you how many people have seen the red light in the cab at night and thought it was a security system light. I keep my truck loaded and ready to go with camping, backpacking and climbing gear, all hidden by a Union Jack that I won in a raffle that I immediately turned into a curtain for privacy and security, so far no problems. But really anyone who steals a 130 crew cab in California is going to stick out like a sore thumb and the RHD stick shift is probably another deterrent to would-be robbers:sombrero:

Sleeping in the back is fine for one but cramped for two unless it's my son or daughter who are both still very young. Most nights are spent on the ground if out with the family but solo trips I stack the pads and sleep like a king in the back, if it's a nice night I fold down the side wall of the camper shell and watch the stars and moon or if inclement weather is possible I can batten down the hatches and be out of the elements. I light the inside with 12v LED lighting that draws next to nothing in power and provides more than enough light for reading or cooking inside if need be. I also have a 12v water pump that can be hooked to a tank under the rear seats or simply stick the pick up tube in another water source and you have water on demand though most trips I simply use a gravity feed tank for simplicity and less power draw.


In the pictures you can see the side down for mild nights and a typical sleep set up in the second picture, the only issue is removing gear to make space to sleep. If weather is an issue I open the awning and store gear under it and or put gear in the cab.





The security is the appeal for me as well.

Use a simple window curtain in the back and in the front windows and no one will mess with it. Out of sight really works the best, especially with a simple vehicle like the MOD. One of our trucks had the smash and grab in Nicaragua.

I also think every truck used for international travel should be able to sleep the occupants inside. Only in a pinch, but there are times when you must stealth park and a roof tent or ground tent just will not do.
 

Attachments

Scott Brady

Founder
The ExMOD gets out on the trails. With the Detroit Locker in the rear, the TruTrac in front and the long wheelbase, it had an easy time on Flat Iron Mesa.






It did get hung-up on one ledge.
 

Maryland 110

Adventurer
It was said above but that is a very late rear tub and frame on the 110- ie later than 2000my.
The 110 hard tops with no side windows (aka 110 commercial or vans) can be damn scary @ intersections that are not right angles if you don't have a second set of eyes in the passenger seat.

Neat trucks. Post more pictures Scott !
 

aka rover

Adventurer
I like this thread any other 110 MOD conversions

Ex MOD that has windows cut in to it, its a 85 with the 3.5 V8 5spd. getting it all back into shape.

006.JPG
 

Canol 109

Observer
x-MoD??

It is a very nice rig that is for sure...but x-MoD??? Not sure about that.

This truck has one piece doors, whereas most MoD trucks have the standard 2 piece setup. The lack of side lockers is odd...although not completely unheard of. However the civilian dash makes me question whether of not this is a MoD Look-Alike? Also no military rear bumperettes, civilian plastic light lens, as opposed to the screw on standard set up...hmmmm??? Snorkel is definitely aftermarket.

Plus, the hood decal says Defender...if this is real (1990), then how did this get into the U.S. as currently only Land Rover 110's (pre-1990) would be eligible.

As a member of the EMLRA (Ex-Military Land Rover Association - UK) I tend to notice these little oddities. Now saying all of this I could be completely wrong as the MoD used a variety of LR variants. If it really is an x-MoD it will have a MoD data plate on the side of the seat box...anyone seen this?

Still a very, very nice clean ride.

Here's mine...1991 19 KK 88 (MoD registration #)
300TDi w/R380 (originally 2.5 NA Diesel)
DSC_0002_x.jpg
 

Canol 109

Observer
It was said above but that is a very late rear tub and frame on the 110- ie later than 2000my.
The 110 hard tops with no side windows (aka 110 commercial or vans) can be damn scary @ intersections that are not right angles if you don't have a second set of eyes in the passenger seat.

Neat trucks. Post more pictures Scott !
Ive been doing it with a rhd for the last two years. I have a BIG wing mirror that is my saving grace. Merging left into oncoming traffic is always exciting:Wow1:
wing mirror.jpg
 
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RWT

New member
Anyone know where the original truck mentioned here was purchased/modified? That is pretty much exactly what Im looking to get into!
 

Snagger

Explorer
That is a really tidy 110, but unless it was "white fleet", it isn't remotely standard for an ex-MoD 110. All green fleet (combat deployable) 110s had MoD lighting, the two-piece doors, side can lockers and the 12J 2.5nad, except for the Royal Marines, who had some V8s (seems odd, given the RM's requirement for wading and the V8's water intolerance, but there you go...). No 300Tdis were on the green fleet until the TULs and TUMs arrived, but the older 90s and 110s tended to keep their 12Js even after going through rejvuenation programmes, though some got Tdis at that point.They also all had bare fascia panels around the vents, not only never using the 2002+ trim but also lacking the grey plastic trim between the upper and lower fascias. Body panels that smooth were also only ever seen on very new or RAF vehicles! White fleet vehicles were just civvy spec vehicles,usually hard top, used within the UK in support roles, and were painted in civilian colours. They would have had more internal trim, lack the jerry can lockers and had standard lighting and civvy body parts and paint (all sorts of colours, not just white). So, I'm quite curious as to whether its a very tenderly rebuilt and modified green fleet vehicle or a smartly repainted white fleet example - I wouldn't be able to tell from the running gear or chassis. It's a very nice vehicle, either way.
 
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