¿What tire size do you wish existed? But does not.

javajoe79

Fabricator
10 inch wide tires in 35 and 37 inch diameters. In a perfect world they would be available for 16.5 wheels for cheap double bead locks but 17 or 18 would probably be more realistic. I find that 12.5 and above widths and above tend to hydroplane in rain and snow on the road.
Yup. Something tall and actually skinny. I currently have H1 wheels recentered but will be building some 17" double beadlocks soon enough because there are almost no tires available for 16.5" wheels that make sense.
 

Smileyshaun

Observer
More options in a 35x10.50 ( there is only 3 right now ) , outside the USA there is a lot more to choose from . Really Think if more manufactures made them they would sell like hotcakes. It’s usually the width of a 35 that keeps it from fitting on a rig not the hight .
 

billiebob

Well-known member
Well I am glad Ford didn't worry about making wheels interchangeable with the fullsizes
Yes remember the 7 stud F250 wheel.

remember when
12" was the econo box standard
13" the Euro
14" the Chevy
15" the Pontiac
16" the 3/4 and 1 ton standard.

then Ford thru in the 16.5"
AND remember the Ford/Michelin TRX debacle.

I hope the 20 and 22 sizes follow the TRX into oblivion.
 
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85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
Yes remember the 7 stud F250 wheel.

remember when
12" was the econo box standard
13" the Euro
14" the Chevy
15" the Pontiac
16" the 3/4 and 1 ton standard.

then Ford thru in the 16.5"
AND remember the Ford/Michelin TRX debacle.

but the real stupidity are the 20s and 22s
Dad has converted all of the big three over the years from the pretty much dead 16.5 to 16's.

7 lug actually still happens, or has happened fairly recently. Started in '97, in '99 they went from F-250LD to F-150 7700. I have seen 04-08 F-150's in the JY with 7 lugs, not sure what that gen called the 7 lug trucks and if/when it stopped.
 
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roving1

Well-known member
I hope globally there is enough 16" wheels needing tires to make for an OK period of availability and a slow decline. But I will import out of North America or stockpile new tires before I go to 17' or 18" tires. Less sidewall is 100% stupid for off roading, particularly for 33" and down size tires.
 

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Smileyshaun

Observer
Intercos rubber compound tech is strictly from the age of dinosaurs. On a cold wet road they are death and damage waiting to happen. I would not use those things except on a toy trailer rig or swamp buggy thing in warm weather.
From my experience around here most deep snow wheelers run swampers work fantastic when your pushing through 4+ feet of snow .
 

roving1

Well-known member
From my experience around here most deep snow wheelers run swampers work fantastic when your pushing through 4+ feet of snow .
Any giant tire works better than a stock size when the snow is that deep. But conversely none of those people seem to have ever tried a snow tire in winter and seem to have no idea what works better in every situation other than virgin trailbreaking through deep snow.

On a wet mountain road or snow packed road I would take a crappy set of all seasons before swampers. I'm speaking from actual experience too. They are awful tires from any other metric except rock crawling and super deep snow and mud. By awful I mean there are tires that do the extreme mission with way less worse road cold and wet performance. They are not all that relevant with the last 5-8 years of tire tech.

They had there place for a long time. Swampers and Ground Hawgs were swell in 1985 but in 2019, no way.

If anyone ever tried snow wheeling on actual SUV spec snow tires they would light there swampers on fire, save for extreme situations like where breaking trail on 40's trumps better traction in literally every other scenario.
 

billiebob

Well-known member
I used winter tires and they blew away the MTs and ATs
Until you run winter tires you have nothing to compare them too.

Not stuck here, I stopped, took the picture, backed up 5 feet and kept going.

DSC_0003.jpeg
 

Smileyshaun

Observer
Also the kind of snow your running through has a lot to do with it , if it’s that light fluffy perfect powder snow almost any tire will pull you through around here we tend to get that wonderfully crappy “concrete snow “ that is like pushing through a solid wall trying to break trail .
 

Smileyshaun

Observer
I can’t seem to find the other picture but here’s a quick story about the differences in type of snow.
Rented a cabin for New Year’s a couple years ago and on the way there stopped in a parking lot that had maybe 4 inches of snow that had kind of melted and froze back over. With my tires aired down to 12 psi I still could barely make progress out of the parking lot with my stock size all season tires requiring me to do a bit of shoveling to get enough of a running start to get out of the incline . Two days later we tried taking a back way home and with a ton of fresh powder it was amazingly fun plowing trail for a good 10 miles but when it started coming over the hood I decided to turnaround . Same tires , same psi just two completely different kinds of snow .
A301C83C-3CC8-4B2F-99A1-DA76F44DA579.png

It’s like that with a lot of terrain when someone’s swears my one tire that lives in the desert, that tire might be completely worthless and a very wet damp area and vise versa . Tire technology has gotten a ton better but there will still not be any tire that works perfect everywhere a lot of your tire selection will really have to come down to where you live and what terrain you encounter the most.
 
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